The US Can Halve Its Emissions by 2030—if It Wants To

The US Can Halve Its Emissions by 2030—if It Wants To

Different teams have modeled how exactly this decarbonization might play out—by rolling out more solar and wind energy, for example, and more electric vehicles —and landed on several paths to cutting emissions in half in the next eight years.

Everyone Wants to Build Green Energy Projects. What's the Holdup?

Everyone Wants to Build Green Energy Projects. What's the Holdup?

The problem stems from a combination of factors: aging infrastructure, a discombobulated electrical grid that makes it difficult to get renewable energy from where it is produced to where it is needed, and the overwhelmed regulators responsible for approving the projects.

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

'Vampire Energy' Is Sucking the Life Out of Our Planet

Studies from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) have found that more than 100 billion kilowatt-hours are wasted every year because of vampire energy, “costing American consumers over $19 billion—about $165 per US household on average—and 50 large (500-megawatt) power plants’ worth of electricity.”.

The Energy Crisis Is Pushing Solar Adoption—for Those Who Can Pay

The Energy Crisis Is Pushing Solar Adoption—for Those Who Can Pay

“On that very first weekend when the price cap change came in, our inquiries increased by 300 percent,” says Richard Moule, a director at the Sheffield-based solar installers All Seasons Energy.

The Concrete Jungle Is Turning Green Again

The Concrete Jungle Is Turning Green Again

Their city eventually grew to more than twice Uruk’s population, and today Anuradhapura is one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities and still cares for a tree planted over 2,000 years ago.

Risks to Ukraine’s Nuclear Power Plants Are Small—but Not Zero

Risks to Ukraine’s Nuclear Power Plants Are Small—but Not Zero

“That’s certainly something I think the Russians would make an effort to avoid doing, not only because they don’t want to contaminate the country they’re trying to occupy—but, also, Ukraine needs electricity from those plants,” says Ed Lyman, senior global security scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists and coauthor of the book Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster.

Cities Are Unlikely Yet Powerful Weapons to Fight Climate Change

Cities Are Unlikely Yet Powerful Weapons to Fight Climate Change

Today, some three and a half billion people are highly vulnerable to the ravages of climate change—rising seas , heat waves , droughts , wildfires .“One of the most striking conclusions in our report is that we're seeing adverse impacts being much more widespread, and being much more negative than expected in prior reports,” said coauthor Camille Parmesan of the University of Plymouth and University of Texas at Austin, speaking at a Sunday press conference announcing the findings.

Why Cities Want Old Buildings Taken Down Gently

Why Cities Want Old Buildings Taken Down Gently

Christensen thinks of Good Wood, which also remills and sells the reclaimed lumber, as a kind of modern and sustainable forestry company, without the felling trees part.

Battery-Powered Trains Are Picking Up Speed

Battery-Powered Trains Are Picking Up Speed

Last fall, researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability predicted that retrofitting traditional diesel locomotives with battery power could save railroads $94 billion in fuel costs over 20 years, after buying the batteries, and would keep tons of pollutants out of the air.

Europe Is in the Middle of a Messy Nuclear Slowdown

Europe Is in the Middle of a Messy Nuclear Slowdown

Its neighbor Belgium currently sources nearly 40 percent of its electricity from nuclear power but has committed to closing down its seven remaining reactors by 2025.Critics of Europe’s nuclear shutdowns say losing reliable sources of low-carbon energy is the last thing we should be doing when we need to reduce emissions.

Natural History, Not Technology, Will Dictate Our Destiny

Natural History, Not Technology, Will Dictate Our Destiny

This story is adapted from A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us About the Destiny of the Human Species, by Rob Dunn.Knowing about these laws helps us understand the future into which we are—arms flailing, coal burning, and full speed ahead—hurling ourselves.

Gravity Could Solve Clean Energy’s One Major Drawback

Gravity Could Solve Clean Energy’s One Major Drawback

As each block descends, the motors that lift the blocks start spinning in reverse, generating electricity that courses through the thick cables running down the side of the crane and onto the power grid.

How Hyenas Sanitize The City

How Hyenas Sanitize The City

“People use town during the day but at night, hyenas come from natural areas around town into the city to feed on carcass waste left out by people,” Sonawane says.

A Clean Industrial Revolution Is the Only Way to Hit Net Zero

A Clean Industrial Revolution Is the Only Way to Hit Net Zero

Investors will accelerate the move away from technologies that contribute to climate change, building on a global trend that has seen private capital invest more and more in the energy transition, growing to $500 billion (£361 billion) in 2020.Investors will also increasingly reward companies that take courageous steps to fund technologies that we need to reach zero, but that haven’t been deployed yet—technologies like clean hydrogen, direct air capture, long-duration storage of electricity, and sustainable aviation fuels.

Hints of New Life in the Shadows of Venezuela's Last Glacier

Hints of New Life in the Shadows of Venezuela's Last Glacier

Today, only one glacier remains in Venezuela: on the second highest peak, Pico Humboldt.“It’s an era that is [almost] completely finished now,” says Melfo, a particle physicist at the University of the Andes, who has recently been working on projects involving biology and ecology, including research on this last glacier.

