Amazon Joins Microsoft's Call for Rules on Facial Recognition

Amazon Joins Microsoft's Call for Rules on Facial Recognition

In the post, Michael Punke, vice president of global public policy at Amazon’s cloud division, AWS, wrote that the company “supports the creation of a national legislative framework covering facial recognition through video and photographic monitoring on public or commercial premises.” Amazon has been pressured by civil rights groups after tests by academics and the ACLU found that Rekognition’s image analysis and face recognition functions are less accurate for black people.

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

Google Says It Wants Rules for the Use of AI—Kinda, Sorta

The search company champions self-regulation, highlighting how it has chosen not to offer a general-purpose facial recognition service—as Microsoft and Amazon do—due to concerns it could be used to “carry out extreme surveillance.” The paper also says Google has limited some of the AI research code it has released, to reduce the risk of misuse.

San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

“This is the first piece of legislation that I’ve seen that really takes facial recognition technology as serious as it is warranted and treats it as uniquely dangerous.” Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University Privacy laws in Texas and Illinois require anyone recording biometric data, including face scans and fingerprints, to give people notice and obtain their consent.

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

Security News This Week: Taylor Swift's Facial Recognition Scans Crowds for Stalkers

But lots of people in Trump's orbit—and the president himself—have plenty of cause for alarm.It also looks increasingly like China was behind the years-long Marriott hack that impacted 500 million people, which in turn means that 2014 was a full-on assault on the US by state-sponsored Chinese hackers.

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

Microsoft Wants to Stop AI's 'Race to the Bottom'

But Microsoft president Brad Smith took it one step further on Thursday, asking governments to regulate the use of facial-recognition technology to ensure it does not invade personal privacy or become a tool for discrimination or surveillance.Tech companies are often forced to choose between social responsibility and profits, but the consequences of facial recognition are too dire for business as usual, Smith said.

Facial Recognition Tech Is Ready for Its Post-Phone Future

Facial Recognition Tech Is Ready for Its Post-Phone Future

Eventually, several police departments decided to stop using it."The concerns I had a year ago were really that this separation of the different uses of the technology wouldn’t happen, that people would see facial recognition as this highly convenient offering and thus be more willing to accept it in other circumstances, like banking or ad tracking in a retail store, or by law enforcement," says Garvie.

Facial Recognition, a British Airways Hack, and More Security News This Week

Facial Recognition, a British Airways Hack, and More Security News This Week

Security News this Week: IBM Made Cops a Tool to Search Surveillance Video by Skin ColorCasey Chin/Getty ImagesTech went to Washington this week, and their biggest problems followed them.Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg faced Congress, and though Google CEO Larry Paige was invited, he declined to make the trip—a move that didn’t ingratiate him with Congressional watchdog Mark Warner.