Facebook Finally Cracks Down on QAnon

Facebook Finally Cracks Down on QAnon

Carnival disclosed this week that it was the latest victim, though the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing that the fallout should be limited.

From Ellen DeGeneres to Tom Hanks, QAnon Has Infiltrated the Hollywood Rumor Mill

From Ellen DeGeneres to Tom Hanks, QAnon Has Infiltrated the Hollywood Rumor Mill

Meanwhile, Ellen’s wife, Portia de Rossi, posted a text image on Instagram that said “I Stand With Ellen.” As a caption, she hashtagged: #StopBotAttacks.OK, a few major questions: Does Portia de Rossi believe that the criticism DeGeneres is facing is the result of disinformation-sowing automatons?

Twitter Cracks Down on QAnon. Your Move, Facebook

Twitter Cracks Down on QAnon. Your Move, Facebook

Twitter’s announcement, she said, suggests that the company has gotten more serious about the real-world consequences of activity on its platform.

The Co-Opting of French Unrest to Spread Disinformation

The Co-Opting of French Unrest to Spread Disinformation

“The goal is clear: show to the world that there is a civil war in France.” Other accounts identified by Robert as sharing similarly false or polarizing information claimed to be journalists and European [email protected], a relatively unknown account notable for its belief in the sprawling conspiracy theory known as QAnon, was another popular promoter of disinformation using #GiletsJaunes.

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like CultsMaddie McGarvey/Bloomberg/Getty ImagesIn recent months there’s been an increase in stories in which a follower of radical conspiracies shifts their actions from the web and into the world.In June, a QAnon conspiracy follower kicked off a one-man standoff at the Hoover Dam. Another QAnon supporter was arrested the next month occupying a Cemex cement factory, claiming that he had knowledge that Cemex was secretly assisting in child trafficking—a theory discussed in Facebook groups, in an attempt to push it into Twitter trending topics.Renee DiResta (@noUpside) is an Ideas contributor for WIRED, the director of research at New Knowledge, and a Mozilla fellow on media, misinformation, and trust.