Typhoon Mangkhut Wreaks Havoc in Philippines, Leaving at Least 16 Dead

Typhoon Mangkhut Wreaks Havoc in Philippines, Leaving at Least 16 Dead

“Early indications suggest that the prompt evacuations made by local authorities have mitigated the impact on civilians.”People clearing a toppled utility pole in Cagayan Province, north of Manila, on Saturday.Ted Aljibe/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesAmong the casualties was a family of four killed when a landslide struck their home in the Cordillera Mountains, south of Claveria, according to a top government official, Francis Tolentino.

Typhoon Mangkhut: How to Help

Typhoon Mangkhut: How to Help

The northernmost towns of Cagayan are believed to be badly hit and it is still difficult to access these areas as of the moment.”Catholic Relief Services, an international humanitarian organization, said it would provide shelter and distribute food, water and hygiene kits.GlobalGiving, a nonprofit that redistributes funds to vetted, locally focused groups, said the money it raised would pay for emergency supplies including food, water and medicine.The United Methodist Committee on Relief has three disaster management coordinators at the scene of the typhoon, said a committee spokesman, Dan Curran.Presbyterian Disaster Assistance noted that the typhoon would affect an area recently struck by Barijat, a cyclone.

Enter the Age of Borderless Memes

Enter the Age of Borderless Memes

It isn’t really an outlier, either: Mukbang is just one of Asia’s most successful entrants to a new class of global internet phenomena—simple visual- and video-focused memes that are so basic in their appeal that the boundaries of geography and culture don’t apply.In just over a year, mukbang has shifted from a Youtube niche to a mainstream trope—a high-calorie riff on the haul video.

Puffins are declining and climate change could become the largest cause

Puffins are declining and climate change could become the largest cause

Hansen is working with Fayet, a junior research fellow at the University of Oxford who is from France, on her project to monitor the activities of four puffin colonies – two in Iceland and others in Wales and Norway.

A Huge Storm, and Newsletter Changes

A Huge Storm, and Newsletter Changes

In response, we’re beginning a new feature that looks at steps individuals can take to reduce their carbon footprint.We start in the kitchen, with the elephant in the room: the refrigerator.Recommendations vary slightly among government agencies and consumer groups, but the proper temperature for a household refrigerator is 37 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit (3 to 4 degrees Celsius).

Climate change driving up malnutrition rates in Pacific, UN warns

Climate change driving up malnutrition rates in Pacific, UN warns

Climate change is making people hungry – with nearly 100 million people across the world needing humanitarian food aid because of climate shocks last year – and a growing number of people are malnourished across the Pacific, a new United Nations report says.

How You Can Prepare to Evacuate Your Home for Hurricane Florence

How You Can Prepare to Evacuate Your Home for Hurricane Florence

How You Can Prepare to Evacuate Your Home for Hurricane Florence Here are some tips for getting ready: Make a plan, bring documents, close lids, clear the yard, blast the freezer.Illustration by Claire O'Neill/The New York TimesFor the latest updates, read our Hurricane Florence live briefing here.When a hurricane is poised to make landfall and the authorities issue an evacuation order, you may not have much time before you leave to protect your home from the storm — and from flooding.“People have a hard time internalizing, preparing for something that’s outside their realm of experience,” said J.

Climate shocks an 'early warning call' to act on rising hunger, UN says

Climate shocks an 'early warning call' to act on rising hunger, UN says

Climate shocks such as droughts, floods and variable rainfall, are already causing a rise in hunger, a situation UN economists describe as an “early warning call” for action on food insecurity.

Global hunger levels rising due to extreme weather, UN warns

Global hunger levels rising due to extreme weather, UN warns

Global hunger has reverted to levels last seen a decade ago, wiping out progress on improving people’s access to food and leaving one in nine people undernourished last year, with extreme weather a leading cause, the UN has warned.

News Article: Global hunger continues to rise, new UN report says

"If we are to achieve a world without hunger and malnutrition in all its forms by 2030, it is imperative that we accelerate and scale up actions to strengthen the resilience and adaptive capacity of food systems and people's livelihoods in response to climate variability and extremes," the leaders said.

Rice farming up to twice as bad for climate change as previously thought, study reveals

Rice farming up to twice as bad for climate change as previously thought, study reveals

“Water management on rice farms needs to be calibrated to balance water use concerns with the climate impacts of both methane and nitrous oxide emissions.” “We now know nitrous oxide emissions from rice farming can be large and impactful,” said Richie Ahuja, a co-author of this study.

Climate change conflicts are here – and ‘scallop wars’ are just the beginning

Climate change conflicts are here – and ‘scallop wars’ are just the beginning

The oceans have absorbed most of this temperature increase, and so many marine species, including commercially fished scallops, are under particular stress to migrate northwards to cooler waters.

