Mathematicians Discover the Perfect Way to Multiply

Mathematicians Discover the Perfect Way to Multiply

“With addition, you do it a year earlier in school because it’s much easier, you can do it in linear time, almost as fast as reading the numbers from right to left,” said Martin Fürer, a mathematician at Pennsylvania State University who in 2007 created what was at the time the fastest multiplication algorithm.

What I Learned By Binge-Watching Game of Thrones Backward

What I Learned By Binge-Watching Game of Thrones Backward

In an attempt to rebel against the algorithms that have placed Thrones ' biggest reveals in front of my face for eight years, I decided to watch the series spoiler-first—learn the bad thing, then learn what caused it.

Finally! A DNA Computer That Can Actually Be Reprogrammed

Finally! A DNA Computer That Can Actually Be Reprogrammed

They showed it’s possible to use a simple trigger to coax the same basic set of DNA molecules into implementing numerous different algorithms. As these DNA tiles link up during the assembly process, they form a circuit that implements the chosen molecular algorithm on the input bits provided by the seed.

Will Machines Be Able to Tell When Patients Are About to Die?

Will Machines Be Able to Tell When Patients Are About to Die?

An AI dying algorithm portends major changes for the field of palliative care, and there are companies pursuing this goal of predicting the timing of mortality, like CareSkore, but predicting whether someone will die while in a hospital is just one dimension of what neural networks can predict from the data in a health system’s electronic records.

How Amazon's Algorithms Curated a Dystopian Bookstore

How Amazon's Algorithms Curated a Dystopian Bookstore

One has a confident-looking doctor on the cover, but the author doesn’t have an MD—a quick Google search reveals that he’s a medical journalist with the “ThinkTwice Global Vaccine Institute.” Scrolling through a simple keyword search for “vaccine” in Amazon’s top-level Books section reveals anti-vax literature prominently marked as “#1 Best Seller” in categories ranging from Emergency Pediatrics to History of Medicine to Chemistry.

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

The search company champions self-regulation, highlighting how it has chosen not to offer a general-purpose facial recognition service—as Microsoft and Amazon do—due to concerns it could be used to “carry out extreme surveillance.” The paper also says Google has limited some of the AI research code it has released, to reduce the risk of misuse.

The Dutch Science Park Unlocking the Secrets of the Universe

The Dutch Science Park Unlocking the Secrets of the Universe

Related Stories To detect it, the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics developed a 17-inch glass ball, which physicist Paul de Jong calls an "insect eye." It contains 31 photomultiplier tubes that amplify the signals of electrons released by photons, helping scientists reconstruct the direction of the original particle that produced the light—illuminating not only neutrinos, but also black holes, supernova, and other mysteries of space.

Google's Algorithm Isn't Biased, It's Just Not Human

Google's Algorithm Isn't Biased, It's Just Not Human

And at Tuesday's questioning of Pichai by the House Judiciary Committee, a string of Republicans hit their cues, insisting that the negative results from a Google search of their names or favored legislation must have been personally typed out by vengeful programmers in far-left California.Noam Cohen is an Ideas contributor at WIRED, a writer living in Brooklyn, and the author of The Know-It-Alls: The Rise of Silicon Valley as a Political Powerhouse and Social Wrecking Ball.Pichai patiently explained what an algorithm was and how Google’s algorithm had no reason to offend Republicans.

What the Boston School Bus Schedule Can Teach Us About AI

What the Boston School Bus Schedule Can Teach Us About AI

The algorithm used to set these times had been designed by MIT researchers, and about a week later, Kade Crockford, director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts, emailed asking me to cosign an op-ed that would call on policymakers to be more thoughtful and democratic when they consider using algorithms to change policies that affect the lives of residents.

Free Speech Is Not the Same As Free Reach

Free Speech Is Not the Same As Free Reach

Free Speech Is Not the Same As Free ReachJabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty ImagesThe algorithms that govern how we find information online are once again in the news—but you have to squint to find them.“Trump Accuses Google of Burying Conservative News in Search Results,” reads an August 28 New York Times headline.

I Invented Autocorrect. Sorry About That; You're Welcome

I Invented Autocorrect. Sorry About That; You're Welcome

To be a smartphone user is to accept the ergonomics and software of small touchscreen keyboards.When I started working with a small team of engineers and designers at Apple in late 2005 to create a touchscreen operating system for Purple—the codename of the super-secret skunk works project that became the iPhone—we didn’t know if typing on a small, touch-sensitive sheet of glass was technologically feasible or a fool’s errand.

Meet the Rosehip Cell, a New Kind of Human Neuron

Meet the Rosehip Cell, a New Kind of Human Neuron

Sequencing technologies, for one, can reveal how cells with the same exact DNA turn their genes on or off in unique ways—and these methods are beginning to reveal that the brain is a more diverse forest of bristling nodes and branching energies than even Ramón y Cajal could have imagined.On Monday, an international team of researchers introduced the world to a new kind of neuron, which, at this point, is believed to exist only in the human brain.