Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

“But we could use aquaculture to replace some of those water filtration benefits, and at the same time grow food.” In places where excess nutrients are a problem, like the Chesapeake Bay, shellfish aquaculture could even help offset the negative environmental impacts of other industries.

One Square Meter of Prairie

One Square Meter of Prairie

Photo © Chris Helzer / TNC I was thrilled to photograph two different monarch butterflies inside the plot, the more so because of their current population declines.

We Know Exactly How to Stop Wildfires—With Money

We Know Exactly How to Stop Wildfires—With Money

Except if you don’t reduce the number of trees, and if you then also try to put out every fire, and allow runaway climate change to make droughts and heat waves worse … the boreal forests of North America will continue to literally go up in smoke, erasing the landscape and spewing climate-changing carbon into the atmosphere.Everyone pretty much agrees on how to deal with our new Burning World: Stop trying to suppress fire and start managing that land to restore a more natural (less intense) fire regime.

Hundreds of Seals Are Dying on the New England Coast

Hundreds of Seals Are Dying on the New England Coast

5.Marine Mammals of MaineIt is theoretically possible though unlikely for viruses to jump species, Dr. Goldstein noted, and dogs have been known to give distemper to seals, though the opposite has not been seen.[To report a stranded or dead seal, call 866-755-NOAA.]“It’s hard when you see people intervene with animals that are not doing well,” said Ms. Doughty, whose team has responded to more than 400 stranded animals over the last month, including 30 on Sept.

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A new NASA-led study using data from the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) shows that carbon in Alaska's North Slope tundra ecosystems spends about 13 percent less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago.

To Heal Wounds, Cells Time-Travel Back to a Fetal State

To Heal Wounds, Cells Time-Travel Back to a Fetal State

Instead, the cells of the damaged tissue turn the clock back all the way to a more fetal state, tapping into the proliferative power that once characterized development — and a program thought to have long gone silent.Atom Bombs and Self-Renewing CellsIn the early 1900s, scientists theorized that the specific blood cell types they’d learned to distinguish from one another under a microscope — red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets — came from a common, more primitive source: a stem cell.

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

While barn owls and western meadowlarks were “losers” during the drought, killdeer and greater roadrunners were “winners.” The blunt-nosed leopard lizard suffered; the side-blotched lizard came up in the world.“The drought kind of knocked down the species that were dominating and allowed the underdogs to do better and stay in the system,” says wildlife ecologist Laura Prugh of the University of Washington, lead author on the new paper in Nature Climate Change.For all the winners and losers, nearly three quarters of species weren’t strongly affected by the drought.

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

Building on a large body of existing research, they divided natural carbon sinks into 20 different pathways and then calculated both their potential for emissions reductions and the associated costs.

New Science Shows Seagrass Meadows Suppress Pathogens

New Science Shows Seagrass Meadows Suppress Pathogens

It was a rough bout of illness while she and her colleagues were studying corals in Indonesia that first focused Nature Conservancy NatureNet Science Fellow Joleah Lamb’s attention on the disease-mitigating possibilities of seagrass meadows.