The Imperfect Truth About Finding Facts in a World of Fakes

The Imperfect Truth About Finding Facts in a World of Fakes

Before the online era, you would need to shell out a lot of money to print a fake newspaper, or it would look like an obvious counterfeit. We need to find digital equivalents, especially to verify the time and place of documents, photographs, and videos, as well as to authenticate individual identities.

Digging Into Self-Driving Data and More Car News This Week

Digging Into Self-Driving Data and More Car News This Week

Digging Into Self-Driving Data and More Car News This Week This week, the California DMV released the disengagement reports every self-driving developer testing in state must file to the DMV.

Before There Was Internet Paranoia, There Was Lyndon LaRouche

Before There Was Internet Paranoia, There Was Lyndon LaRouche

News spread on Tuesday that Lyndon LaRouche, the dogged global conspiracy theorist and fringe United States presidential candidate, died at age 96 . A couple years back, this question of the internet’s empowering conspiracy believers centered on an emerging community of self-identified “targeted individuals.”.

Don't Blame Fortnite for Activision-Blizzard's Layoffs

Don't Blame Fortnite for Activision-Blizzard's Layoffs

There is a Fortnite Effect, yes, but it's not being caused by the game's continuing utter dominance—the source is a lack of original thinking among developers and investors both. Activision-Blizzard announced that it would pour money into its games, increasing development staff up to 20 percent over the next year.

An Apple-Hacking Teen, SIM-Swap Indictments, and More Security News This Week

An Apple-Hacking Teen, SIM-Swap Indictments, and More Security News This Week

Security News This Week: A Teen Won't Tell Apple How He Hacked MacOS Giulia Marchi/Getty Images It's frankly hard, at the end of this long week, to devote much mental energy to any news that's not Jeff Bezos going to war with the National Enquirer , but stay with us!

Surprisingly, Disney Is Happy With EA's Star Wars Games

Surprisingly, Disney Is Happy With EA's Star Wars Games

Also, sales numbers are in for the hottest new battle royale title around and there's a Halo theme park in the works.

Disney Won't Stop Deadpool From Dropping F-Bombs

Disney Won't Stop Deadpool From Dropping F-Bombs

The Walking Dead is getting (another) new season, Anya Taylor-Joy and Edgar Wright are teaming up, and Disney is going to keep the Deadpool movies R-rated.

15 Moments That Defined Facebook's First 15 Years

15 Moments That Defined Facebook's First 15 Years

"Nothing you do is being broadcast; rather, it is being shared with people who care about what you do—your friends." Days later, Zuckerberg backtracked in an open letter, saying, "We really messed this one up," and announcing new controls users would have over what stories populated their News Feeds.

The Batman Will Hit Theaters in 2021—Minus Ben Affleck

The Batman Will Hit Theaters in 2021—Minus Ben Affleck

This week: Batman gets a release date, Oscar Isaac might be going to Dune , Universal has a new plan for its monster mashup, and Zack Snyder is going back to making zombie flicks.

The ‘Complete’ Cancer Cure Story Is Both Bogus and Tragic

The ‘Complete’ Cancer Cure Story Is Both Bogus and Tragic

What’s Happening On Monday, The Jerusalem Post , a centrist Israeli newspaper, published an online story profiling a small company called Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies that has been working on a potential anti-cancer drug cocktail since 2000.

Media's Fatal Flaw: Ignoring the Mistakes of Newspapers

Media's Fatal Flaw: Ignoring the Mistakes of Newspapers

The accidental brilliance of the newspaper business model is it commoditized all those information needs to an audience that, pre-internet, had no other choice. Rebuilding local media starts with figuring out what people truly want and need from their news, now that the excess has been stripped away.

Uber Wants Self-Driving Scooters and More Car News This Week

Uber Wants Self-Driving Scooters and More Car News This Week

Uber Wants Self-Driving Scooters and More Car News This Week A new analysis estimates American cities will only be able to keep up with electric vehicle charging demand if they have to build 20 percent more chargers every year between now and 2025.

Facebook Cracks Down on Networks of Fake Pages and Groups

Facebook Cracks Down on Networks of Fake Pages and Groups

If a troll runs two fake news pages but only one of them violates Facebook’s policies, the company can’t take down the other until it breaks the rules as well.

Security News This Week: Did Russia Take Another Shot at Hacking the DNC?

Security News This Week: Did Russia Take Another Shot at Hacking the DNC?

Attribution is a tricky business, and the DNC didn’t provide much specific evidence to back up their claims of Russian involvement, but it lines up with a previous wave of Russian spearphishing noted by security firm FireEye last fall. This one belongs to the Oklahoma Department of Securities, which left millions of files open to public access.

Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News

Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News

Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News Bell unveiled its 6,000-pound Nexus craft at CES. The lidar company AEye's CES display came with Nerf guns.

