How to Survive a Killer Asteroid

How to Survive a Killer Asteroid

Then, in the early 1900s, astronomers like Russia’s Nikolai Morozov* began observing newly developed high explosives and made a rather startling discovery: Large explosions differ from thrown rocks in a number of ways, but most ominously—at least for our species’ continued existence—they leave circular craters regardless of their angle of impact.

In Conservation, Sometimes It’s the Small Things that Inspire

In Conservation, Sometimes It’s the Small Things that Inspire

Photo © Nikolaj Lasbo / TNC These “passport stamps” are data points that help us understand that kestrel’s movements and migrations throughout its life — and HawkWatch staff and volunteers have now banded about 2,000 kestrels since 2013.