Covering Climate Now

Covering Climate Now

Expect to hear a lot more about climate change in the news next week – and a lot about NIWA’s work underpinning the science that is signalling a warmer world right now and its effects in the future.

Fiordland air samples revealing carbon secrets

Fiordland air samples revealing carbon secrets

As part of CarbonWatch NZ, NIWA atmospheric scientist Dr Peter Sperlich is sending specially designed glass flasks on fortnightly trips from Wellington to Fiordland to collect air samples that are then analysed in Wellington, Taiwan and the US.

NIWA UV research reinforces success of Montreal Protocol

NIWA UV research reinforces success of Montreal Protocol

On the eve of the 30th anniversary since the Montreal Protocol came into force, new research by NIWA scientists reinforces its reputation as the world’s most successful environmental treaty.

Winners of NIWA Wellington science fair

Winners of NIWA Wellington science fair

Top prizewinners: Blake Shepard, a Year 9 student from Rongotai College, won the $500 Royal Society of New Zealand Wellington Branch prize for the runner-up best overall exhibit with his project: “Is Cotton Rotten?”.

200 students compete to solve big science challenges at Auckland Science and Technology Fair

200 students compete to solve big science challenges at Auckland Science and Technology Fair

Everything from eating brownies made with bugs to a substitute for stickers on fruit has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Auckland Science and Technology Fair.

Students seek scientific solutions

Students seek scientific solutions

Everything from traffic safety to chickens and ballet shoes has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Wellington Science and Technology Fair.

Avocado Time Machine takes top prize at the NIWA BOP Science Fair

Avocado Time Machine takes top prize at the NIWA BOP Science Fair

Frustration with buying fruit and vegetables that are never ready to eat prompted a 13-year-old Tauranga girl to a design a machine to help.Bay of Plenty Science Fair 2019 winner Anamaya Taylor.

Student buzzing after winning Waikato science fair

Student buzzing after winning Waikato science fair

A 12-year-old has taken on the most damaging honey bee parasite in the world to win the NIWA Waikato Science and Technology Fair.He compared the use of oxalic acid via cardboard strips and vaporisation on several beehives to determine which method was the most effective.

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

Two reports released today by NIWA and the Deep South National Science Challenge reveal new information about how many New Zealanders, how many buildings and how much infrastructure could be affected by extreme river and coastal flooding from storms and sea-level rise.

New Zealand to have world-leading hazard risk modelling tool

New Zealand to have world-leading hazard risk modelling tool

EQC, GNS Science and NIWA have joined forces to further develop world-leading natural hazards risk modelling for New Zealand. Mr Morgan said the new partnership will broaden use of RiskScape to include more government, council and infrastructure company users, enabling more people to get a better understanding of the potential costs of natural hazards.

NIWA reveals Arrowtown air quality standards breached every time temperature plummets

NIWA reveals Arrowtown air quality standards breached every time temperature plummets

That’s more than double the national standard of 50, with hourly concentrations peaking at 314 micrograms per cubic metre,” says project leader NIWA air quality scientist Dr Ian Longley.

2019 so far - a story of weather and climate extremes

2019 so far - a story of weather and climate extremes

“During summer, heatwave conditions scorched our seas for the second consecutive year, while several areas of the country suffered ongoing drought conditions, including Nelson-Tasman where prolonged wildfires occurred and a state of emergency was declared,” says NIWA meteorologist Ben Noll.

It only gets brighter from tomorrow!

It only gets brighter from tomorrow!

NIWA staff plunge into Evans Bay for their mid-winter's swim on 20 June 2019. NIWA forecaster Ben Noll says in the Far North, the winter solstice has about 4 hours and 45 minutes less daylight than the summer solstice, but in Southland the difference is more than 7 hours.

Ambitious NIWA-led Antarctic Ocean project gets go-ahead

Ambitious NIWA-led Antarctic Ocean project gets go-ahead

Understanding how the Antarctic oceans work is vital to predicting the world’s future climate and the implications of climate change for humankind and the planet.

Come jump in a lake with NIWA

Come jump in a lake with NIWA

LakeSPI surveys have been carried out on 12 Rotorua Te Arawa lakes (Ōkāreka, Ōkaro, Ōkataina, Rerewhakaaitu, Rotoehu, Rotokākahi, Rotomā, Rotomāhana, Rotoiti, Rotorua, Tarawera, and Tikitapu) since 2005 and NIWA freshwater ecologist Tracey Burton says she has seen positive and negative changes.

