Cabbies Unite! An App Challenges the Uber and Lyft Overlords

Cabbies Unite! An App Challenges the Uber and Lyft Overlords

Itzhak is the head of HERE Mobility, an 18-month-old unit of the mapping company HERE (jointly owned by BMW, Audi, and Daimler) that today announced the launch of an app called SoMo. That’s for “social mobility,” and it’s what Itzhak calls an “open global neutral mobility marketplace,” which is a wordy way of saying, an effort to pull together pretty much every way of getting around that isn’t a ride-hail service.

A Third of Americans Use Ride-Hail. Uber and Lyft Need More

A Third of Americans Use Ride-Hail. Uber and Lyft Need More

That comports, mostly, with other surveys conducted in the past year about Uber and Lyft ridership, which have found that between 24.4 and 43 percent of the US population has used apps to summon rides.

The Tricky Business of Making Ride-Hail Work for Kids

The Tricky Business of Making Ride-Hail Work for Kids

The Tricky Business of Making Ride-Hail Work for Kids For parents who want to better protect their progeny, a new crop of services offer rigorously vetted drivers who can babysit as well as drive.

Lyft Bets Big on Bikes in NYC, and Uber Is None Too Happy

Lyft Bets Big on Bikes in NYC, and Uber Is None Too Happy

But both Uber and Lime say they’ve been snubbed, and that they want to expand service to more lower income New Yorkers.A mock-up of Lyft's branded dockless bikes, which the company says it might deploy in cities all over the US.

Airports Cracked Uber and Lyft—Time for Cities to Take Note

Airports Cracked Uber and Lyft—Time for Cities to Take Note

At San Francisco International, companies like Uber and Lyft now account for 75 percent of commercial ground transportation, says airport spokesperson Doug Yakel.

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

If the thought of holiday traffic next week is already getting you down, then we also have (futuristic) options for getting up and over it.HeadlinesStories you might have missed from WIRED this weekPublic transit is supposed to be equally accessible to anyone, but as Aarian Marshall reports, women pay a “pink transport tax.” In New York City, women pay $36 to $50 extra per month just to get around, mainly due to safety concerns.

Uber Rewards Loyalty Program Gives Perks to Power Users

Uber Rewards Loyalty Program Gives Perks to Power Users

Uber Rewards Loyalty Program Gives Perks to Power UsersIn a ride-hail landscape where persistent competitors like Lyft, Grab, and Careem offer virtually identical services and have blocked Uber’s bid for monopoly, the program is another path to keeping customers in the house that Travis (and Dara) built.Lucas Jackson/ReutersFor a service that’s meant to be easy to use, Uber can be awful stressful.

Outdoors for Everyone? We Need Better Access

Outdoors for Everyone? We Need Better Access

If we want the outdoors to be for everyone, we need to find access solutions to meet people where they are. Bringing people out to nature with discounted Lyft rides and organized camping trips is another solution REI (the outdoor clothing and gear company) is experimenting with.

Lyft's Bid to Rule the Streets Now Includes Public Transit

Lyft's Bid to Rule the Streets Now Includes Public Transit

You can see where each line goes, and when the next bus or train is coming.Starting this week in Santa Monica, the Lyft app will give some users access to information about public transit, including nearby lines.