This Dam Simple Trick Is a Big Green Energy Win

This Dam Simple Trick Is a Big Green Energy Win

There is even more potential out there: A 2016 US Department of Energy report found that an additional 4.8 gigawatts of electricity could be generated by retrofitting non-powered dams over the next three decades.

A Water Crisis Reveals You Can't Recycle in the Arctic

A Water Crisis Reveals You Can't Recycle in the Arctic

“Most of the communities don't have the facilities to do proper plastic recycling,” says Susanna Fuller, vice president of operations and projects for Oceans North, an environmental organization that earlier this year published a groundbreaking report examining waste in Arctic Canada.

People Should Drink Way More Recycled Wastewater

People Should Drink Way More Recycled Wastewater

Here at the North City Water Reclamation Plant, very not-drinkable wastewater is turned into a liquid so pure it would actually wreak havoc on your body if you imbibed it without further treatment.

Why Do We Hate Trash Birds?

Why Do We Hate Trash Birds?

For an American whose template of “city” birds included pigeons and house sparrows, seeing an ibis strut beneath skyscrapers and menace city workers for a french fry is about as Australian as it gets.And it’s why endangered species captivate our attention, while the ubiquitous pigeon is a trash bird.

Deadly Heat Is Baking Cities. Here’s How to Cool Them Down

Deadly Heat Is Baking Cities. Here’s How to Cool Them Down

“So that means less clean air coming into the city, which would tend to make pollutant concentrations higher,” says Ban-Weiss, plus the loss of the breeze that itself keeps people cool.

An Outdated Grid Has Created a Solar Power Economic Divide

An Outdated Grid Has Created a Solar Power Economic Divide

Even if rooftop solar panels were free to everyone, the authors say, homeowners in these areas wouldn’t be able to use power from solar panels to run appliances or charge an electric vehicle without buying a special battery.

Why Flight Is So Controversial in Online Games

Why Flight Is So Controversial in Online Games

When game developers introduced mounted flying to online superhero game City of Heroes and World of Warcraft in the mid-aughts, it changed the MMORPG genre forever—both for better and for worse.

New York City Wasn’t Built for 21st Century Storms

New York City Wasn’t Built for 21st Century Storms

Wildfire thunderclouds in the West, blackouts in Texas , hurricanes in the South , torrential downpours in the East: “It's all the stuff we said would happen 20 years ago,” says Zeke Hausfather, a climate scientist and the director of climate and energy at the Breakthrough Institute.

Respawn’s Apex Legends Is Just Getting Started

Respawn’s Apex Legends Is Just Getting Started

The ping system and redeploy beacons have become, and still are, staples of the FPS genre that other developers (like Activision Blizzard, developers of Overwatch) are eager to bring to their own games, and while Respawn's new methods aren’t always practical from the start (see “heat shields”), they’re consistently rewiring the importance of team communication.

How to Get a Battery Replacement for Your Aging Smartphone

How to Get a Battery Replacement for Your Aging Smartphone

Like your car, they might just need a new part every now and then, and the best repair you can do on your phone to make it last longer is a battery replacement.

Groups Call for Ethical Guidelines on Location-Tracking Tech

Groups Call for Ethical Guidelines on Location-Tracking Tech

Chris Tucker, chairman of the American Geographical Society, a private research and advocacy group, says the Locus Charter aims to capture the potential benefits and risks of a world of invisible real-time tracking: from your weather app to the GPS system in your car, or at an international level, state-supported contact-tracing apps that keep tabs on people worldwide.

Indoor-Grown Weed Is Spewing Carbon Into the Atmosphere

Indoor-Grown Weed Is Spewing Carbon Into the Atmosphere

Based on their calculations, cannabis production results in over 2,000 kilograms of carbon dioxide emitted for every kilogram of product (defined as dried flowers), and its legalization has had a measurable effect on Colorado's greenhouse gas output.

A Hacker Tried to Poison a Florida City's Water Supply, Officials Say

A Hacker Tried to Poison a Florida City's Water Supply, Officials Say

Around 8 am on Friday morning, an employee of a water treatment plant in the 15,000-person city of Oldsmar, Florida, noticed that his mouse cursor was moving strangely on his computer screen, out of his control, as local police would later tell it.

How Did They Find the Secret Space Lab in Captain Marvel ?

How Did They Find the Secret Space Lab in Captain Marvel ?

You would need six coordinates to fully plot the state space for an orbiting object.So, it's pretty much impossible to know how the state vectors for an orbiting object will change over time.

How to Find a Better Cell Phone Carrier

How to Find a Better Cell Phone Carrier

Opensignal covers those bases if you tap Network Stats and swipe through its results for a given location, but you can also look at things like PCMag's yearly coverage of the fastest mobile networks for an idea of how speeds might vary from one city to another.