Spring Flowers Are Blooming Earlier in Greater Yellowstone

Spring Flowers Are Blooming Earlier in Greater Yellowstone

But climate change is knocking the timing of flowering and fruiting out of whack for many plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem according to a new study authored by scientists at The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Wyoming.

You Don’t Have to Quit Meat to Save the Planet—Just Eat Less

You Don’t Have to Quit Meat to Save the Planet—Just Eat Less

But if people swapped 20 percent of their beef for mycoprotein, deforestation rates by 2050 would be half what they would be if beef consumption continued to rise as projected.“Part of the solution to this problem could be existing biotechnology,” says Florian Humpenöder, a researcher at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany and the lead author of the Nature paper.

Saving the Pacific’s Most Endangered Leatherback Sea Turtles

Saving the Pacific’s Most Endangered Leatherback Sea Turtles

The rangers walking the beach tonight are part of a new monitoring effort, led by The Nature Conservancy, to gather information about the Western Pacific leatherbacks nesting in the Solomon Islands.

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

Studies from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) have found that more than 100 billion kilowatt-hours are wasted every year because of vampire energy, “costing American consumers over $19 billion—about $165 per US household on average—and 50 large (500-megawatt) power plants’ worth of electricity.”.

Protecting and Restoring the Floodplain Forest

Protecting and Restoring the Floodplain Forest

© Chuck Peoples / TNC In 1989, the Conservancy purchased 10,626 acres along the river that became the Roanoke National Wildlife Refuge.Since 2002, the Conservancy has worked with the Corps of Engineers on dam releases that mimic natural flows, providing pulses of water to the floodplain forest that provide for vegetation and fish migration and spawning.

Some (Kinda) Good Climate News: 2 Degrees Is Doable

Some (Kinda) Good Climate News: 2 Degrees Is Doable

That shift is clear in a darn near uplifting paper that publishes today in the journal Nature: Modeling by an international team of scientists shows that if nations uphold their recent climate pledges, including those made at COP26, humanity may keep warming under 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the goal outlined in the Paris Agreement.

The Field Herper: Finding Reptiles and Amphibians for Fun

The Field Herper: Finding Reptiles and Amphibians for Fun

“Whatever it is in the natural world that you get into, you get deeper and deeper into the lives of those animals,” says Mike Pingleton, field herper.© Daniel Núñez/TNC Photo Contest 2021 Pingleton, a field herper, retired from a 30-year career of computer operations in 2019.

Earth Month Book Review 2022

Earth Month Book Review 2022

In this book, he looks for what remains – the museum specimens and stories – of 11 creatures no longer on this planet.It’s illustrated with lovely prints by Jade They, making this feel like a natural history book of my youth.

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

In a rare opportunity to improve understanding of the nature and impact of a major volcanic eruption, NIWA scientists are sailing to Tonga to survey the ocean around the Hunga-Tonga Hunga-Ha'apai (HT–HH) volcano and surrounding regions.

Gender-Based Violence Is a Conservation Issue: How to Respond?

Gender-Based Violence Is a Conservation Issue: How to Respond?

However, thanks to efforts from International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and USAID’s AGENT collaboration and increased information sharing across our field, we have better access to research, tools, and resources to mitigate and respond GBV in our conservation programs.

Europe Is Scrambling to Turn Its Back on Russian Oil and Gas

Europe Is Scrambling to Turn Its Back on Russian Oil and Gas

While Baerbock said peace and freedom didn’t have a price tag, former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev was happier putting a number on the cost of shutting Nord Stream 2 down: “Welcome to the brave new world where Europeans are very soon going to pay €2,000 ($2,225) for 1,000 cubic meters of natural gas,” he tweeted.

'Rewilding' Asks: What Will You Do After the Climate Apocalypse?

'Rewilding' Asks: What Will You Do After the Climate Apocalypse?

Rewilding, with its focus on the degradation of the natural world and the possibility of restoring it, belongs to a long tradition of games that grapple with environmental issues.Other recent games with environmental themes indulge in naive fantasies about the control of nature, rewarding players for mastery over it.

What It’ll Take to Get Electric Planes off the Ground

What It’ll Take to Get Electric Planes off the Ground

Last week, along with other battery and aviation experts, Viswanathan published in Nature what he considers a “wake-up call” to the industry to invest in basic science beyond moving around lithium ions.

Old Climate Clues Shed New Light on History

Old Climate Clues Shed New Light on History

Relying on new geochemical techniques for analyzing ice core sediment to determine the dates of ancient volcanic activity down to the year or even season, the paper, published in Nature in 2015, showed that major eruptions worldwide caused precipitous, up-to-a-decade-long⁠ drops in global temperatures.

