Typhoon Mangkhut: Storm Slams Philippines on Landfall

Typhoon Mangkhut: Storm Slams Philippines on Landfall

Typhoon Mangkhut struck the Philippines early Saturday after thousands of people evacuated their homes to dodge the 550-mile-wide storm as it roared across the Pacific.The ferocity of the storm — with maximum sustained winds of around 120 miles per hour — in some ways eclipsed Hurricane Florence on the other side of the world, which was pummeling the Mid-Atlantic Coast of the United States with life-threatening rains and flooding.As dawn was breaking in the Philippines, there was no official word on casualties or damage.The eye of Mangkhut, known as Ompong in the Philippines, made landfall on the northeastern portion of Luzon island, the country’s rice- and corn-growing heartland, at about 1:40 a.m.[Catch up on the rest of our storm coverage.]

FDA Cracks Down on E-Cigarettes to Curb Teen-Vaping 'Epidemic'

FDA Cracks Down on E-Cigarettes to Curb Teen-Vaping 'Epidemic'

Now, recent data, like a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing that 2.1 million middle- and high-school students used e-cigarettes in 2017, is prompting the agency to rethink its position.“The FDA won’t tolerate a whole generation of young people becoming addicted to nicotine as a tradeoff for enabling adults to have unfettered access to these same products,” he said.Gottlieb’s offensive seems primarily aimed at Juul, the most popular of the e-cigarettes, with an estimated 70 percent share of the retail market according to Nielsen data.

EPA admits scrapping regulations will put more methane into atmosphere

EPA admits scrapping regulations will put more methane into atmosphere

The Trump administration is seeking to roll back regulations on methane leaks from oil and gas facilities. The Trump administration is moving to roll back Obama-era rules intended to reduce leaks of methane from oil and gas facilities.

Kavanaugh’s views on EPA’s climate authority are dangerous and wrong | Dana Nuccitelli

Kavanaugh’s views on EPA’s climate authority are dangerous and wrong | Dana Nuccitelli

EPA, the Supreme Court affirmed that greenhouse gases qualify as air pollutants, and EPA therefore has authority to regulate them if the agency determines that they may endanger public health or welfare.

The E.P.A.’s Review of Mercury Rules Could Remake Its Methods for Valuing Human Life and Health

The E.P.A.’s Review of Mercury Rules Could Remake Its Methods for Valuing Human Life and Health

The formulas are complex, but the bottom line is that reducing the emphasis on health makes it tougher to justify a rule.Last week the Trump administration took a crucial step toward de-emphasizing the life and health benefits in this calculus when the Environmental Protection Agency said it would rethink a major regulation that restricts mercury emissions by coal-burning power plants.

E.P.A. to Reconsider Obama-Era Curbs on Mercury Emissions by Power Plants

E.P.A. to Reconsider Obama-Era Curbs on Mercury Emissions by Power Plants

That rule would have restricted coal plants’ emission of a different pollutant: carbon dioxide, one of the chief causes of global warming.At the time the Obama administration put forth the mercury regulations, which took more than 20 years to formulate, E.P.A. officials estimated they would save thousands of lives and return economic and health benefits many times their estimated $9.6 billion annual cost.While owners of coal plants fought the rule in the courts, most have since complied with regulation.

SF Is Bringing Back Banned Electric Scooters—With Limits

SF Is Bringing Back Banned Electric Scooters—With Limits

Each company can operate at least 625 scooters, and permits will be finalized by October 15.Skip ScootersThe scooters are back in town.Three months after ejecting the networks of shared, sidewalk-cluttering vehicles from the city, officials with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency announced today the two winners of its e-scooter pilot sweepstakes: Scoot and Skip.The city chose the companies from a crowded field of 12, which submitted a collective 800 pages in proposals on their operations, safety, and plans to extend the scooter bounty to San Francisco's neighborhoods.