GMOs Could be a Key to Sustainable Farming

GMOs Could be a Key to Sustainable Farming

Illustration: Alvaro DominguezBut unfortunately, the packages on my counter and elsewhere in my kitchen, like my fancy organic sauerkraut (“Our passion for healthy, natural living is reflected in all our products”), told me very little that was relevant to climate change .

Australia's Bushfires Completely Blasted Through the Models

Australia's Bushfires Completely Blasted Through the Models

“This is perhaps one of the first really big cases where we've seen the real world do something before we've been able to have the capacity to model it properly,” says climate scientist Benjamin Sanderson of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, who cowrote a piece in the Nature Climate Change package.

FAO - News Article: Germany launches €20 million programme with FAO and UNDP to boost the agriculture sectors’ role in addressing climate change

FAO - News Article: Germany launches €20 million programme with FAO and UNDP to boost the agriculture sectors’ role in addressing climate change

11 December, Madrid - The German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety through its International Climate Initiative today announced it is providing €20 million for a new programme co-led by FAO and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), to accelerate climate change action in developing countries' agricultural and land use sectors.

FAO - News Article: A Great Green Wall for Cities

FAO - News Article: A Great Green Wall for Cities

21 September 2019, New York - The UN Food and Agriculture Organization's Director-General Qu Dongyu today announced the Great Green Wall for Cities initiative that aims to support nature-based solutions to climate change.

Can Migrating Birds Adapt To Climate Change?

Can Migrating Birds Adapt To Climate Change?

The project seeks to include characteristics like topography and soil type into conservation planning, as scientists expect that representing the full range of variation in these factors in protection plans, and ensuring that important sites are connected by natural land cover, will help landscapes and species adapt to climate change.

Harnessing creativity for change: The art of resilience

Harnessing creativity for change: The art of resilience

In an era of increasing natural hazards and climate change, art can also communicate the future risks we face. Last year, on the sidelines of FOSS4G and Understanding Risk Tanzania, a mural challenge brought together young Tanzanian artists to communicate visually about risk and resilience.

Building a more resilient caribbean to natural disasters and climate change

Building a more resilient caribbean to natural disasters and climate change

They could design disaster-resilience strategies with support from international financial institutions (IFIs), multilateral development banks, donors, and climate funds, increase efforts to restore fiscal sustainability to create room for resilience-building, while incorporating upfront costs and long-term benefits of resilience investments in macro-fiscal frameworks.

To Prevent Wildfires, Treat Utilities Like Railroad Barons

To Prevent Wildfires, Treat Utilities Like Railroad Barons

(PG&E declined to comment for this story, pointing instead to a press release that says it will “make investments in system safety as it works with regulators, policymakers and other key stakeholders to consider a range of alternatives to provide for the safe delivery of natural gas and electric service for the long-term in an environment that continues to be challenged by climate change.”) Utilities know full well how to manage their risk.

Overcoming a Climate Change Fallacy

Overcoming a Climate Change Fallacy

According to a recent study published in Nature Climate Change by Conservancy scientists and partners from Florida International University, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others, healthy wetlands (think wetlands covered with plants) are net sinks for greenhouse gases in the U.S. That means, on the whole, the country’s coastal wetlands remove more greenhouse gases – especially CO2 – than they release.

Want to solve the world’s problems? Try working together across disciplines

Want to solve the world’s problems? Try working together across disciplines

An article published in Science last year diagnosed the real problem of climate change in this way: “Experiencing the self as separate from nature is the foundation of humanity’s damaged relationship to planetary resources.” The only real solution to the climate problems facing our planet is to change mindsets, an approach that requires a complex understanding of all the ways that individuals and institutions interact with the natural world.

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

While barn owls and western meadowlarks were “losers” during the drought, killdeer and greater roadrunners were “winners.” The blunt-nosed leopard lizard suffered; the side-blotched lizard came up in the world.“The drought kind of knocked down the species that were dominating and allowed the underdogs to do better and stay in the system,” says wildlife ecologist Laura Prugh of the University of Washington, lead author on the new paper in Nature Climate Change.For all the winners and losers, nearly three quarters of species weren’t strongly affected by the drought.

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

Building on a large body of existing research, they divided natural carbon sinks into 20 different pathways and then calculated both their potential for emissions reductions and the associated costs.

Long-term Records Validate What We Know About Climate Change

Long-term Records Validate What We Know About Climate Change

Nature is validating what we know about climate change from long-term records of temperature. Earlier plant flowering in spring as a response to global warming in the Washington, D.C. area.

Call for Applications: NatureNet Science Fellows

Call for Applications: NatureNet Science Fellows

Now in its fifth year, the Conservancy’s NatureNet Science Fellows program is specifically designed to broaden conservation science and research in ways that tackle climate change — our world’s most pressing challenge — head on.