Why a Grape Turns Into a Fireball in a Microwave

Why a Grape Turns Into a Fireball in a Microwave

A common misconception is that the microwave acts on the grape from the outside in, like frozen meat defrosting, says physicist Pablo Bianucci of Concordia University, who worked on grape simulations included in a paper that appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

The Imperfect Truth About Finding Facts in a World of Fakes

The Imperfect Truth About Finding Facts in a World of Fakes

Before the online era, you would need to shell out a lot of money to print a fake newspaper, or it would look like an obvious counterfeit. We need to find digital equivalents, especially to verify the time and place of documents, photographs, and videos, as well as to authenticate individual identities.

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

The search company champions self-regulation, highlighting how it has chosen not to offer a general-purpose facial recognition service—as Microsoft and Amazon do—due to concerns it could be used to “carry out extreme surveillance.” The paper also says Google has limited some of the AI research code it has released, to reduce the risk of misuse.

Media's Fatal Flaw: Ignoring the Mistakes of Newspapers

Media's Fatal Flaw: Ignoring the Mistakes of Newspapers

The accidental brilliance of the newspaper business model is it commoditized all those information needs to an audience that, pre-internet, had no other choice. Rebuilding local media starts with figuring out what people truly want and need from their news, now that the excess has been stripped away.

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

Looking at streams on Alaska’s Kodiak Island, the researchers found that the varied timing of salmon migrations likely matters as much as abundance. Previous research found that this variance in migration timing among streams matters a lot to brown bears and other wildlife that feed on salmon.

Exploding Stars May Have Killed Off Prehistoric Predators

Exploding Stars May Have Killed Off Prehistoric Predators

“They are in a sweet spot for affecting ground-based life.” Melott hypothesized that a supernova around 2.6 million years ago would have increased the flow of muons streaming through the atmosphere several hundred times over.

A Crocodile-Like Robot Helps Solve a 300-Million-Year Mystery

A Crocodile-Like Robot Helps Solve a 300-Million-Year Mystery

But today, in an epically multidisciplinary paper in Nature , researchers detail how they married paleontology, biomechanics, computer simulations, live animal demonstrations, and even an Orobates robot to determine that the ancient critter probably walked in a far more advanced way than was previously believed possible.

How Do You Publish the Work of a Scientific Villain?

How Do You Publish the Work of a Scientific Villain?

A paper describing this work is reportedly under peer review, and a second one about additional Crispr experiments in human embryos was rejected by an international journal over ethical and scientific concerns, STAT reported Monday morning.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to CrisprScientists are beginning to grapple with the very real possibility that He’s work may never be awarded publication status, along with its attendant sheen of legitimacy.

Travel a Familiar World Created by a Copy Machine

Travel a Familiar World Created by a Copy Machine

But Dominique Teufen’s Toshiba e-Studio 255 is lucky: It gets to see the world.Snow-capped mountains, shimmering beaches, a glacial lake: These breathtaking scenes aren't exactly real—Teufen creates them with found materials on the glass—but that's part of the fun.Related StoriesLaura MalloneeNorman Rockwell's Four Freedoms Recast for Modern AmericaMichael HardyClose Encounters at AlienCon, Where Ancient Aliens Fans MeetLaura MalloneeThe Secret Tools Magicians Use to Fool You"When people look at these landscapes, they think they're photographed," Teufen says.

Airport WiFi Is Safe, Plus Travel Scoops You May Have Missed

Airport WiFi Is Safe, Plus Travel Scoops You May Have Missed

So please be gentle with me as I introduce the theme of this car roundup, which is holiday plane travel.For this greatest of travel weeks, we're reviewing all the juicy, fun here-to-there stories we wrote in the last year or so, about building the most audacious flying machine ever, about staying healthy on your next flight, and about surprisingly safe airport Wi-Fi. We’ve got some important plane travel gear.

Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Dr Bostock first started work on the database 10 years ago when she was looking for information for a project that required her to look up archived paper files dating back to the 1970s and then digitise them.

