Climate change content for school kids gets revamp

Climate change content for school kids gets revamp

Young New Zealanders can now access the most up-to-date educational material about the science of climate change and its impacts on Aotearoa thanks to NIWA’s new web section: .

FAO - News Article: Green Climate Fund approves a $119 million climate resilient project for Cuba

FAO - News Article: Green Climate Fund approves a $119 million climate resilient project for Cuba

12 March 2020, Havana/Rome - The Board of the Green Climate Fund today approved a $119 million disbursement for a FAO co-designed project to boost the resilience to climate change of vulnerable rural communities in Cuba.

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Bringing Down Emissions, but Not for Long

The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Bringing Down Emissions, but Not for Long

“When the Chinese economy does recover, they are likely to see an increase in emissions in the short term to sort of make up for lost time, in terms of production,” says Zeke Hausfather, a climate scientist and the director of climate and energy at the Breakthrough Institute, which advocates for climate action.

More snow on glaciers but no good news, say scientists

More snow on glaciers but no good news, say scientists

The snowline survey began in 1977 and provides an incredibly valuable long-term record of how New Zealand’s glaciers have retreated over time due to climate change.

Greta Thunberg's Online Attackers Reveal a Grim Pattern

Greta Thunberg's Online Attackers Reveal a Grim Pattern

However, as the degrading sexualization of Thunberg and others demonstrates, the criticism and harassment women politicians and activists experience is different in kind than that experienced by their male counterparts.

We don’t know much about lakes and climate change, says researcher

We don’t know much about lakes and climate change, says researcher

Lake scientist Piet Verburg was part of an international team of 39 researchers from 20 countries who carried out a recent review of current knowledge on how lake ecosystems respond to extreme storm events.

Scientists to check out ash on New Zealand glaciers

Scientists to check out ash on New Zealand glaciers

Journalists are invited to attend a media conference in Queenstown on Friday, March 6, starting at 10.15am at which scientists from NIWA and Victoria University of Wellington will outline the initial findings of the annual end-of-summer snowline survey taking place on March 5.

Plane Contrails Have a Surprising Effect on Global Warming

Plane Contrails Have a Surprising Effect on Global Warming

Of the varied conspiracy theories regarding contrails—you know, chemtrails—one stands out for being especially wrong: the belief that the plane-made clouds are chemicals the government is secretly spraying to battle climate change , to the peril of those on the ground.

Australia's Bushfires Completely Blasted Through the Models

Australia's Bushfires Completely Blasted Through the Models

“This is perhaps one of the first really big cases where we've seen the real world do something before we've been able to have the capacity to model it properly,” says climate scientist Benjamin Sanderson of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, who cowrote a piece in the Nature Climate Change package.

Cities Fighting Climate Woes Hasten 'Green Gentrification'

Cities Fighting Climate Woes Hasten 'Green Gentrification'

“Or it becomes so important from an economic standpoint, so desirable and hardened with infrastructure that entire buildings are empty—purchased by real estate funds or individuals from the Middle East or Russia,” Anguelovski says.

Bezos' $10B Climate Fund, Bluetooth Bugs, and More News

Bezos' $10B Climate Fund, Bluetooth Bugs, and More News

Researchers from Singapore University of Technology and Design discovered 12 new Bluetooth bugs that potentially expose more than 480 devices, from fitness trackers and smart locks to medical tools and implants.You can sign up right here to make sure you get the news delivered fresh to your inbox every weekday!

Jeff Bezos Can Control Earth’s Future With His $10 Billion Pledge

Jeff Bezos Can Control Earth’s Future With His $10 Billion Pledge

In an Monday, the world’s richest man committed $10 billion of his personal fortune to set up the new Bezos Earth Fund, which would support “scientists, activists, NGOs—any effort that offers a real possibility to help preserve and protect the natural world.” The announcement was light on specifics, and it’s not clear yet how the money will be spent .

Bezos’ Earth Fund Should Invest in These Green Technologies

Bezos’ Earth Fund Should Invest in These Green Technologies

Yet if you were to construct a giant solar farm in space and beam that energy to Earth, the power of the sun would be available around the clock.If Bezos spent just 1 percent of the Earth Fund to develop space-based solar power, it would effectively double the available funding in the US.

The Arctic Is Getting Greener. That's Bad News for All of Us

The Arctic Is Getting Greener. That's Bad News for All of Us

Lightning—a phenomenon more suited to places like Florida—is now striking within 100 miles of the North Pole .All the while, researchers are racing to quantify how the plant species of the Arctic are coping with a much, much warmer world.

