How to Levitate Objects With Sound (and Break Your Mind)

How to Levitate Objects With Sound (and Break Your Mind)

But at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, physicist Chris Benmore and his colleagues are levitating objects with an unlikely tool: sound.Beyond the entertainment value, acoustic levitation is helping Benmore and his team do science: They're suspending pharmaceuticals and watching how molecules interact, by pointing the most intense X-ray source in the western hemisphere at the acoustic levitator.

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Photograph: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research InstitutePerhaps the most famous moon in the solar system (aside from our own) is Jupiter’s Europa.Photograph: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteIn 1989 after visiting the outer planets, Voyager 2 flew past Neptune and its large moon Triton.

The Style Maven Astrophysicists of Silicon Valley

The Style Maven Astrophysicists of Silicon Valley

And while machine learning now constitutes its own field of study, because scientists from fields like astrophysicists have been working with those kinds of models for years, they’re natural hires on data science teams.“We were already in Big Data before Big Data became a thing,” says Sudeep Das, an astrophysicist who now works at Netflix.

How One Lab Builds Very Film-Like Smartphone Photo Filters

How One Lab Builds Very Film-Like Smartphone Photo Filters

We're measuring how film responds to light and making a physical model of that," says Zach Hodges, whose real-ish title at VSCO is "image science-ish."

Why a Grape Turns Into a Fireball in a Microwave

Why a Grape Turns Into a Fireball in a Microwave

A common misconception is that the microwave acts on the grape from the outside in, like frozen meat defrosting, says physicist Pablo Bianucci of Concordia University, who worked on grape simulations included in a paper that appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

How an Anonymous 4chan Post Helped Solve a 25-Year-Old Math Puzzle

How an Anonymous 4chan Post Helped Solve a 25-Year-Old Math Puzzle

Fans were arguing online about the best order to watch the episodes, and the 4chan poster wondered: If viewers wanted to see the series in every possible order, what is the shortest list of episodes they’d have to watch?Quanta MagazineAboutOriginal story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.