Climate change will reshape the world’s agricultural trade

Climate change will reshape the world’s agricultural trade

Our results suggest that global trade patterns of agricultural commodities may be significantly different from today’s reality – with or without carbon mitigation. The opposite occurs without carbon mitigation: the production and exports of wheat are projected to decline due to climate change impacts on agriculture.

The Bugs Are Coming, and They’ll Want More of Our Food

The Bugs Are Coming, and They’ll Want More of Our Food

Worldwide, insect pests consume up to 20 percent of the plants that humans grow for food, and that amount will increase as global warming makes bugs hungrier, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.That could encourage farmers to use more pesticides, which could cause further environmental harm, scientists said.For every degree Celsius (two degrees Fahrenheit) that temperatures rise above the global historical average, the amount of wheat, corn, and rice lost to insects will increase by 10 to 25 percent, the study says.

Fears over climate change hit highest level in a decade following heatwave, study says

Fears over climate change hit highest level in a decade following heatwave, study says

British people’s concern over climate change hit the highest level in almost a decade amid the record-breaking heatwave which swept across Britain this summer, a new poll has revealed.

Eating as a political, social, spiritual act: The World Peace Diet

Eating as a political, social, spiritual act: The World Peace Diet

Food is a tool to nourish life but also for taking political action and for averting the dangers of climate change and preventing unnecessary harm. By reducing animal agriculture, we also could improve health, stabilize grain prices, enhance food security and prevent unnecessary harm and violence.

Reducing food waste can protect our health, as well as our planet’s

Reducing food waste can protect our health, as well as our planet’s

Food waste costs Australia A$20 billion each year and is damaging our planet’s resources by contributing to climate change and inefficient land, fertiliser and freshwater use. Healthy and sustainable dietary recommendations promote the consumption of fewer processed foods, which are energy-dense, highly processed and packaged.

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

“In some temperate countries, insect pest damage to crops is projected to rise sharply as temperatures continue to climb, putting serious pressure on grain producers,” said Professor Joshua Tewksbury, co-lead author of the study and a research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Crop losses to pests will soar as climate warms, study warns

Crop losses to pests will soar as climate warms, study warns

Rising temperatures make insects eat and breed more, leading to food losses growing world population cannot afford, say scientists “The results show that insects will cause significantly increased grain loss across many regions of a warmer world,” he said.

News Article: FAO helps countries lay the groundwork for climate-resilient initiatives

11 June 2018, Rome - The UN Food and Agriculture Organization is supporting ten projects in countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe and South America to lay the groundwork for climate-resilient adaptation initiatives, funded by the Green Climate Fund (GCF)'s Readiness Programme.

News Article: Fundamental shift in drought management needed in Near East and North Africa region

"We need to perceive and manage droughts differently, and shift from emergency response to more pro-active policy and long-term planning to reduce risks and build greater resilience," said Rene Castro, FAO's Assistant Director-General, Climate, Biodiversity, Land and Water Department.

News Article: Forests and trees are key for a sustainable future

Halting deforestation, managing forests sustainably, restoring degraded forests and adding to worldwide tree cover all require actions to avoid potentially damaging consequences for the planet and its people, according to The State of the World's Forests 2018.Forests and trees contribute far more to human livelihoods than is commonly known, playing crucial roles in food security, drinking water, renewable energy and rural economies.

News Article: Healthy soils are essential to achieve Zero Hunger, peace and prosperity

13 August 2018, Rio de Janeiro - Improving the health of the world's soils is essential to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including Zero Hunger and combating climate change and its impacts, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva, today told participants of the World Congress of Soil Science.

The potential of the Blue Economy

The potential of the Blue Economy

Together with the United Nations and other partners, we are looking forward to working with member states and other stakeholders to respond to existing challenges and to design a way forward that allow for sustainable economic growth making the most from the oceans – building on the experience with green growth – including in unique areas such as the Galápagos Islands.

When They Said They Wanted to Rethink Agriculture, They Meant It

When They Said They Wanted to Rethink Agriculture, They Meant It

“Presumably, agricultural systems have been motivated by the need to feed more people and to remain profitable,” says Davis, “and this suggests that environmental impacts of food production – like water use for irrigation – only receive secondary consideration in a farmer’s decision of what crop to plant.

Like to Eat? Then You Should Care About Biodiversity

Like to Eat? Then You Should Care About Biodiversity

Through the implementation of healthy agricultural systems in Colombia, The Nature Conservancy and partners are demonstrating that biodiversity can increase ecosystem’s productivity and its long-term growth.

Plastic Makers' Credit Ratings May Be Hit by Pollution Rules

Plastic Makers' Credit Ratings May Be Hit by Pollution Rules

Makers of packaging for the food and beverage industry may also have similar issues, Wagner said. Moody’s analysts plan to scrutinize how the trend impacts companies, though plastic risk hasn’t prompted any change in credit ratings yet, Wagner said.