A 1970s Essay Predicted Silicon Valley's High-Minded Tyranny

A 1970s Essay Predicted Silicon Valley's High-Minded Tyranny

Bitcoin is dominated by a small cadre of investors, and “mining” new coins is so expensive and electricity-draining that only large institutions can participate; Facebook’s advertising system is exploited by foreign governments and other malevolent political actors who have had free rein to spread disinformation and discord; and Google’s informal structure allows leaders to believe they can act in secret to dispense with credible accusations of harassment.In Freeman’s unstinting language, this rhetoric of openness “becomes a smokescreen for the strong or the lucky to establish unquestioned hegemony over others.”Because “Tyranny” explains how things work, as opposed to how people say things work, it has become a touchstone for social critics of all stripes.

Is California's Smoke Getting Worse? It's Complicated

Is California's Smoke Getting Worse? It's Complicated

"If you use intensity as a proxy for pollution—that is, if you assume stronger fires will produce more emissions like smoke—then by stint of that, yes, there ought to be more smoke," says atmospheric composition scientist Mark Parrington.A senior researcher at the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service, Parrington tracks wildfires around the world to better understand their effect on pollution and public health.