Demand grows for NIWA’s Riparian Management Training

Demand grows for NIWA’s Riparian Management Training

The first Targeted Riparian Management Course since 2015 was held for Hawke’s Bay Regional Council staff in Napier over two days in late February 2022.There were 12 Hawke’s Bay Regional Council staff on the course with a background in physical geography, looking to increase their knowledge around stream ecosystems.

In the snow: new tool to advise New Zealanders of snow conditions

In the snow: new tool to advise New Zealanders of snow conditions

NIWA’s Snow and Ice Network (SIN) provides information on snowfall, depth of snowpack, snow melt and climate for ten alpine sites across New Zealand, including Mueller Hut above Mount Cook Village.

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Ki uta ki tai: NIWA’s role in mountains-to-sea estuarine management

Researchers from Sustainable Seas and Our Land & Water National Science Challenges are involved in a two-year project called Ki uta ki tai: Estuaries, thresholds and values, which includes interwoven critical steps funded by MfE.

Snapped! Tag reveals fish’s 20-year history

Snapped! Tag reveals fish’s 20-year history

The snapper contained a tag – known as a passive integrated transponder (PIT) – that was implanted into the fish on 21 February 2002 by NIWA principal technician Derrick Parkinson, who incidentally still works at NIWA.

Why Was the Tonga Eruption So Massive? Scientists Have New Clues

Why Was the Tonga Eruption So Massive? Scientists Have New Clues

A team of scientists from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, or NIWA, recently observed something different.The slopes of the underwater volcano are still largely as they were before the eruption; the same features still contour the surrounding seafloor.

Tonga eruption discoveries defy expectations

Tonga eruption discoveries defy expectations

NIWA’s research vessel, RV Tangaroa , has returned from a month-long expedition as part of the Nippon Foundation-funded Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project (TESMaP), where scientists were studying the effects of January’s eruption of Hunga Tonga–Hunga Ha'apai (HT – HH).

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

Removing barriers to ensure freshwater fish can complete their life cycle

NIWA’s Freshwater Species Programme Leader Dr Paul Franklin said World Fish Migration Day, on May 21, is a good time to remind New Zealanders of the challenges migratory fish face, and also the research that is underway to provide solutions.

Guide explores the benefits of combating marine biofouling

Guide explores the benefits of combating marine biofouling

GloFouling Project Technical Analyst John Alonso, based in London, said the guide developed in partnership with NIWA will help each country deliver an economic analysis to understand the potential benefits of a policy to prevent or manage invasive aquatic species introduced by biofouling.

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

NIWA-Nippon Foundation Tonga Eruption Seabed Mapping Project a “rare opportunity” to study effects of Tonga eruption

In a rare opportunity to improve understanding of the nature and impact of a major volcanic eruption, NIWA scientists are sailing to Tonga to survey the ocean around the Hunga-Tonga Hunga-Ha'apai (HT–HH) volcano and surrounding regions.

Glaciers continue to shrink this year, says NIWA

Glaciers continue to shrink this year, says NIWA

Dr Lauren Vargo from Victoria University of Wellington says the retreat that we're seeing is due to the majority of New Zealand’s glaciers losing mass most years over the past decade.

New national rainfall record surpasses 56-year-old record

New national rainfall record surpasses 56-year-old record

NIWA meteorologists say the 103 mm of rain from 4am-5am recorded at Maungatapere near Whangārei on Monday 21 March is a new national hourly rainfall record for a low elevation station.

Mean heat: Marine heatwaves to get longer and hotter by 2100

Mean heat: Marine heatwaves to get longer and hotter by 2100

New research from the Deep South Challenge: Changing with our Climate and NIWA shows that New Zealand could experience very long and “very severe” marine heatwaves by the end of the century.

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

Tropical seafloor secrets revealed

NIWA scientists and Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have used satellite technology to chart the Cook Islands’ seafloor in never-before-seen detail.The work was done as part of Seabed 2030 - a collaborative project to produce a definitive map of the world ocean floor by 2030.

Cutting-edge AI sea craft helping scientists count fish

Cutting-edge AI sea craft helping scientists count fish

“Hoki are one of the species we research – they have major spawning events, but we are currently only able to collect data on these for a few weeks every two years.NIWA hopes to be routinely using the vessel for monitoring fish within the next five years.

Public asked to help build national flood photo database

Public asked to help build national flood photo database

NIWA is asking people in flood-affected areas to contribute photos to a national database to support understanding of flood hazard and flood risk.I am really excited by the development of NIWA’s citizen science app, as we look to gather more information to support our country’s flood management decision-making.”.

