Uber Hails a Ride to Wall Street, and More Car News This Week

Uber Hails a Ride to Wall Street, and More Car News This Week

Also in transpo people and companies trying to prove themselves: Tesla goes off-menu for the $35,000 Model 3, ostensibly to shore up cash and streamline production; another industry insider says, yes, self-driving car hype got ahead of reality; and Audi argues its slightly dispiriting E-tron range numbers matter little compared to its luxury features.

Tesla Shifts Gears, Again, and Some Fans Are Losing Patience

Tesla Shifts Gears, Again, and Some Fans Are Losing Patience

So when CEO Elon Musk announced in late February that the carmaker would finally start delivering its more affordable Standard and Standard Plus Model 3 options, O’Roak at first ordered a Standard Plus, paying $3,000 extra for the electric carmaker’s semi-automated Autopilot feature.

Cities for the people

Cities for the people

Singapore has implemented what Jan Gehl calls “human-scale design.” The bottom-up design of neighborhoods empowers citizens and emphasizes diversity, thereby preventing the emergence of poverty ghettoes through mixed-income housing, along with access to high-quality public transport, health, and education.

What Will Be the Right Price to Cut Congestion in New York?

What Will Be the Right Price to Cut Congestion in New York?

Set a lower price, and make it too inexpensive and convenient to drive, and the city will raise lots of money for subways—but not relieve much congestion. Fortunately for New York, a bunch of other cities have used congestion pricing to reduce traffic and raise money for years, with mixed success.

Cracking open the green bond market – What’s next?

Cracking open the green bond market – What’s next?

“IFC has been issuing green bonds since 2010, and we helped propel the growth of the market in 2013 with two $1-billion benchmark issuances that were the largest at the time,” said Flora Chao, Global Head of Funding, IFC Treasury.

The Real Choice You Make When You Subscribe to Apple Services

The Real Choice You Make When You Subscribe to Apple Services

If there’s anything that’s clear from Apple’s event Monday, it’s that the maker of premium tech products is trying to sell people on its vision for the future of services—a seemingly effortless lifestyle filled with always-accessible media, exclusive video games, and cash-back incentives from a literal titanium credit card.

The Age of Congestion Pricing May Finally Be Upon Us

The Age of Congestion Pricing May Finally Be Upon Us

Los Angeles Metro officials, searching for a way to pay for 28 ambitious transportation projects by the time it hosts the Olympics in 2028, have floated a suite of congestion pricing ideas : charging drivers per miles traveled, or turning carpool lanes to toll lanes, or levying fees on those entering busy neighborhoods during busy times.

Forget the New Galaxy S10. These Phones Are Better Deals

Forget the New Galaxy S10. These Phones Are Better Deals

The standard Galaxy S10 starts at $900 and comes with a new triple rear camera, more RAM, and a slightly larger battery.

Sony's PlayStation Classic is a Great Deal Right Now (Only $40)

Sony's PlayStation Classic is a Great Deal Right Now (Only $40)

Sony After just a couple months on the market, Sony's PlayStation Classic has fallen to a more reasonable price. Retro Fun and Frustration I didn't write a full review of the PlayStation Classic last fall, but I did spend a good amount of time with it.

The MoviePass Reboot Is Here. But Will Moviegoers Want It?

The MoviePass Reboot Is Here. But Will Moviegoers Want It?

Starting in January, MoviePass will roll out a new pricing scheme that will allow you to pay as little as $10 or as much as $25 per month for three movie tickets, depending on where you live and how many restrictions you can cope with.If people sign up, MoviePass will finally have a business model that's within shouting distance of survival.

Midterm Election Voters Shot Down a Carbon Tax, But It'll Rise Again

Midterm Election Voters Shot Down a Carbon Tax, But It'll Rise Again

Initiative 1631 was technically a fee, not a tax; It would’ve charged many emitters $15 per metric ton of carbon, increasing every year until emissions declined—and the money would pay for green infrastructure like clean power generation, environmental remediation, and projects in communities most affected by pollution.