Natural History, Not Technology, Will Dictate Our Destiny

Natural History, Not Technology, Will Dictate Our Destiny

This story is adapted from A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us About the Destiny of the Human Species, by Rob Dunn.Knowing about these laws helps us understand the future into which we are—arms flailing, coal burning, and full speed ahead—hurling ourselves.

The Global Economy Ignores Developing Nations at Its Own Peril

The Global Economy Ignores Developing Nations at Its Own Peril

Given the integrated nature of the world economy, the fact that next year emerging economies will still not experience the economic rebound already seen in many developed regions in 2021 means global growth will remain low and slow.

How Hyenas Sanitize The City

How Hyenas Sanitize The City

“People use town during the day but at night, hyenas come from natural areas around town into the city to feed on carcass waste left out by people,” Sonawane says.

The great debate: when does summer begin?

The great debate: when does summer begin?

While both the astronomical and meteorological definitions are valid, NIWA forecasters have turned to Mother Nature’s weather patterns, looking at the warmest 90-day period of the year to provide another perspective on when summer in Aotearoa New Zealand begins.

A Gene-Tweaked Jellyfish Offers a Glimpse of Other Minds

A Gene-Tweaked Jellyfish Offers a Glimpse of Other Minds

GCaMP has been widely used in research on mice, zebrafish, and flies, but it actually originally comes from a jellyfish that’s closely related to Clytia, so Weissbourd’s team also had to knock out the genes for four other green fluorescent proteins that naturally occurred inside them.

When Wildfire Comes to Nature Conservancy Preserves

When Wildfire Comes to Nature Conservancy Preserves

© Blane Heumann/TNC Prescribed burning and other methods of fuel reduction are part of the management plans for many preserves, and these can in some cases help lessen the severity of ecological impacts.

Deforestation Is Killing Workers in Tropical Countries

Deforestation Is Killing Workers in Tropical Countries

“You can think of cutting down the forest as 100 years of global warming happening instantly,” says Nicholas Wolff , a climate scientist at The Nature Conservancy and lead author on the research.

The Cutest Way to Fight Climate Change? Send in the Otters

The Cutest Way to Fight Climate Change? Send in the Otters

But since the 18th century, California's kelp forest has been steadily mowed down by purple urchins, thanks to the massacre of their natural predator—the sea otter—hunted for its one-of-a-kind fur.Thanks in part to this first-of-its-kind program, the sea otter population along the California coast has swelled to 3,000.

How To See More Wildlife

How To See More Wildlife

More people are spending time in nature, and many would like to see cool wild animals.Learning the habitat needs of animals, at different times of year, is an essential but overlooked wildlife watching skill.

Opening windows and doors “one of the best ways” to remove Covid-19 from classroom air

Opening windows and doors “one of the best ways” to remove Covid-19 from classroom air

One of the best ways to reduce the likelihood of Covid-19 being transmitted in Aotearoa New Zealand classrooms is simply by opening doors and windows to create natural ventilation, say NIWA air quality experts.

Moose in the Morning: 20 Years of Silver Creek

Moose in the Morning: 20 Years of Silver Creek

It’s a mid-August morning, and I’m at The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve in southcentral Idaho, one of my favorite places.It’s trout and moose and mayflies and running water.

Four New Books for Fall

Four New Books for Fall

Pump is a natural history of the heart and the science is fascinating.Her book is a much-needed reminder that the plastics crisis isn’t an isolated problem that can be solved with reusable shopping bags or a natural body scrub.

A Third of Shark and Ray Species May Face Extinction

A Third of Shark and Ray Species May Face Extinction

The health of “entire ocean ecosystems” and food security is in jeopardy, said Dulvy, a former co-chair of the shark specialist group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).The number of species of sharks, rays, and chimaeras, known together as chondrichthyan fishes, facing “a global extinction crisis” has more than doubled in less than a decade, according to the paper published September 6 in the journal Current Biology.

Have You Seen A Weasel Lately?

Have You Seen A Weasel Lately?

“The authors of this paper are active field biologists, and we noticed that we just don’t see weasels in our data after field work,” says coauthor Roland Kays, research professor of forestry and environmental resources at North Carolina State and head of the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences’ Biodiversity Lab.

Fleeing Disaster Is Hard. Climate Change Is Making It Harder

Fleeing Disaster Is Hard. Climate Change Is Making It Harder

“More frequent, severe, and faster-growing wildfires and hurricanes increase the size and frequency of disasters and evacuations, and decrease the warning time,” says Keith Porter, a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center.

This Barnacle-Inspired Glue Seals Bleeding Organs in Seconds

This Barnacle-Inspired Glue Seals Bleeding Organs in Seconds

Yet it’s hard to create a seal on wet tissue, and most commercial products used to stop dangerous bleeding rely on coagulants which take minutes to work.In a study published this month in Nature Biomedical Engineering, his team demonstrated how this arthropod-like glue can stop bleeding in seconds.

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