Typhoon Mangkhut: Storm Slams Philippines on Landfall

Typhoon Mangkhut: Storm Slams Philippines on Landfall

Typhoon Mangkhut struck the Philippines early Saturday after thousands of people evacuated their homes to dodge the 550-mile-wide storm as it roared across the Pacific.The ferocity of the storm — with maximum sustained winds of around 120 miles per hour — in some ways eclipsed Hurricane Florence on the other side of the world, which was pummeling the Mid-Atlantic Coast of the United States with life-threatening rains and flooding.As dawn was breaking in the Philippines, there was no official word on casualties or damage.The eye of Mangkhut, known as Ompong in the Philippines, made landfall on the northeastern portion of Luzon island, the country’s rice- and corn-growing heartland, at about 1:40 a.m.[Catch up on the rest of our storm coverage.]

'Limited' progress at Bangkok climate talks

'Limited' progress at Bangkok climate talks

Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, said on Sunday at the closing press briefing for the Bangkok meeting that progress was made on most issues but nothing was finalised.

Space Photos of the Week: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagon

Space Photos of the Week: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagon

They also note distinct concentrations of smaller haze particles inside compared with the outside.Jupiter’s candy-cane, red and white color scheme is eye-catching, but it turns out there is more to the story: When NASA’s Juno swung by and captured detailed photos researchers noted clumps of cyclones.

Remember That Catastrophic Natural Gas Leak in California? Yeah, That Could Happen Again

Remember That Catastrophic Natural Gas Leak in California? Yeah, That Could Happen Again

Remember That Catastrophic Natural Gas Leak in California? Overhead photo of the leaking Aliso Canyon well pad in Los Angeles County. The natural gas billowing from the well is not visible to the naked eye, but can be seen with special infrared cameras.