Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News

Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News

Butt Sensors, Flying Taxis, and More This Week in Car News Bell unveiled its 6,000-pound Nexus craft at CES. The lidar company AEye's CES display came with Nerf guns.

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

Thus when a 29-year-old former bartender of Puerto Rican descent beats a senior Democratic leader of the House, and then proceeds to set the political agenda during her first week in office, it’s more than a cute social media story.

Cabbies Unite! An App Challenges the Uber and Lyft Overlords

Cabbies Unite! An App Challenges the Uber and Lyft Overlords

Itzhak is the head of HERE Mobility, an 18-month-old unit of the mapping company HERE (jointly owned by BMW, Audi, and Daimler) that today announced the launch of an app called SoMo. That’s for “social mobility,” and it’s what Itzhak calls an “open global neutral mobility marketplace,” which is a wordy way of saying, an effort to pull together pretty much every way of getting around that isn’t a ride-hail service.

Bell Reveals a Surprisingly Down-to-Earth Air Taxi

Bell Reveals a Surprisingly Down-to-Earth Air Taxi

That industry is based on the idea that quiet, efficient, and safe air taxis (aka flying cars) with electric power and high-tech control systems will allow safe operation by either computers or human pilots with minimal specialized training.

Tesla's $7,500 Tax Credit Goes Poof, But Buyers May Benefit

Tesla's $7,500 Tax Credit Goes Poof, But Buyers May Benefit

Elon Musk's company just became the first automaker to lose access to the full $7,500 federal tax credit designed to spur the adoption of electric cars. Tesla sold that magic milestone car in July last year, and got another two quarters of full credit for its buyers.

Moving toward green mobility: three countries, three different paths

Moving toward green mobility: three countries, three different paths

To illustrate this, let’s look at three countries that did take concrete measures to cut carbon emissions from transport but opted for three different options: France, Luxembourg, and Norway.

How Amazon, Apple, and Google Played the Tax-Break Game

How Amazon, Apple, and Google Played the Tax-Break Game

How Amazon, Apple, and Google Played the Tax-Break GameApple's existing office in Austin, Texas, a few miles from where the company announced plans to build a new campus.SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty ImagesIt took about 30 minutes for Williamson County commissioners to unanimously approve a roughly $16 million incentive package for Apple Tuesday morning, bringing the total amount the tech giant is likely to receive in exchange for choosing Austin as the site for its newest campus to a cool $41 million.

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

If the thought of holiday traffic next week is already getting you down, then we also have (futuristic) options for getting up and over it.HeadlinesStories you might have missed from WIRED this weekPublic transit is supposed to be equally accessible to anyone, but as Aarian Marshall reports, women pay a “pink transport tax.” In New York City, women pay $36 to $50 extra per month just to get around, mainly due to safety concerns.

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos Won

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos Won

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos WonMark Lennihan/APAfter a 14-month search, Amazon announced Tuesday that it will open a pair of regional offices in two major metropolitan areas where it already has a presence: the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, a borough of New York, and Arlington, Virginia, just outside Washington DC.The decision comes after more than 230 cities submitted bids to be home of the Seattle-based company’s highly anticipated second headquarters, which originally promised to employ 50,000 white-collar workers.

Midterm Election Voters Shot Down a Carbon Tax, But It'll Rise Again

Midterm Election Voters Shot Down a Carbon Tax, But It'll Rise Again

Initiative 1631 was technically a fee, not a tax; It would’ve charged many emitters $15 per metric ton of carbon, increasing every year until emissions declined—and the money would pay for green infrastructure like clean power generation, environmental remediation, and projects in communities most affected by pollution.

San Francisco Tech Billionaires Go to War over Homelessness

San Francisco Tech Billionaires Go to War over Homelessness

In fact, no one will go on the record saying “Screw homeless people, I don’t want to pay any taxes.” But several of the city’s prominent elected officials—all touting solid liberal credentials—oppose Prop C.

Emmanuel Macron under attack over climate change

Emmanuel Macron under attack over climate change

Renewed criticism of the centrist French president’s approach to green issues came as Macron replaced his former environment minister, the TV personality Nicolas Hulot, who quit last week saying the government was in thrall to powerful lobby groups and taking only “mini-steps” that were insufficient to deal with climate change.

Debate: carbon tax, an optical illusion

Debate: carbon tax, an optical illusion

On the French version of the website The Conversation, climate change specialist Christian de Perthuis recently applauded the introduction of the carbon tax in France in 2014 and its gradual increase.

Apple Issuing a Second Green Bond to Finance Clean Energy

Apple Issuing a Second Green Bond to Finance Clean Energy

While companies in recent years have issues tens of billions of dollars in green bonds for projects that cut global-warming emissions, the size of Apple’s first issuance fueled speculation that other companies would follow.