Owha and her friends awarded citizenship

Owha and her friends awarded citizenship

It’s a huge step forward for the leopard seal according to NIWA cetacean biologist Dr Krista Hupman, who largely attributes this success to Owha who made the Waitemata Harbour her home in 2012. NIWA Cetacean Biologist/Ecologist Dr Krista Hupman has helped getting leopard seals a new residential status in New Zealand waters.

Thermal images reveal heat levels in New Zealand’s glaciers

Thermal images reveal heat levels in New Zealand’s glaciers

The surface temperature of debris on the glacier was 21.6ᵒC when the photo was taken, while the surface temperatures of the lake and surrounding rock ranged from 3.5ᵒC to 30.2ᵒC [Image: Andrew Lorrey, NIWA].

Scientists hoping to solve great eel mystery

Scientists hoping to solve great eel mystery

NIWA freshwater scientists are pinning their hopes of solving an age-old mystery on 10 female longfin eels who are about to begin an epic journey to their spawning grounds somewhere in the Pacific Ocean.

Scientists study how to predict marine heatwaves

Scientists study how to predict marine heatwaves

Periods of extremely warm sea surface temperatures persisted for a prolonged period of time and extended thousands of kilometres [Photo: Dave Allen, NIWA]. For the past two summers, the Tasman Sea has experienced a marine heatwave, where periods of extremely warm sea surface temperatures persisted for a prolonged period of time and extended thousands of kilometres.

Emirates Team New Zealand seek NIWA’s technical edge

Emirates Team New Zealand seek NIWA’s technical edge

“Weather is such a vital element of a successful America’s Cup campaign,” said Emirates Team New Zealand CEO Grant Dalton.

NIWA mapping Whakatipu lake floor

NIWA mapping Whakatipu lake floor

For the first time the Whakatipu lake floor will be mapped to build a picture of the potential for local tsunami hazards in the future.

Students, scientists, citizens study Arrowtown’s ailing air

Students, scientists, citizens study Arrowtown’s ailing air

Recent analysis by NIWA has shown that about 800,000 New Zealanders are exposed to fine particles in the air that exceed World Health Organisation guidelines every winter, the majority of which is due to home heating emissions.

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 1 May 2019

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 1 May 2019

Hotspots in the North Island are currently found in Aupouri Peninsula, interior Manawatu-Whanganui, and interior Hawke’s Bay. In the South Island, only subtle soil moisture changes were observed in the past week.

Environment report a clear picture of change: NIWA

Environment report a clear picture of change: NIWA

“The challenges of reducing our urban air pollutants and national greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to a highly variable and changing climate are hugely important and affect all New Zealanders.”.

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 17 April 2019

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 17 April 2019

A weekly update describing soil moisture across the country to help assess whether severely to extremely dry conditions are occurring or imminent. Due to the anticipated rainfall amounts over the next week, soil moisture levels will likely increase at least slightly across much of the North Island.

World Earth Day: Air quality and its effects on respiratory health

World Earth Day: Air quality and its effects on respiratory health

A newly formed partnership between Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ (ARFNZ) and NIWA aims to provide the latest air quality research to over 700,000 people living with respiratory conditions in New Zealand.

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 10 April 2019

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 10 April 2019

Conversely, the lower east coast and the far south (including Hawke’s Bay, coastal Wairarapa and Wellington) saw a soil moisture increase due to rainfall totals above average for the time of year.

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 4 April 2019

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 4 April 2019

However, hotspots remain in place across western Northland and Aupouri Peninsula, a small portion of central Waikato, southern Manawatu-Whanganui, and much of Wairarapa and southern Hawke’s Bay. In the South Island, soil moisture levels generally did not change significantly in the past week.

March temperatures more evidence of a warming climate

March temperatures more evidence of a warming climate

NIWA principal scientist climate Dr Brett Mullan says the high March temperatures were consistent with our warming climate and when seen in context with other warm months a clear trend was evident.

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 29 March 2019

NIWA's Hotspot Watch for 29 March 2019

The driest soils across the North Island compared to normal for this time of the year are found in eastern Northland, northern Waikato, interior Bay of Plenty, and Tararua District.

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