Electric Delivery Vans, Tesla Stock, and Other Car News

It’s 2020, and good news is that the money continues to flow. This week, we tracked the rise of two big money industries—both related, it turns out, to the rise in home delivery. Electric delivery vans just might be the best way to use EVs, and British newcomer Arrival announced this week that, a) it exists and b) it’s obtained some $111 million in funding, courtesy of Hyundai and Kia. And we took a look at cities and real estate developers trying to capitalize off the growth of speedy delivery by getting creative with urban distribution centers.
Plus,Tesla hits new stock price records , and physicists have some tips for your next flight . It’s been a week; let’s get you caught up.

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Headlines

Stories you might have missed from WIRED this week
  • A $189,000 Aston Martin SUV vs. the vast, unrelenting desert.
  • Tesla is really worth a lot of money now.

  • Why smaller urban distribution centers are the hot thing in real estate. (Hint: Amazon has something to do with it.)
  • With the announcement of a $111.5 million investment from Hyundai and Kia, this week marked the arrival of Arrival , another startup dedicated to building electric delivery vans.
  • Physicists say this is the fastest way to board a plane.

Political Endorsement of the Week

The hip kids still on Facebook (who are you?) will no doubt be familiar with 180,000-member group NUMTOT: New Urbanist Memes For Transit-Oriented Teens. The group specializes in meme-y, pro-transit, sometimes toxic conversations about urbanism, and this week its moderators did a crazy thing and endorsed a presidential candidate: Bernie Sanders. The moderators cited Sanders’ approach to transportation and housing policy, and to social and economic welfare. Are young city transportation nerds a real constituency? We’ll find out.

Stat of the Week: 20%

The share of California transportation emissions produced by trucks—even though they represent just 4 percent of the state’s vehicles. That’s according to the state’s Air Resources Board, which says the decentralized truck market, in which hundreds of thousands of companies and owner-operators own the vehicles in the state, makes their emissions especially hard to regulate.

Required Reading

News from elsewhere on the internet

In the RearviewEssential stories from WIRED’s canonRewind to last fall, when Amazon announced it had ordered 100,000 electric delivery vans from the US company Rivian.
  • Here's what directing a Star Wars movie is really like
  • The mad scientist who wrote the book on how to hunt hackers
  • How the US prepares its embassies for potential attacks
  • When the transportation revolution hit the real world
  • The psychedelic beauty of destroyed CDs
  • 👁 Will AI as a field "hit the wall" soon ? Plus, the latest news on artificial intelligence
  • ✨ Optimize your home life with our Gear team’s best picks, from robot vacuums to affordable mattresses to smart speakers