Weatherwatch: slower tropical storms are raising flood threat

Weatherwatch: slower tropical storms are raising flood threat

Falls in the average tracking speeds of hurricanes and typhoons, attributed to global warming, put more lives at risk Research published in Nature earlier this year showed that the average speed at which tropical storms track has slowed down by 10% since 1949.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

“The large amount of rain that is going to come out of a tropical storm or hurricane anyway fell in the same place over a long period of time.”To analyze the changes in translation speeds, James Kossin, a climate scientist with the National Centers for Environmental Information at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tapped into a global data set on past tropical storms.

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

As for fatalities, the deadliest storm on record in the United States happened in 1900, when surging waters killed more than 6,000 people in Galveston, Tex. This was before modern weather forecasting, however, and many people failed to evacuate the area.How is climate change influencing Hurricane Florence and hurricanes more generally?NOAA says to think of warm water as the engine that fuels hurricanes.

Hurricane Florence: How climate change is increasing the threat from tropical storms

Hurricane Florence: How climate change is increasing the threat from tropical storms

James Kossin of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published a study in the journal Nature in June suggesting that slow-moving tropical cyclones, which would include those like Florence and Harvey, have become more common over the last 70 years, dropping in speed by 10 per cent in that time.