Capturing the Aftermath of Wildfires in France

Capturing the Aftermath of Wildfires in France

"The forest stands its ground, fights back, and survives," he says.Related StoriesLaura MalloneeThe 'Liquidators' Who Risked It All to Clean Up ChernobylLaura MalloneeHow That Magical Jack Dorsey–Alex Jones Photo HappenedLaura MalloneeA Cross-Country Road Trip, Courtesy of Google Street ViewFrance lost 60,000 acres to wildfires last year, most in the southern Mediterranean rim.

How Los Angeles Is Helping Lead the Fight Against Climate Change

How Los Angeles Is Helping Lead the Fight Against Climate Change

Garcetti sat down with WIRED for two interviews, which we have combined and condensed, to talk about how to turn LA into a greentech testbed, why cities have to compete in order to save the world, and what the city can learn from its infamous water wars.Matt Simon: In what way are cities uniquely positioned to be leaders on climate change?Eric Garcetti: There's never been more people living in cities, and many of them control directly the most important national assets, like ports and airports and utilities.

Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles

Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles

In some areas with high levels of plastic pollution, like the Mediterranean and the southern Atlantic Ocean, turtles are unable to avoid the debris, while in other areas it is less of a problem.“We know individual turtles are dying, but we don’t know yet whether enough turtles are dying to cause population decline, and that’s where we’re heading to now,” Dr. Hamann said.Jennifer Lynch, a research biologist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Hawaii, took issue with the way the study measured vulnerability to plastic.In her own research, she has seen animals that aren’t harmed after swallowing 300 pieces of plastic, so she doesn’t believe that 14 pieces pose such a high risk of death.