Uber Sues NYC to Kill Its Ride-Hail Car Cap

Uber Sues NYC to Kill Its Ride-Hail Car Cap

In its lawsuit, filed in a New York state court Friday afternoon, Uber argues that the one-year freeze on ride-hail vehicle licenses is anticompetitive and exceeds the city’s authority.

New York and Amazon Played a Zero-Sum Game—And Everyone Lost

New York and Amazon Played a Zero-Sum Game—And Everyone Lost

Its decision to terminate its planned expansion in the Queens neighborhood of Long Island City will be bad for New York City, bad for Amazon, and not so great for a national economic system that will need all of the investment and innovation it can get in the years ahead.

Amazon Won't Build Its New Headquarters in New York City

Amazon Won't Build Its New Headquarters in New York City

Amazon Won't Build Its New Headquarters in New York City The company was expected to receive almost $3 billion in tax breaks and other government incentives in exchange for opening its new corporate office (as well as a helicopter pad for Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos).

Americans Are Abandoning Public Transit—but Don't Blame Uber

Americans Are Abandoning Public Transit—but Don't Blame Uber

And while Uber and Lyft have grabbed headlines for convincing people to abandon transit in big cities like New York and Chicago, the TransitCenter advocates argue that the effects of those services are limited to just a few dense, urban places.

NYC Now Knows More Than Ever About Your Uber and Lyft Trips

NYC Now Knows More Than Ever About Your Uber and Lyft Trips

If Uber, Lyft, Via, and Juno want to keep operating in the city, they’ll have to provide the TLC with even more finely detailed data than they do now: the date, time, and location of pickups and drop-offs (at least down to the intersection), the vehicle’s license number, the trip mileage, itemized trip fare, route (including whether the vehicle entered traffic-choked Midtown), and how much the driver was paid.

Māori carvers head to Antarctica

Māori carvers head to Antarctica

Poutama Hetaraka says he is not only looking forward to experiencing a completely different environment but also to seeing mātauranga Māori become more and more embedded in conversations about environmental management of the Earth and Antarctica in particular”.

Lyft Sues New York City Over Driver Minimum Wage Rules

Lyft Sues New York City Over Driver Minimum Wage Rules

(Via’s utilization rate is higher than Uber’s not because it has more drivers but because it offers only shared rides, much like Uber’s ride-pooling service, UberPOOL.) “Our lawsuit does not target the law passed by City Council but instead addresses the specific way the TLC plans to implement the rules, which would advantage Uber in New York City at the expense of drivers and smaller players such as Lyft,” Lyft spokesperson Campbell Matthews said in a statement.

Trump's Fast Food Photo Op Tops This Week's Internet News

Trump's Fast Food Photo Op Tops This Week's Internet News

Reports over the past week suggest strongly that perhaps Trump has the interests of an entirely different nation in mind when he makes decisions. What really happened: As if all the existing intrigue surrounding Trump wasn't enough to make people wonder about his loyalties, The New York Times dropped a bombshell report last weekend.

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Shapes a New Political Reality

Thus when a 29-year-old former bartender of Puerto Rican descent beats a senior Democratic leader of the House, and then proceeds to set the political agenda during her first week in office, it’s more than a cute social media story.

New York Has Averted a Subway Line Shutdown. Now What?

New York Has Averted a Subway Line Shutdown. Now What?

New York City's plans to dodge transit disaster during the L train shutdown included building more infrastructure for cyclists, bus riders, and walkers.

StreetCred Is Challenging Google Maps—and It Wants Your Help

StreetCred Is Challenging Google Maps—and It Wants Your Help

This Startup Is Challenging Google Maps—and It Needs YouStreetCred's MapNYC program is an effort to find out what might motivate map enthusiasts, crypto-lovers, maybe even people who hadn’t the faintest about either, to feed it data.Muiris Woulfe/Getty ImagesA whole lifetime in New York City, and Christiana Ting didn’t realize just how many urgent care facilities there were until the app told her to start looking for them.

Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help Public Discourse

Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help Public Discourse

In other words, our internet-and-smartphone-driven age does not represent, as we might think, its own huge shift from the Enlightenment tradition, but rather the most recent stages of a shift that started with disembodied voices and faces streaming out of clunky boxes.Two of the most accessible and relevant of this canon are similar in topic, though written nearly a generation apart: Daniel Boorstin’s The Image and Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death.

Embrace a Fake Meat Future for Its Lesser-Known Benefits

Embrace a Fake Meat Future for Its Lesser-Known Benefits

The company aims to release it in two years.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to Climate ChangeTo get to true mass adoption, fake meat will need to compete favorably with the real thing on multiple fronts.

Lyft Bets Big on Bikes in NYC, and Uber Is None Too Happy

Lyft Bets Big on Bikes in NYC, and Uber Is None Too Happy

But both Uber and Lime say they’ve been snubbed, and that they want to expand service to more lower income New Yorkers.A mock-up of Lyft's branded dockless bikes, which the company says it might deploy in cities all over the US.

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

This Week In the Future of Cars: Women Pay More for Transit

If the thought of holiday traffic next week is already getting you down, then we also have (futuristic) options for getting up and over it.HeadlinesStories you might have missed from WIRED this weekPublic transit is supposed to be equally accessible to anyone, but as Aarian Marshall reports, women pay a “pink transport tax.” In New York City, women pay $36 to $50 extra per month just to get around, mainly due to safety concerns.

Borrowing a Page From Uber, Tinder Invents the 'Swipe Surge'

Borrowing a Page From Uber, Tinder Invents the 'Swipe Surge'

The company also says that in some cities, like New York, surges may happen later at night than elsewhere.Just like a ride-hailing company, Tinder constantly needs to solve the problem of supply and demand.When users choose to participate in a Swipe Surge, their profiles are placed at the beginning of the line, meaning other users swiping at the same time will see them first.

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos Won

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos Won

Amazon’s HQ2 Hunger Games Are Over, and Jeff Bezos WonMark Lennihan/APAfter a 14-month search, Amazon announced Tuesday that it will open a pair of regional offices in two major metropolitan areas where it already has a presence: the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, a borough of New York, and Arlington, Virginia, just outside Washington DC.The decision comes after more than 230 cities submitted bids to be home of the Seattle-based company’s highly anticipated second headquarters, which originally promised to employ 50,000 white-collar workers.

The Pink Transit Tax: Women Spend More Than Men to Get Around NYC

The Pink Transit Tax: Women Spend More Than Men to Get Around NYC

“It got me thinking about the day-to-day issues that women face in major cities.”The survey suggests that those experiences on public transit led to many women to make a different set of transportation choices from those made by men.

Kim Stanley Robinson Writes Like the Past to Warn of the Future

Kim Stanley Robinson Writes Like the Past to Warn of the Future

Genre, as always, is a good tool for taking big ideas and making them fight.Robinson has been writing since the 1980s, but it was arguably Red Mars, the first book in a trilogy about the colonization and terraforming of you-know-where, for which he became best known.

Exxon Sued by NY for Deceiving Investors on Climate Change

Exxon Sued by NY for Deceiving Investors on Climate Change

(IW 500/1) stood before a New York judge in August and told the state’s attorney general to "put up or shut up" after investigating the company’s public disclosures about climate change, saying it should sue the company or move on.

Hurricane Florence Live Updates: Rescues in North Carolina as Storm Makes Landfall

Hurricane Florence Live Updates: Rescues in North Carolina as Storm Makes Landfall

In the riverfront city of New Bern, emergency rescue teams were trying to reach hundreds of residents trapped in cars, on roofs and in their attics as the Neuse River overflowed and flooded the city.Here are the latest developments:• The storm, which was downgraded to Category 1 late Thursday, made landfall about 7:15 a.m., with winds of about 90 miles an hour.

Hurricane Florence: Evacuating Cities Struggle to Help Those Who Can't Drive

Hurricane Florence: Evacuating Cities Struggle to Help Those Who Can't Drive

When It's Time to Evacuate, Cities Struggle to Help Those Who Can't DriveAs Hurricane Florence bears down on the mid-Atlantic coast, emergency managers are painfully aware that not everyone in the region can drive to safety—and they're working to help them out.Randall Hill/ReutersEvery hurricane season, news reports divide the country’s coast into two camps.