The DIY Tinkerers Harnessing the Power of Artificial Intelligence

The DIY Tinkerers Harnessing the Power of Artificial Intelligence

“High school students can now do things that the best researchers in the world could not have done a few years ago,” says Andrew Ng, an AI researcher and entrepreneur who has led big projects at Google and China’s Baidu.The A.I. IssueClive ThompsonHow to Teach Artificial Intelligence Some Common SenseJessi HempelFei-Fei Li's Quest to Make AI Better for HumanityShaun RavivThe Genius Neuroscientist Who Might Hold the Key to True AIPeople like Ng have big hopes for the amateur AI explosion: They want it to spread the technology’s potential far from Silicon Valley, physically and culturally, to see what happens when tech outsiders “train” neural networks according to their own priorities and ways of seeing the world.

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

The first effects of the now Category 1 Hurricane Florence are already being felt in the Carolinas, where the storm is expected to make landfall later today, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

This is how UN scientists are preparing for the end of capitalism

This is how UN scientists are preparing for the end of capitalism

And the biggest “sink cost”, of course, is climate change: “Sink costs are also rising; economies have used up the capacity of planetary ecosystems to handle the waste generated by energy and material use.

Emmy Endorsement: In Praise of “Barbershop,” the Other Genius 'Atlanta' Episode

Emmy Endorsement: In Praise of “Barbershop,” the Other Genius 'Atlanta' Episode

Still, there’s another Atlanta episode in the Emmy running this year, one so stylistically at odds with “Teddy Perkins” that it proves just how elastic this show can be.Related StoriesPia CeresThe 15 New Fall Shows We're Most Excited AboutJason ParhamHow Atlanta, the Most Innovative Show on TV, Reinvented Itself AgainBrian RafteryI'm Not Here to Make Friends: The Rise and Fall of the Supercut VideoDirected by Donald Glover, and written by nominee Stefani Robinson, “Barbershop” opens with the increasingly fame-wary rapper Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry) slumped in a chair, awaiting the arrival of Bibby, his long-time barber.

'Very worrying' Endless summers to strike UK and USA due to global warming warn scientists

'Very worrying' Endless summers to strike UK and USA due to global warming warn scientists

SUMMER weather patterns are increasingly set to get stuck in Europe, North America and parts of Asia in future after a new climate study revealed how Arctic warming is creating global heatwaves and torrential rainfall which can have a dangerous and devastating impact on human health.

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The megafires paper is one of two recently released studies based on data from NASA’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment, or ABoVE, that will help scientists better understand and predict both short- and long-term changes in the ecosystems of Alaska and Northern Canada.

Ukip MEP sparks outrage with report denying human role in climate change

Ukip MEP sparks outrage with report denying human role in climate change

Ukip MEP Stuart Agnew’s report attributes climate change to cosmic ray fluctuations, sunspot activity and ocean currents, among other things. Green MEP Molly Scott Cato said their choice of Agnew, a Norfolk farmer, as parliamentary rapporteur by the agriculture committee, was a “truly scandalous” fiasco that illustrated a growing populist threat.

Warming ocean to alter ecosystems and affect fisheries by end of century, says NIWA scientists

Warming ocean to alter ecosystems and affect fisheries by end of century, says NIWA scientists

Rapid warming of the ocean near Tasmania may provide a good indication of how the water around New Zealand will change as the planet warms, say NIWA scientists.

NIWA seaweed scientist tackling global climate change issue

NIWA seaweed scientist tackling global climate change issue

Dr Wendy Nelson, a principal scientist at NIWA Wellington, co-authored a paper that explores the potential of commercial seaweed farming in mitigating global carbon dioxide levels, a key greenhouse gas responsible for man-made climate change.

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

And two of these factors — water depth and structural complexity — are easily and cheaply identifiable by somebody managing a reef. This paper gives reef managers an easily measurable tool that can be used to predict recovery and resilience.