Security News This Week: Employees May Have Snooped on Ring Security Camera Feeds

Security News This Week: Employees May Have Snooped on Ring Security Camera Feeds

This exposed the fact that though carriers insist they don’t sell location tracking data to third parties, they, uh, still do. That Massive German Politician Hack Was the Work of a 20-Year-Old Last week, politicians and celebrities in Germany were doxxed, their intimate information splashing out for all to see.

After Trump's Speech, Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers

After Trump's Speech, Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers

After Trump's Speech, Twitter Fact-Checks the Fact-Checkers Last night after President Trump's address on border security, an Associated Press tweet claimed that, in placing blame for the government shutdown, "it takes two to tango." Twitter thought otherwise.

Jeff Bezos' Divorce Could Mean Big Changes for Amazon

Jeff Bezos' Divorce Could Mean Big Changes for Amazon

In today’s installment: Jeff Bezos' divorce will likely impact Amazon; the forthcoming Dune film is spicing up its cast; and Lady Gaga's streaming catalog is losing one of her most controversial hits.

Tesla’s Price Cut and More Car News From This Week

Tesla’s Price Cut and More Car News From This Week

Required Reading News from elsewhere on the internet In the Rearview Essential stories from WIRED’s canon Back in 2016, WIRED explored how the internet got all wrapped up in city transportation systems.

The 'Twinning' Fad, the Weather Channel, and More Security News

The 'Twinning' Fad, the Weather Channel, and More Security News

Security News This Week: The 'Twinning' Site Leaked Selfies WIRED; Momoa by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images, Chewbacca by DPA Picture Alliance Archive/Alamy You know what they say, the first hacks of January set the tone for the rest of year.

2018 Had the Biggest Box Office Ever. Thanks, Black Panther

2018 Had the Biggest Box Office Ever. Thanks, Black Panther

Ticket Masters The box office reached an all-time high in 2018 , earning nearly $12 billion in revenue in the United States alone—and eclipsing a previous record set in 2016.

The Silver Lining in Apple’s Very Bad iPhone News

The Silver Lining in Apple’s Very Bad iPhone News

And while Apple’s battery scandal of a year ago was a black mark for the company, it at least reminded Apple owners that they didn’t necessarily need a new iPhone.

The Year the Alt-Right Went Underground

The Year the Alt-Right Went Underground

But in its place has come something shadowier and far older: an underground white supremacist movement operating on society’s fringes, and a culture that disavows the racists while quietly mainstreaming their ideas.

The Day I Found Out My Life Was Hanging by a Thread

The Day I Found Out My Life Was Hanging by a Thread

Mighty AI’s weekly operations meeting would be getting started at 10:15, so I had a lot of calls to make.I phoned our board members one at a time, sharing the news with those I reached.

Security News This Week: Hackers Hit NASA Before the Holidays

Security News This Week: Hackers Hit NASA Before the Holidays

Three days after the magazine contacted Amazon, the company reached out to the customer whose private information had been erroneously shared with a stranger and explained that a staff member had made a “one-time error” that breached his privacy.

The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected

The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected

Goodnight Stories didn’t emerge spontaneously, though; they began to test it, six months before launching their now famed Kickstarter campaign, using the simplest of internet technologies: email.Crucial Tech for an Author: EmailIn 2014, The New York Times had 6.5 million subscribers to its email newsletters.

Hacking Diplomatic Cables Is Expected. Exposing Them Is Not

Hacking Diplomatic Cables Is Expected. Exposing Them Is Not

It is news that they totally got caught, though," says Dave Aitel, a former NSA researcher who is now chief security technology officer at the secure infrastructure firm Cyxtera.In the attack Area 1 identified, hackers first breached the European communication network known as Coreu in April 2015, and actively exfiltrated data until last week.

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

But lots of people in Trump's orbit—and the president himself—have plenty of cause for alarm.It also looks increasingly like China was behind the years-long Marriott hack that impacted 500 million people, which in turn means that 2014 was a full-on assault on the US by state-sponsored Chinese hackers.

Facebook Exposed 6.8 Million Users' Photos to Cap Off a Terrible 2018

Facebook Exposed 6.8 Million Users' Photos to Cap Off a Terrible 2018

While a hacker gaining access to bank account numbers and unencrypted passwords would certainly qualify, privacy lawyers say that photos exposed through an API to developers seems like legitimately murkier territory."There’s a lot of anger and finger pointing and frustration about how do we still have security bugs and privacy bugs, and how are these things still happening?"Alex Rice, HackerOneMeanwhile, Facebook has yet to fully resolve the issue.

Sonic the Hedgehog Is Ready For His Closeup—and It's Weird

Sonic the Hedgehog Is Ready For His Closeup—and It's Weird

Sonic the Hedgehog Is Ready For His Closeup—and It's WeirdSega's speedy blue blur is about to race his way into film, but why are his legs so long?SegaThis week, as the year begins to wind down, the news certainly doesn't.

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