In Alaska, Summer's Getting Too Hot for the Salmon Run

In Alaska, Summer's Getting Too Hot for the Salmon Run

As Bristol Bay fishermen gear up for this year’s salmon season—one beset by fears that Covid-19 could overwhelm this remote region as thousands of seasonal workers from across the world descend on fishing communities with scant medical resources—they must also contend with a slower-moving hazard: the warming temperatures that threaten a $1.5 billion industry and the people it supports.

BP Exits Alaska After 60 Years in $5.6 Billion Hilcorp Sale

BP Exits Alaska After 60 Years in $5.6 Billion Hilcorp Sale

The deal includes BP’s operating stake in Prudhoe Bay, the largest-producing oilfield in U.S. history, as well as all its Alaskan pipelines, London-based BP said Tuesday in a statement.

Alaska Will Finally Get Its Own Fiber-Optic Line

Alaska Will Finally Get Its Own Fiber-Optic Line

By building its own fiber-optic connection, the company will ensure that it has enough bandwidth to meet its customers’ needs, and potentially spend less buying capacity from submarine cable-based providers.

By 2080, Tropical Diseases Could Be Headed to Alaska

By 2080, Tropical Diseases Could Be Headed to Alaska

Nearly a billion people could be newly at risk of tropical diseases like dengue fever and Zika as climate change shifts the range of mosquitoes , according to a new study.

Ending the Government Shutdown Won't Fix Flight Delays

Ending the Government Shutdown Won't Fix Flight Delays

“In 2013, when the government shut down for two weeks, it took the FAA nearly six months to get the school back up to a normal level of training capabilities,” says Sharon LaRue, a professor of air traffic control at the University of Alaska in Anchorage.

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

Looking at streams on Alaska’s Kodiak Island, the researchers found that the varied timing of salmon migrations likely matters as much as abundance. Previous research found that this variance in migration timing among streams matters a lot to brown bears and other wildlife that feed on salmon.

Why Seattle Built—Then Buried—a Key Part of Its New Tunnel

Why Seattle Built—Then Buried—a Key Part of Its New Tunnel

Why Seattle Built—Then Buried—a Key Part of Its New Tunnel Now that the 1.7-mile tunnel underneath Seattle is complete, crews can hook it up to the rest of the road system, and demolish the Alaskan Way Viaduct it's replacing.

Climate change triggered tsunami TWICE the size of Big Ben - 193m SUPER WAVE hit Alaska

Climate change triggered tsunami TWICE the size of Big Ben - 193m SUPER WAVE hit Alaska

CLIMATE change triggered a tsunami which was twice the size of Big Ben in 2015, and experts believe these mega waves will become more common in the future as the globe continues to warm.

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Modeling forests' future – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The megafires paper is one of two recently released studies based on data from NASA’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment, or ABoVE, that will help scientists better understand and predict both short- and long-term changes in the ecosystems of Alaska and Northern Canada.

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A new NASA-led study using data from the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) shows that carbon in Alaska's North Slope tundra ecosystems spends about 13 percent less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago.

Unexpected future boost of methane possible from Arctic permafrost – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Unexpected future boost of methane possible from Arctic permafrost – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

"The mechanism of abrupt thaw and thermokarst lake formation matters a lot for the permafrost-carbon feedback this century," said first author Katey Walter Anthony at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, who led the project that was part of NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), a ten-year program to understand climate change effects on the Arctic.