Hurricane Florence: How to Help

Hurricane Florence: How to Help

The Red Cross keeps a blood supply on hand to respond to emergencies, but it’s perishable, and natural disasters interfere with collections in the affected areas.United WayMary Sellers, the president of the American division of the nonprofit United Way, said that the organization was prepared to help its local partners with disaster response — but also that people should think about the medium- and long-term effects of Hurricane Florence.

'Warning of what has already arrived': Florence is a climate change triple threat | Michael Mann

'Warning of what has already arrived': Florence is a climate change triple threat | Michael Mann

If we don’t act on climate change, the destruction potential of slow-moving storms such as Harvey and Florence will only get worse

5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence

5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence

Experts say you should never drive through fast-moving water.5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence Experts provide the steps you can take to avoid them. Experts say you should never drive through fast-moving water.Drenching rains were inundating North Carolina on Friday as Hurricane Florence crawled inland at three miles an hour.

Hurricane Florence update: Can future Category 6 hurricanes be STOPPED?

Hurricane Florence update: Can future Category 6 hurricanes be STOPPED?

Trenberth, Distinguished Senior Scientist in the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to find out if it was too late to stop possible future category 6 hurricanes.Hurricane Florence update: Nine dangerous storms were spotted around the globe this week (Image: Jamaica Weather)He said: “The risk is real.

Hurricane Florence and Super Typhoon Mangkhut: Catch Up on the News

Hurricane Florence and Super Typhoon Mangkhut: Catch Up on the News

14Two powerful storms are threatening lives and livelihoods this week on opposite ends of the earth — Hurricane Florence, which made landfall Friday morning while battering the North Carolina coast with strong winds and blinding rain, and Super Typhoon Mangkhut, which has whipped up lashing winds on its way toward the Philippines.

As the Winds Come, Towns in Hurricane Florence’s Path Fear the Floods

As the Winds Come, Towns in Hurricane Florence’s Path Fear the Floods

Emergency rescue teams were trying to reach about 150 others still trapped in cars, on roofs and in their attics.Greenville lies far inland, a few score miles west of the Atlantic Ocean, but it is connected to the sea by the Tar River, which eventually becomes the Pamlico River as it widens out and flows into the Atlantic.On Thursday, as billowing, dark heather clouds loomed overhead, the city’s spokesman, Brock Letchworth, said Greenville’s first concern is that Florence could drop enough water to create immediate flash flooding.But he said the city was also worried about a massive salty storm surge roaring westward up the river from the Atlantic.

Hurricane Florence Live Updates: Rescues in North Carolina as Storm Makes Landfall

Hurricane Florence Live Updates: Rescues in North Carolina as Storm Makes Landfall

In the riverfront city of New Bern, emergency rescue teams were trying to reach hundreds of residents trapped in cars, on roofs and in their attics as the Neuse River overflowed and flooded the city.Here are the latest developments:• The storm, which was downgraded to Category 1 late Thursday, made landfall about 7:15 a.m., with winds of about 90 miles an hour.

How to Use Social Media Responsibly During Hurricane Florence

How to Use Social Media Responsibly During Hurricane Florence

If you see a Twitter feed that you don’t know tweeting information or images, be careful before you push that along.'Matt Gertz, Media Matters for America"Make sure if you are going to repost something that the source is credible, number one, because a lot of hysteria happens," Steven Stalinksy of the Middle East Research Institute, who studies social media, told WIRED last year about how to behave online during breaking news.

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

The first effects of the now Category 1 Hurricane Florence are already being felt in the Carolinas, where the storm is expected to make landfall later today, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

Climate change means Hurricane Florence will dump 50% more rain

Climate change means Hurricane Florence will dump 50% more rain

Hurricane Florence is set to bring 50% more rainfall to the US east coast due to human-induced climate change, according to a landmark forecast that has outlined the influence of warming temperatures upon the looming storm.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

“The large amount of rain that is going to come out of a tropical storm or hurricane anyway fell in the same place over a long period of time.”To analyze the changes in translation speeds, James Kossin, a climate scientist with the National Centers for Environmental Information at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tapped into a global data set on past tropical storms.

