A Floating Glass Bead Could Help Physicists Probe the Unknown

A Floating Glass Bead Could Help Physicists Probe the Unknown

One goal for such precise sensors is to create high-resolution images of individual proteins and other molecules, says physicist Adrian Bachtold, a colleague of Ricci’s who is not involved in this work.

It's Not a Myth: Quantum Messages Really Can Travel Faster

It's Not a Myth: Quantum Messages Really Can Travel Faster

“We are the first to show a quantum advantage for transmitted information that two parties have to share to perform a useful task,” said Eleni Diamanti , an electrical engineer at Sorbonne University and a co-author of the result along with Iordanis Kerenidis , a computer scientist at Paris Diderot University, and Niraj Kumar .

Drop the Batteries—Diamonds and Lasers Could Power Your Drone

Drop the Batteries—Diamonds and Lasers Could Power Your Drone

Researchers at LakeDiamond, a spinoff of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, think their solution could be the dilithium crystal of roaming drones.They have developed an artificial diamond that can help a laser beam maintain its quality over much longer ranges, and say ground-based networks of these diamond-enhanced power sources could send drones flying great distances, without wasting power to haul their big batteries around.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to DronesLakeDiamond CEO Pascal Gallo says the company’s lab-created diamond—a smooth, tiny rectangle placed directly in front of the laser source—can convert a low-power laser diode into a beam with consistent, parallel rays that can stretch several hundred meters.

Should We Let Kids Eat Dirt?

Should We Let Kids Eat Dirt?

As a parent in an era where half of my news feed cautions of the perils of living in an overly sanitized world and the other half highlights the dangers of flesh-eating bacteria, just how much exposure to soil are we supposed to give our children?

New Satellite's Lasers Will Track Tiny Changes in Polar Ice

New Satellite's Lasers Will Track Tiny Changes in Polar Ice

Once it settles into orbit 310 miles above the Earth, the satellite will start collecting data using a specially designed laser device that will give scientists more data about exactly where ice is melting and how fast.The NASA satellite will scan the Earth’s surface using six green laser beams to measure glaciers and floating sea ice.

NASA invites media to view launch of ICESat-2 from west coast – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

NASA invites media to view launch of ICESat-2 from west coast – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The ICESat-2 mission will measure the changing height of Earth's glaciers, ice sheets and sea ice, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses per second. Media accreditation is open for the launch of NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, scheduled for Saturday, Sept.

Counting on NASA's ICESat-2 – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Counting on NASA's ICESat-2 – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Hundreds of people at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, worked to build this smart-car-sized instrument to exacting requirements so that scientists can measure minute changes in our planet’s ice.