Why Hurricane Michael's Storm Surge Is So High

Why Hurricane Michael's Storm Surge Is So High

It’s measured as the height of the water above the normal predicted tide, and how bad it is depends mainly on three things: wind speed, shoreline shape, and timing.https://twitter.com/NHC_Surge/status/1049770886943924224Typically, the strongest surge occurs with the eyewall of the storm.

How Hurricane Michael Got Super Big, Super Fast

How Hurricane Michael Got Super Big, Super Fast

Now, to be fair, most Atlantic cat-4 and cat-5 storms go through rapid intensification; the dangerous ones do it near the coastline, just before landfall.More intense hurricanes are one of the central predictions scientists have made about Earth’s changing climate.

When We Almost Stopped Climate Change

When We Almost Stopped Climate Change

And if you’re interested in advertising with “The Daily,” write to us at thedaily-ads@nytimes.com.How do I listen to ‘The Daily’?July 16, 2018Nathaniel Rich contributed reporting.“When We Almost Stopped Climate Change” was produced by Clare Toeniskoetter, with help from Michael Simon Johnson, and edited by Paige Cowett and Lisa Tobin.“The Daily” is produced by Theo Balcomb, Annie Brown, Jessica Cheung, Paige Cowett, Lynsea Garrison, Michael Simon Johnson, Andy Mills, Rachel Quester, Ike Sriskandarajah and Clare Toeniskoetter, with editing help from Larissa Anderson.