The Atlantic Ocean's 'Conveyor Belt' Stirs Up a Science Fight

The Atlantic Ocean's 'Conveyor Belt' Stirs Up a Science Fight

For decades, scientists have turned to the Labrador Sea to understand how ocean processes there may be affecting the strength of a massive oceanic conveyor belt known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

The Hottest New Literary Genre Is ‘Doomer Lit’

The Hottest New Literary Genre Is ‘Doomer Lit’

The genre, which imagines stories and worlds shaped by climate change, is sometimes considered a cousin of science fiction.R. Burgmann, he calls pessimistic fatalism one of the major “paradigmatic responses to climate change in recent fiction.”.

Want to Fight Climate Change? Stop Believing These Myths

Want to Fight Climate Change? Stop Believing These Myths

In response to the argument that we can ditch oil and coal immediately, he points out that renewable technologies are still more expensive and are not as readily available in the economically developing world, where plentiful and cheap fossil fuels are helping pull people out of poverty.

Permafrost Is Thawing So Fast, It’s Gouging Holes in the Arctic

Permafrost Is Thawing So Fast, It’s Gouging Holes in the Arctic

“Where permafrost tends to be lake sediment or organic soils, the type of Earth material that can hold a lot of water, these are like sponges on the landscape,” says Turetsky.

Climate Change Is Netflix's Ragnarok

Climate Change Is Netflix's Ragnarok

Netflix’s newest superhero coming-of-age drama, Ragnarok, de-Marvelizes the viking myths for our climate-crisis age of Scandinavian child heroes.It follows Magne, an awkward Norweigan teen who moves to a town called Edda with his mother and brother.

FAO - News Article: First comprehensive portal to track international capacity development support for forest monitoring

FAO - News Article: First comprehensive portal to track international capacity development support for forest monitoring

27 January 2020, Rome - The Global Forest Observations Initiative (GFOI) today launched a portal - the first such comprehensive platform - to track international capacity development support to developing countries in forest monitoring for climate action.

Weathering With You Is an Environmental Power Fantasy

Weathering With You Is an Environmental Power Fantasy

The movie cuts to Hina falling through the sky like some celestial thing, witnessing supernatural weather patterns only she’s meant to see.The added water vapor caused by global warming, climate scientists have warned for decades, will coalesce as heavy rain not unlike the constant downpour in Weathering.

Oh Sure, Big Tech Wants Regulation—on Its Own Terms

Oh Sure, Big Tech Wants Regulation—on Its Own Terms

But this perfectly captures the US tech industry’s shift toward talking regulation—just in a way that benefits itself—and the related risks of allowing private corporations to set the American (or even global) agenda on technology governance.Zeroing in on the singular technology thus pivots regulation dialogue in the corporate favor, away from talk of more fundamental, government-driven change.

The Doomsday Clock Moves Closer Than Ever to Midnight

The Doomsday Clock Moves Closer Than Ever to Midnight

These weapons "will severely limit response times available to targeted nations and create a dangerous degree of ambiguity and uncertainty, at least in part because of their likely ability to carry either nuclear or conventional warheads," the board members noted.

Australia’s Wildfires Might Intensify Future Climate Crises

Australia’s Wildfires Might Intensify Future Climate Crises

The ongoing Australian fire season has released more than 350 million metric tons of CO2 so far, with fires expected to keep burning over the next two months.

Here's What the World Will Look Like in 2030 ... Right?

Here's What the World Will Look Like in 2030 ... Right?

When the last person left the moon in 1972, few could have predicted that humans wouldn’t return for another 50 years.The agency is planning a crewed mission to the moon in 2024 , and this time it wants to stick around.

Cities Race to Slow Climate Change—and Improve Life for All

Cities Race to Slow Climate Change—and Improve Life for All

These mayors are members of C40, a network of 94 large cities—Paris, Los Angeles, Shanghai, Lagos, to name a few—committed to meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius over preindustrial levels and reducing global greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by 2030.That declaration didn’t just reaffirm these cities’ efforts to fight climate change .

It's Not Just You—Wild Swings in Extreme Weather Are Rising

It's Not Just You—Wild Swings in Extreme Weather Are Rising

All that rain meant a bumper crop of grasses and other vegetation, which, as hot and dry conditions returned, likely contributed to a combustible mix of fuels that played a role in the severe fires that have swept California in the past two years .These wild swings from one weather extreme to another are symptomatic of a phenomenon, variously known as “climate whiplash” or “weather whiplash,” that scientists say is likely to increase as the world warms.

What's in the Forecast: Private Weather Predictions

What's in the Forecast: Private Weather Predictions

After several years of testing, NOAA is now preparing to purchase readings from commercial satellites that use GPS signals to measure the density of the atmosphere.

We Might Not Be Planting the Right Kinds of Forests

We Might Not Be Planting the Right Kinds of Forests

“Although these can support local economies, plantations are much poorer at storing carbon than are natural forests, which develop with little or no disturbance from humans,” they wrote.

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

Another private forensics lab, in Texas, began building its own crowdsourced database exclusively for police searches this year.But when the child rapist Jeffrey Epstein died, and more of his nominally philanthropic donations became public, science faced a reckoning.