Space Photos of the Week: The Galaxy Next Door

Space Photos of the Week: The Galaxy Next Door

If you’re able to divert your eyes from the big show in the upper right, take a look at the object in the center of the image: That blue cloud is LHA 120-N 180B, likely an active star-forming region.

Space Photos of the Week: Look, Ma, No Selfie Stick!

Space Photos of the Week: Look, Ma, No Selfie Stick!

A new study funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation used the distribution of dark matter in young galaxies to better understand what could have been feeding these dense objects so early on.

Best Space Photos of 2018, From Penguins to Selfies on Mars

Best Space Photos of 2018, From Penguins to Selfies on Mars

Although Dawn is done, it will remain in a stable orbit around Ceres for the next 50 years or so to protect the surface from any potential contaminants left on the spacecraft from Earth.InSight landed on the dusty, rocky surface of Mars on November 26, and moments after touching down, it took this photo of the ground.

Unexpectedly Vanishing Quasars Are Mystifying Scientists

Unexpectedly Vanishing Quasars Are Mystifying Scientists

To turn the quasar off, all of that material would have to swirl inward and fall onto the black hole — a process that calculations and even observations suggest should take tens to hundreds of thousands of years.“There’s no way that the accretion should be able to shut down as quickly as we’ve seen it do,” said Paul Green, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Space Photos of the Week: A Star Is Born After Gases Crash

Space Photos of the Week: A Star Is Born After Gases Crash

And all this creation maybe have been the result of an accidental collision: Scientists believe a galaxy in the vicinity collided with ESO 338-4, and their subsequent interaction of gas and dust is what’s feeding all the stellar activity in this region.We’ve come across the galaxy cluster called Abell 2597 in our travels before, but never looking like this.