Why hurricane forecasters can’t ‘politicize’ storm warnings even if they wanted to

Why hurricane forecasters can’t ‘politicize’ storm warnings even if they wanted to

In 2016 conservative news blogger Matt Drudge accused the federal government of hyping the threat as Hurricane Matthew approached the U.S. coast, purportedly to play up possible links between extreme weather and climate change.

WIRED25: Welcome to Our Robot Petting Zoo

WIRED25: Welcome to Our Robot Petting Zoo

The four-day WIRED Festival, happening all over San Francisco on October 12–15, celebrates everything that makes today's world fascinating, inspiring, and, yes, sometimes a little unsettling.Our updated speaker and event lineup includes a robot petting zoo (where the robots pet you back!), a punning contest, an art studio tour, some kid-friendly science fun with Adam Savage's Mythbusters Jr., behind-the-scenes tours of SFMOMA, a DJ set with Questlove, and screenings of WIRED-approved films at Alamo Drafthouse.The four-day celebration will start with WIRED25 WORK, a day of insider office tours, and culminate at the WIRED25 SUMMIT at SF Jazz.

These 3 Hurricane Misconceptions Can Be Dangerous. Scientists Want to Clear Them Up.

These 3 Hurricane Misconceptions Can Be Dangerous. Scientists Want to Clear Them Up.

But experts know that not all residents will heed the warnings, and some say part of the reason is that storm forecasts and risks are inadequately communicated to the public.“There’s a big gap between the forecasts that are available within the weather community and in some cases the information that people receive and are able to use,” said Rebecca Morss, a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.The ‘cone of uncertainty’ is confusingA prime example of that perception gap is the familiar “cone of uncertainty” seen in hurricane tracking maps, which can be easily misread.“The cone is misunderstood,” said Jeff Masters, a meteorologist with the forecasting service Weather Underground.

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

As for fatalities, the deadliest storm on record in the United States happened in 1900, when surging waters killed more than 6,000 people in Galveston, Tex. This was before modern weather forecasting, however, and many people failed to evacuate the area.How is climate change influencing Hurricane Florence and hurricanes more generally?NOAA says to think of warm water as the engine that fuels hurricanes.

Wisconsin's Floods Are Catastrophic—and Only Getting Worse

Wisconsin's Floods Are Catastrophic—and Only Getting Worse

The Kickapoo River in southwest Wisconsin rose to record levels — as high as six feet above the previous high water mark — producing damage that local emergency management officials described as “breathtaking.”In the tiny Wisconsin town of Gays Mills, this is the third catastrophic flood in 10 years.

How That Magical Jack Dorsey–Alex Jones Photo Happened

How That Magical Jack Dorsey–Alex Jones Photo Happened

"It's a rare thing to be alone on an island with such a dramatic scene developing in front of you," Mahaskey says.His photograph records a tight web of figures, their gestures and expressions so intense as to seem exaggerated, like those of characters in a play.

When We Almost Stopped Climate Change

When We Almost Stopped Climate Change

And if you’re interested in advertising with “The Daily,” write to us at thedaily-ads@nytimes.com.How do I listen to ‘The Daily’?July 16, 2018Nathaniel Rich contributed reporting.“When We Almost Stopped Climate Change” was produced by Clare Toeniskoetter, with help from Michael Simon Johnson, and edited by Paige Cowett and Lisa Tobin.“The Daily” is produced by Theo Balcomb, Annie Brown, Jessica Cheung, Paige Cowett, Lynsea Garrison, Michael Simon Johnson, Andy Mills, Rachel Quester, Ike Sriskandarajah and Clare Toeniskoetter, with editing help from Larissa Anderson.

NASA's MISR views raging fires in California – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

NASA's MISR views raging fires in California – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite passed over California on July 27 and July 29, observing the Carr Fire on July 27 and the Ferguson Fire on July 29.

NatureNet Science Research Update: Nanotechnology

NatureNet Science Research Update: Nanotechnology

NatureNet Science Research Update: Nanotechnology Scientist working in the clean room at the Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania) © The Nature Conservancy/Cara Byington Smart nature straight to your inbox every week Sign up for the newsletter