Typhoon Mangkhut Live Updates: Philippines Braces for the Worst

Typhoon Mangkhut Live Updates: Philippines Braces for the Worst

Thousands of people were being evacuated from their homes in the Philippines on Friday, as Super Typhoon Mangkhut, a colossal storm more than 550 miles wide with maximum sustained wind speeds of 173 miles per hour, howled its way across the Pacific.Mangkhut’s eye is on course to hit in the early hours Saturday on the northern island of Luzon, the country’s rice and corn growing heartland, where more than four million people are at risk.The storm, gusting at speeds equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane, passed the American territory of Guam on Thursday, knocking out 80 percent of the island’s electricity and downing trees and power lines.

Hurricane Florence’s Path: Closing In on Carolina Coast

Hurricane Florence’s Path: Closing In on Carolina Coast

Federal, state and local officials, who have already spent days trying to warn people in Florence’s path of the potential severity of the storm, issued some of their most strident pleas yet on Wednesday for people to get out of harm’s way.“We know a lot of our coastal residents have ridden out storms before,” said Gov. Roy Cooper of North Carolina during a Wednesday evening news conference.

As New York and London mayors, we call on all cities to divest from fossil fuels | Bill de Blasio and Sadiq Khan

As New York and London mayors, we call on all cities to divest from fossil fuels | Bill de Blasio and Sadiq Khan

And that, together, our cities – New York, London and many others around the world – can send a clear message to the fossil fuel industry: change your ways now and join us in tackling climate change.

This Week in the Future of Cars: What Happened at Tesla, Uber, and Chevy this week

This Week in the Future of Cars: What Happened at Tesla, Uber, and Chevy this week

Alex chats with Waymo veteran and Aurora CEO Chris Urmson on why the startup will be smarter about machine learning than its competition, and how close its tech is to being able to do everything a human can.One year into his role as CEO of Uber, Dara Khosrowshahi reflects—and introduces a new suite of safety features.One Montana startup is using Doppler lidar—the same tech that cops use to catch speeding drivers—to create colorful images that just might give cars a better (and safer) sense of what is gong on around them.As part of a string of electrifying announcement from major automakers, Mercedes-Benz unveils its first fully electric SUV.

Hundreds of thousands expected to join global climate marches this weekend

Hundreds of thousands expected to join global climate marches this weekend

Hundreds of thousand of people in more than 90 countries are expected to take part in demonstrations this weekend to protest about the failure of politicians to tackle the global environmental crisis.

Many Major Airports Are Near Sea Level. A Disaster in Japan Shows What Can Go Wrong.

Many Major Airports Are Near Sea Level. A Disaster in Japan Shows What Can Go Wrong.

Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter.As a powerful typhoon tore through Japan this week, travelers at Kansai International Airport looked out on a terrifying void: Where there should have seen the runway, they saw only the sea.

Climate change warning: Sea levels rising even FASTER as ice caps melt

Climate change warning: Sea levels rising even FASTER as ice caps melt

GETTYA two metre jump could see a host of major cities be partially submergedCo-author John Fasullo, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said: "This study highlights the important role that can be played by satellite records in validating climate model projections.”If the calculations are correct, it would mean that sea levels could rise by almost one metre by 2100, which would be devastating for island countries around the globe.

Is the ‘Heat Day’ the New Snow Day?

Is the ‘Heat Day’ the New Snow Day?

By the end of the century, there could be 33 of those very hot days annually in Cranford, according to a New York Times analysis, meaning that the number of “extreme heat days” during the school year could rise sharply.On Wednesday, three high school students at the Bergen Arts and Science Charter High School in Hackensack, N.J., were taken to the hospital to be treated for heat-related illness after running a mile in gym class as temperatures climbed above 90 degrees.“I’m very upset with the school,” said Joseph Dymarczyk, the father of a sophomore who was treated for exhaustion.

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