Crawling with Crickets: The Insect Swarm of the Western US

Crawling with Crickets: The Insect Swarm of the Western US

Mormon cricket outbreaks are more frequent than the 17-year cycle of the cicadas, and when they boom, the populations are impossible to miss.Certified Wildlife Biologist Jarren Kuipers of Land Steward Services notes that Mormon cricket outbreaks are more localized than the emergence of cicadas.

Recovery: A Plague of Bullfrogs

Recovery: A Plague of Bullfrogs

In the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area Hall and partners, including the Arizona Fish and Game Department, Bureau of Land Management, Cienega Watershed Partnership and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have built a robust Chiricahua leopard frog “metapopulation” — i.e., a group of populations separated by space.

The Strange Sex Life of Freshwater Mussels

The Strange Sex Life of Freshwater Mussels

Plain pocketbook mussel displaying lure, fish mimic with eye spot © Ryan Hagerty, US Fish & Wildlife Service To imagine the life of a freshwater mussel living in a southeastern U.S. river, picture a couch potato with a constant buffet line rolling past.

When Fish Eat Birds

When Fish Eat Birds

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports on one instance where two pike sampled in a river contained partially-digested bald eagle chicks. In one section of the River Tarn in southwestern France, a large catfish species not only actively seeks pigeons, but does so by attacking the birds on land.