Typhoon Mangkhut: How to Help

Typhoon Mangkhut: How to Help

The northernmost towns of Cagayan are believed to be badly hit and it is still difficult to access these areas as of the moment.”Catholic Relief Services, an international humanitarian organization, said it would provide shelter and distribute food, water and hygiene kits.GlobalGiving, a nonprofit that redistributes funds to vetted, locally focused groups, said the money it raised would pay for emergency supplies including food, water and medicine.The United Methodist Committee on Relief has three disaster management coordinators at the scene of the typhoon, said a committee spokesman, Dan Curran.Presbyterian Disaster Assistance noted that the typhoon would affect an area recently struck by Barijat, a cyclone.

Facebook's AI Can Analyze Memes, but Can It Understand Them?

Facebook's AI Can Analyze Memes, but Can It Understand Them?

Despite the challenges they bring, some social platforms are already using AI to analyze memes, including Facebook, which this week shared details about how it uses a tool called Rosetta to analyze photos and videos that contain text.Facebook says it already uses Rosetta to help automatically detect content that violates things like its hate speech policy.

Carbon research grant “exceptional moment” for scientist

Carbon research grant “exceptional moment” for scientist

Leading the team is NIWA scientist Dr Sara Mikaloff-Fletcher, whose project builds on a pilot study using atmospheric data that uncovered a striking revelation about how much carbon was absorbed by New Zealand’s indigenous forests.

Can Samantha Bee's Comedy Quiz App Gamify Getting out the Vote?

Can Samantha Bee's Comedy Quiz App Gamify Getting out the Vote?

But if the idea is to raise voting behavior, I'm not convinced a trivia app is the best way to do it.'University of Kansas professor Genelle BelmasTraditionally, fewer people cast ballots during midterm elections, and young people have especially low numbers when it comes to voter turnout.

Mission Unstoppable: Inside the All-Female Trek to the North Pole

Mission Unstoppable: Inside the All-Female Trek to the North Pole

It’s 7:30 am, and Briški and four of her teammates have trundled over to the Longyearbyen hospital—or, as it’s called in Norwegian, the Sykehus, a cognate for “sick house”—for physiological testing ahead of the expedition.Like many other public buildings in Longyearbyen, there’s a taxidermied polar bear to greet visitors in the main lobby; the team is gathered in a suite of rooms just outside the surgical unit, which the head nurse says is rarely used by the town’s 2,000 or so residents, aside from major accidents or routine vasectomies.“You’re going to be spitting a lot, but it’s a hell of a lot better than having you pee in the middle of the North Pole,” Audrey Bergouignan says to another expeditioner.

Google Wants to Kill the URL

Google Wants to Kill the URL

And the group won't offer any examples at this point of the types of schemes they are considering.The focus right now, they say, is on identifying all the ways people use URLs to try to find an alternative that will enhance security and identity integrity on the web while also adding convenience for everyday tasks like sharing links on mobile devices."I don’t know what this will look like, because it’s an active discussion in the team right now," says Parisa Tabriz, director of engineering at Chrome.

How Google Chrome Spent a Decade Making the Web More Secure

How Google Chrome Spent a Decade Making the Web More Secure

So the original design of Chrome had two big pieces: auto-updates to make sure you always had the most updated version, and the Chrome sandbox to make sure that if there was a vulnerability that could be exploited we could confine that within the sandbox."'I will be very, very upset if three to five years from now password phishing is still something that we don’t feel we’ve largely solved.'Justin Schuh, Chrome EngineerThese features that set Chrome apart in 2008 are now an industry standard, but at the time Google received criticism for its new browser's big bets.

How Self-Driving Supergroup Aurora Plans to Make Robocars Real

How Self-Driving Supergroup Aurora Plans to Make Robocars Real

But now that it’s looking build up its team (currently about 160-strong), it has published a blog post laying out its approach to robo-driving.WIRED sat down with Urmson, Aurora's CEO, to go over its key points—including the role of machine learning, measuring progress, and proving safety—and how he and his cofounders are handing their second lap around this track.Teaching the MachineIn developing this technology, it’s tempting to fall into what Urmson calls “ladder building.” For example, if you’re working on bringing the car to a stop, you want to keep making it smoother and smoother.

Your Plastic Bags Are Releasing Greenhouse Gases

Your Plastic Bags Are Releasing Greenhouse Gases

To learn what gases plastics were releasing, the research team collected samples of the seven most common types of consumer plastic — both newly produced pieces and fragments fished from the ocean — and monitored the objects' gas production while floating in seawater or exposed to air.

Expedition probes ocean’s smallest organisms for climate answers – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Expedition probes ocean’s smallest organisms for climate answers – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

With more than 100 scientists and crew from nearly 30 research institutions, EXPORTS is the first coordinated multidisciplinary science campaign of its kind to study the pathways, fates and carbon cycle impacts of microscopic and other plankton using two research vessels, a range of underwater robotic platforms and satellite imagery.

NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

With a new research plane and a new base to improve its chances of outsmarting Atlantic hurricanes, NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign takes to the sky this week for its third year of gathering data on how the ocean around Greenland is melting its glaciers.

The Coolest Bugatti Ever Goes 18 MPH (and Is Made of Lego)

The Coolest Bugatti Ever Goes 18 MPH (and Is Made of Lego)

Where the real Chiron produces 1,500 horsepower from a quad-turbocharged W16 engine and can hit 261 mph, the Lego lookalike makes 5.3 horses from 2,304 tiny motors, can go 18 mph—surely the slowest any vehicle has driven at Germany's Ehra Lessien proving ground.