Google-Funded Study Finds Cash Beats Typical Development Aid

Google-Funded Study Finds Cash Beats Typical Development Aid

It’s a contrarian idea that questions conventional thinking about international aid, it has low overhead, it’s easily scalable using mobile phones, and it’s measurable.Faye, the GiveDirectly cofounder, called the study “the first ever A/B test for USAID.” Zeitlin, the Georgetown professor and coauthor of the study, says this research aligns with Silicon Valley’s interest in disruptive ideas because it questions the effectiveness of traditional aid programs.A recent cash-transfer study showed early gains disappearing over time.

Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles

Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles

In some areas with high levels of plastic pollution, like the Mediterranean and the southern Atlantic Ocean, turtles are unable to avoid the debris, while in other areas it is less of a problem.“We know individual turtles are dying, but we don’t know yet whether enough turtles are dying to cause population decline, and that’s where we’re heading to now,” Dr. Hamann said.Jennifer Lynch, a research biologist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Hawaii, took issue with the way the study measured vulnerability to plastic.In her own research, she has seen animals that aren’t harmed after swallowing 300 pieces of plastic, so she doesn’t believe that 14 pieces pose such a high risk of death.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

“The large amount of rain that is going to come out of a tropical storm or hurricane anyway fell in the same place over a long period of time.”To analyze the changes in translation speeds, James Kossin, a climate scientist with the National Centers for Environmental Information at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tapped into a global data set on past tropical storms.

Here's How to Make the Sahara Desert Green Again

Here's How to Make the Sahara Desert Green Again

But this study is among the first to model how wind and solar farms would affect the Sahara, all while considering how growing green plants and trees would respond to these changes, said Li, who started the study while a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland.

Warming oceans are changing the world's rainfall | John Abraham

Warming oceans are changing the world's rainfall | John Abraham

A new study finds that warming in the Atlantic Ocean is changing rain patterns in the Amazon Previous researchers who have looked at the Amazon and its changing precipitation have found that the southern part of the rainforest has experienced a long-term increase in rainfall.

Here's Why There Are Hundreds of Ancient, Mummified Penguins in Antarctica

Here's Why There Are Hundreds of Ancient, Mummified Penguins in Antarctica

Rather, these penguins, who were mummified by the cold, dry Antarctica environment, likely died from weather on the opposite end of the spectrum: two extremely rainy and snowy events that happened over the past 1,000 years, a new study finds.

Key internet connections and locations at risk from rising seas

Key internet connections and locations at risk from rising seas

Data centers are built on land, and most of the physical elements of the internet – such as the cables that connect households to internet services and the fiber optic strands carrying data from one city to another – are buried in plastic conduit under the dirt.

Climate change warning: Sea levels rising even FASTER as ice caps melt

Climate change warning: Sea levels rising even FASTER as ice caps melt

GETTYA two metre jump could see a host of major cities be partially submergedCo-author John Fasullo, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said: "This study highlights the important role that can be played by satellite records in validating climate model projections.”If the calculations are correct, it would mean that sea levels could rise by almost one metre by 2100, which would be devastating for island countries around the globe.

Wind and solar power plants in Sahara could turn desert green

Wind and solar power plants in Sahara could turn desert green

Scientists predict that when sufficiently large arrays of wind turbines and solar panels are installed, their presence could change the reflectivity of the land and movement of air currents.

The Bugs Are Coming, and They’ll Want More of Our Food

The Bugs Are Coming, and They’ll Want More of Our Food

Worldwide, insect pests consume up to 20 percent of the plants that humans grow for food, and that amount will increase as global warming makes bugs hungrier, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.That could encourage farmers to use more pesticides, which could cause further environmental harm, scientists said.For every degree Celsius (two degrees Fahrenheit) that temperatures rise above the global historical average, the amount of wheat, corn, and rice lost to insects will increase by 10 to 25 percent, the study says.

‘Devastating’ bleaching of Great Barrier Reef hitting deep water corals harder than previously estimated, study shows

‘Devastating’ bleaching of Great Barrier Reef hitting deep water corals harder than previously estimated, study shows

The Great Barrier Reef harbours extensive areas of deep coral reefs which are much more difficult to study and were previously considered a refuge from higher water temperatures near the surface.

You’ve Heard of Outsourced Jobs, but Outsourced Pollution? It’s Real, and Tough to Tally Up.

You’ve Heard of Outsourced Jobs, but Outsourced Pollution? It’s Real, and Tough to Tally Up.

If you included all the global emissions produced in the course of making things like the imported steel used in London’s skyscrapers and cars, then Britain’s total carbon footprint has actually increased slightly over that time.“It’s a huge problem” said Ali Hasanbeigi, a research scientist and C.E.O. of Global Efficiency Intelligence, an energy and environmental consulting firm.

Heatwave warning: Soaring temperatures to kill tens of thousands in the future

Heatwave warning: Soaring temperatures to kill tens of thousands in the future

Heatwave warning: Soaring temperatures to kill tens of thousands in the future HEATWAVES will kill people in their tens of thousands in the near future unless humanity can find a way to adapt to soaring global temperatures, researchers have found.

