Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like CultsMaddie McGarvey/Bloomberg/Getty ImagesIn recent months there’s been an increase in stories in which a follower of radical conspiracies shifts their actions from the web and into the world.In June, a QAnon conspiracy follower kicked off a one-man standoff at the Hoover Dam. Another QAnon supporter was arrested the next month occupying a Cemex cement factory, claiming that he had knowledge that Cemex was secretly assisting in child trafficking—a theory discussed in Facebook groups, in an attempt to push it into Twitter trending topics.Renee DiResta (@noUpside) is an Ideas contributor for WIRED, the director of research at New Knowledge, and a Mozilla fellow on media, misinformation, and trust.

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