The positives of Wellington’s wet weather: marine pest control

The positives of Wellington’s wet weather: marine pest control

Marine scientists from NIWA have been on the hunt for high-risk invasive species as part of their latest biosecurity survey, designed to detect marine animals and plants that come in from overseas.

How we won the 36th America’s Cup

How we won the 36th America’s Cup

During the 2021 America’s Cup, NIWA’s supercomputer, the largest in New Zealand, was used to analyse past environmental conditions (hindcasting), predicting future weather (forecasting) and modelling ocean currents in the Hauraki Gulf – all to an extremely high resolution.

Surveying scallop populations with artificial intelligence

Surveying scallop populations with artificial intelligence

To ensure the fishing surveys have the least impact possible, NIWA has been working with the University of Canterbury and Fisheries New Zealand to develop a non-invasive method of counting scallop populations.

Snapper on the rise

Snapper on the rise

Thirty years of management informed by a raft of scientific research appears to now be paying dividends.In the Hauraki Gulf, commercial and recreational fishers are reporting improving catches, and NIWA scientists will soon be able to estimate whether the highly valued Hauraki Gulf snapper population is seeing a similar increase.

The great debate: when does summer begin?

The great debate: when does summer begin?

While both the astronomical and meteorological definitions are valid, NIWA forecasters have turned to Mother Nature’s weather patterns, looking at the warmest 90-day period of the year to provide another perspective on when summer in Aotearoa New Zealand begins.

NIWA celebrates its Science New Zealand Award winners for 2021

NIWA celebrates its Science New Zealand Award winners for 2021

Video of Science New Zealand Awards 2021 - Individual - Lifetime Award - Dr Malcolm Clark.Video of Science New Zealand Awards 2021 - Early Career Researcher Award - Alex Geddes.

Notification of COVID-19 vaccination status of NIWA workplaces

Notification of COVID-19 vaccination status of NIWA workplaces

As we all move to the NZ COVID-19 protection framework, and in accordance with our health and safety risk assessment and in consultation with our staff, NIWA is proposing to introduce a Vaccinated Workplace Policy from 15 December 2021.

Dramatic first weeks for Wellington’s newly hatched kororā

Dramatic first weeks for Wellington’s newly hatched kororā

Dr David Thompson, a seabird ecologist at NIWA, highlights the hurdles these little birds must go through to successfully raise young: “Breeding for kororā can be a stressful time because they need to find food for both themselves and their chicks, with one adult remaining at the nest while the other hunts.

Catch sampling

Catch sampling

In the noise of the Sanford processing shed In Auckland, NIWA scientists Rikki Taylor and Darren Parsons are measuring hundreds of fish from a catch that has just landed as well as removing otoliths to be measured back at the laboratory.

Opening windows and doors “one of the best ways” to remove Covid-19 from classroom air

Opening windows and doors “one of the best ways” to remove Covid-19 from classroom air

One of the best ways to reduce the likelihood of Covid-19 being transmitted in Aotearoa New Zealand classrooms is simply by opening doors and windows to create natural ventilation, say NIWA air quality experts.

Researchers produce stunning images

Researchers produce stunning images

Science takes NIWA employees to some stunning locations and leads to some special encounters, and every year the research organisation holds a photographic competition for staff working across its climate, oceans and freshwater platforms.

Coastal flooding likely to be main driver for adaptation

Coastal flooding likely to be main driver for adaptation

New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.“Rising seas are slowly causing a trifecta of impacts along coastlines in Aotearoa: increasingly frequent flooding, coastal erosion and even permanent inundation,” says Dr Scott Stephens, NIWA Chief Scientist for Coasts & Estuaries.

Retired scientist completes four-decade-long bibliographic work

Retired scientist completes four-decade-long bibliographic work

After 40 years of work, retired NIWA fisheries scientist Larry Paul has just published a 793-page bibliography of references to New Zealand marine fishes.For all that the bibliography covers, Larry says new species of fish are still being discovered throughout New Zealand’s waters.

It’s the warmest winter on record - again

It’s the warmest winter on record - again

NIWA meteorologist Nava Fedaeff also said there were 76 locations across the country that experienced a record or near-record warm winter.To put this winter’s record warmth in perspective, Ms Fedaeff delved into historic weather records and found that the last time New Zealand experienced a similar sequence of events was 50 years ago.

NIWA takes shot at golf course ratings

NIWA takes shot at golf course ratings

Dr Turner determined that using NIWA’s in-house, high resolution weather model, known as the NZCSM – New Zealand Convective Scale Model – could result in a fairer comparison across all golf courses.NZCSM mean wind speeds from the past four years were applied to the ratings calculation of almost 400 golf courses across the country.

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