Melting Arctic Could Rapidly Unlock 'Deep Carbon' Buried in Permafrost

Melting Arctic Could Rapidly Unlock 'Deep Carbon' Buried in Permafrost

Arctic lakes could release a vast reservoir of ancient carbon buried deep under the permanently frozen ground, or permafrost, thereby accelerating climate change.

There's a Huge 'Archive' of Heat Hiding Under Earth's Arctic Ice

There's a Huge 'Archive' of Heat Hiding Under Earth's Arctic Ice

The trapping effect is the result of the Arctic Ocean's distinct layers of water, said lead study author Mary-Louise Timmermans, a professor of geology and geophysics at Yale University.

Climate Change Could Drastically Change Ecosystems Around the World

Climate Change Could Drastically Change Ecosystems Around the World

The fossil records show that the world is very sensitive to temperature changes, which suggests that if fossil fuel emissions continue unabated, accelerated warming could lead to dramatic transformations in vegetation and ecosystems around the globe, the team wrote today (Aug. 30) in the journal Science.

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The megafires paper is one of two recently released studies based on data from NASA’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment, or ABoVE, that will help scientists better understand and predict both short- and long-term changes in the ecosystems of Alaska and Northern Canada.

Local winds play a key role in some megafires – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Local winds play a key role in some megafires – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Although drought and overgrown forests are often blamed for major fires in the western United States, new research using unique NASA before-and-after data from a megafire site indicates that highly localized winds sometimes play a much larger role -- creating large, destructive fires even when regional winds are weak.

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A new NASA-led study using data from the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) shows that carbon in Alaska's North Slope tundra ecosystems spends about 13 percent less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago.

NASA finds Amazon drought leaves long legacy of damage – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

NASA finds Amazon drought leaves long legacy of damage – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A single season of drought in the Amazon rainforest can reduce the forest's carbon dioxide absorption for years after the rains return, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.

A world on fire – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A world on fire – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The red points overlaid on the image designate those areas that by using thermal bands detect actively burning fires. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview application provides the capability to interactively browse over 700 global, full-resolution satellite imagery layers and then download the underlying data.

Earth quickly heading for 'point of no return' unless we takes immediate action, climate scientists warn

Earth quickly heading for 'point of no return' unless we takes immediate action, climate scientists warn

The researchers also say that the deadline to stop global warming reaching 1.5C has already passed, unless we commit to radical action now. Without that action, Earth will fall past the point of no return and it will be impossible to stop global warming, they warn.

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

“In some temperate countries, insect pest damage to crops is projected to rise sharply as temperatures continue to climb, putting serious pressure on grain producers,” said Professor Joshua Tewksbury, co-lead author of the study and a research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Fish populations could rise in warming climate with better management

Fish populations could rise in warming climate with better management

Better management of fisheries and fishing rights around the world could increase profits and leave more fish in the sea as long as measures to meet climate obligations are taken, new research has found.

Wildfire Smoke Is Smothering the US—Even Where You Don't Expect It

Wildfire Smoke Is Smothering the US—Even Where You Don't Expect It

By 2050, an estimated 83.7 million people over the age of 65 will call the US home, nearly doubling the current population—and a paper published in April found that bad smoke days during California’s 2015 wildfire season caused spikes in emergency room visits, with the most pronounced impact on patients over 65.

98.6 Degrees Is a Normal Body Temperature, Right? Not Quite

98.6 Degrees Is a Normal Body Temperature, Right? Not Quite

And it is lowest in the morning."A temperature of 99 at six o’clock in the morning is very abnormal, whereas that same temperature at four o’clock in the afternoon can be totally normal," says Jonathan Hausmann, a rheumatologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who gathered 11,458 temperatures in crowdsourced research using an iPhone app called Feverprints.The study, published online this month in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, refutes the age-old benchmark of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

Nature Could Help Prevent $50 Billion in Flood Damages in the Gulf of Mexico

Nature Could Help Prevent $50 Billion in Flood Damages in the Gulf of Mexico

The resulting analysis shows – for the first time – that the cost effectiveness of nature-based (green), artificial (gray) and policy solutions (like regulations) for reducing risk from storms and sea level rise can be directly compared – quantitatively – (apples to apples, so to speak) to one another across a region as large as the Gulf of Mexico.

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

Q&A with Stephanie Wear: A New Tool to Predict Coral Reef Recovery

And two of these factors — water depth and structural complexity — are easily and cheaply identifiable by somebody managing a reef. This paper gives reef managers an easily measurable tool that can be used to predict recovery and resilience.

What New Science & T.S. Eliot Teach Us About Ocean Acidification

What New Science & T.S. Eliot Teach Us About Ocean Acidification

A new study on the Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is one of the first to expose the effect that ocean acidification is already having on coral reefs. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

Making Nature’s Value Visible (To All): Coral Reef Edition

Making Nature’s Value Visible (To All): Coral Reef Edition

The big takeaway: The countries with the most to gain — in terms of risk reduction — from reef conservation and restoration of their coral reefs are Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Mexico, and Cuba, where annual expected flood savings exceed $400M for each nation.