Hurricane Florence’s Path: Closing In on Carolina Coast

Hurricane Florence’s Path: Closing In on Carolina Coast

Federal, state and local officials, who have already spent days trying to warn people in Florence’s path of the potential severity of the storm, issued some of their most strident pleas yet on Wednesday for people to get out of harm’s way.“We know a lot of our coastal residents have ridden out storms before,” said Gov. Roy Cooper of North Carolina during a Wednesday evening news conference.

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

As for fatalities, the deadliest storm on record in the United States happened in 1900, when surging waters killed more than 6,000 people in Galveston, Tex. This was before modern weather forecasting, however, and many people failed to evacuate the area.How is climate change influencing Hurricane Florence and hurricanes more generally?NOAA says to think of warm water as the engine that fuels hurricanes.

Hurricane Florence: Storm’s Path Shifts and 3 Million Could Lose Power

Hurricane Florence: Storm’s Path Shifts and 3 Million Could Lose Power

The hurricane will then gather strength and spread inland as the center of the storm edges toward the coast on Friday afternoon, bringing torrential rainfall of up to 40 inches that will continue through Saturday and Sunday.Here are the latest developments:• The major power supplier for North and South Carolina, Duke Energy, said that the storm could knock out power for up to three million customers across the two states and that it could take several weeks to restore electricity.• The storm was predicted to slow and the eye could stall just offshore, battering the coast with high waves and dropping as much as 20 to 40 inches of rain in flood-prone coastal areas.

A Huge Storm, and Newsletter Changes

A Huge Storm, and Newsletter Changes

In response, we’re beginning a new feature that looks at steps individuals can take to reduce their carbon footprint.We start in the kitchen, with the elephant in the room: the refrigerator.Recommendations vary slightly among government agencies and consumer groups, but the proper temperature for a household refrigerator is 37 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit (3 to 4 degrees Celsius).

As Florence’s Power Nears the Carolinas, Residents Brace for the Worst

As Florence’s Power Nears the Carolinas, Residents Brace for the Worst

As Florence’s Power Nears the Carolinas, Residents Brace for the WorstMany coastal communities in the Carolinas, including Nags Head, N.C., emptied out on Tuesday after the approach of Hurricane Florence prompted mandatory evacuation orders.With millions of coastal residents either on the move or hunkering down anxiously in place, Hurricane Florence surged toward North Carolina on Tuesday, tracing an unusual path that could lead to tremendous destruction — especially if the immense storm dumps enormous amounts of rain as it moves inland.“This could be an unprecedented disaster for North Carolina,” said Brian McNoldy, a senior research associate at the University of Miami, in a post on Tuesday on his popular hurricane blog.[ Are you in the path of Hurricane Florence?

Hurricane Florence: How climate change is increasing the threat from tropical storms

Hurricane Florence: How climate change is increasing the threat from tropical storms

James Kossin of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published a study in the journal Nature in June suggesting that slow-moving tropical cyclones, which would include those like Florence and Harvey, have become more common over the last 70 years, dropping in speed by 10 per cent in that time.

This One-Armed Robot Is Super Manipulative (in a Good Way)

This One-Armed Robot Is Super Manipulative (in a Good Way)

“This is all about letting the robot supervise itself, rather than humans going in and doing annotations,” says coauthor Lucas Manuelli, also of MIT CSAIL.“I can see how this is very useful in industrial applications where the hard part is finding a good point to grasp,” says Matthias Plappert, an engineer at OpenAI who has developed a system for a robot hand to teach itself how to manipulate, but who wasn’t involved in this work.

Hurricane Florence Strengthening and Targeting the Southeast Coast, Forecasters Say

Hurricane Florence Strengthening and Targeting the Southeast Coast, Forecasters Say

Hurricane Florence Strengthening and Targeting the Southeast Coast, Forecasters SayTropical Storm Florence was upgraded to a hurricane on Sunday.NOAA, via Associated PressForecasters on Sunday upgraded Tropical Storm Florence to a hurricane, saying it was strengthening and taking aim at North and South Carolina, where it could make landfall by the end of the week.“We expect a rapid intensification of Florence tomorrow,” Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman for the National Hurricane Center, said on Sunday.