The Confounding Climate Science of Lab-Grown Meat

The Confounding Climate Science of Lab-Grown Meat

“Energy-intensive forms of cultured production could be quite an extreme case, where you're basically swapping methane—because cattle emit a lot of methane—for potentially fossil fuel carbon dioxide,” says study lead author John Lynch, an environmental scientist at the University of Oxford.

If Edible Insects Are the Future, We Should Talk About Poop

If Edible Insects Are the Future, We Should Talk About Poop

Best case: insects that eat something people don’t , or can’t —solving a recycling problem while freeing up land to grow food for humans instead of human prey.

Oh, Lovely: The Tick That Gives People Meat Allergies Is Spreading

Oh, Lovely: The Tick That Gives People Meat Allergies Is Spreading

With that mystery solved, Platts-Mills turned to figuring out what made patients so sensitive to alpha-gal.The best hint he had was the geographic overlap between the cetuximab patients and previously reported meat allergies.

To Get Antibiotics Off Your Plate, Vote With Your Wallet

To Get Antibiotics Off Your Plate, Vote With Your Wallet

The “Summary Report On Antimicrobials Sold or Distributed for Use in Food-Producing Animals” contains data that pharma companies have given to the FDA on how many antibiotics are sold in the United States to be given to farm animals.This year’s report was highly anticipated, because it would show the numbers from 2017—the first year to reflect tough restrictions put in place in the last days of the Obama Administration.The anticipation was justified.

Embrace a Fake Meat Future for Its Lesser-Known Benefits

Embrace a Fake Meat Future for Its Lesser-Known Benefits

The company aims to release it in two years.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to Climate ChangeTo get to true mass adoption, fake meat will need to compete favorably with the real thing on multiple fronts.

The Government's Role in the Rise of Lab-Grown Meat

The Government's Role in the Rise of Lab-Grown Meat

The Government's Role in the Rise of Lab-Grown MeatA small scale production line of the leghemoglobin for a plant-based hamburger is displayed during a media tour of Impossible Foods labs and processing plant in Redwood City, California.Beck Diefenbach/ReutersLast month, the US Department of Agriculture and FDA convened to debate meat: what it is and isn't, and if plant-based or lab-grown products like those made by Impossible Burger and Memphis Meats should be called meat.

A Presidential Pardon for A Thanksgiving Raccoon

A Presidential Pardon for A Thanksgiving Raccoon

In 1926, President Calvin Coolidge received a raccoon as a Thanksgiving dinner gift. This decision probably didn’t surprise many people at the time, as Coolidge had quite a collection of animals at the White House, according to the Presidential Pet Museum.

Does Climate Change Mean You Should Fly Less? Yeah, Maybe

Does Climate Change Mean You Should Fly Less? Yeah, Maybe

Individual acts of conservation—alongside intense political engagement—are what signal an emergency to those around us, which will set larger changes in motion.It’s true that fossil fuel companies bear the lion’s share of responsibility for this crisis, and that consumers buying efficient light bulbs will not set things right; we need government action to shift our energy sources from coal and gas to sunlight and wind.

Europe must halve meat and dairy production by 2050 to save planet, expert says

Europe must halve meat and dairy production by 2050 to save planet, expert says

Europe’s agriculture industry is being urged to reduce meat and dairy production after research suggested it has surpassed safe limits for greenhouse emissions. A report from Rural Investment Support For Europe (RISE) supports Greenpeace’s campaign to drastically reduce global meat and dairy production by 2050 to keep the Paris climate agreement on track.

The Hidden Link Between Farm Antibiotics and Human Illness

The Hidden Link Between Farm Antibiotics and Human Illness

Among the many strains they found was one known as H22, which was present on chicken meat and in people, and carried genetic markers indicating it had occupied the guts of poultry first, and then adapted to humans.This is what earlier studies of EXPECs on meat and in humans lacked: evidence that meat strains and human infections were linked, not just in time and location, but in movement from animal to person.