Recovery: A Plague of Bullfrogs

Recovery: A Plague of Bullfrogs

In the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area Hall and partners, including the Arizona Fish and Game Department, Bureau of Land Management, Cienega Watershed Partnership and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have built a robust Chiricahua leopard frog “metapopulation” — i.e., a group of populations separated by space.

Sustainable Swordfish: Fishing Deep for Conservation Solutions

Sustainable Swordfish: Fishing Deep for Conservation Solutions

“The Nature Conservancy needed a conservation solution that could tackle bycatch challenges while still providing economic opportunities for sustainable fishing in coastal fishing communities,” said Dr. Alexis Jackson, Fishery Project Director with TNC’s California Oceans Program.

Floodplains: Protecting & Restoring an Overlooked Ecosystem

Floodplains: Protecting & Restoring an Overlooked Ecosystem

A new tool developed by The Nature Conservancy provides answers, using a research-based approach to help agencies, communities and other stakeholders obtain the information they need to prioritize floodplain protection and restoration.

Recovery: Saving Mark Twain’s Famous Frog

Recovery: Saving Mark Twain’s Famous Frog

Likely causes include an alien amphibian disease called chytrid fungus, development, urban runoff, water loss from diversions, drought and fire from climate change, past predation by humans and current predation by non-native fauna.

Bird Country: Saving the Riverina’s Last Wild Wetlands

Bird Country: Saving the Riverina’s Last Wild Wetlands

This swamp and the adjoining lands contain some of the last large wetlands in drought-prone New South Wales, making it a critical lifeline for water birds, like straw-necked ibis, yellow-billed spoonbill, and Australian pelicans.

Remote Sensing Data Advances Soil Health Science

Remote Sensing Data Advances Soil Health Science

The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), developed by scientists and engineers at Dagan, uses publicly-available, remote sensing data from Landsat and Sentinel 2 satellites to monitor trends in the adoption rate of soil health practices—no-till, conservation tillage and cover crops—each year.

Recovery: The Seal and Shark Invasion

Recovery: The Seal and Shark Invasion

Photo © Atlantic White Shark Conservancy Fish and wildlife recovery can be unpopular, especially when it inconveniences the public.Great white shark predation on seal off Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge at the elbow of Cape Cod. Photo © Atlantic White Shark Conservancy Is the recolonization of gray seals helping with white shark recovery?

Exploring and Protecting the Arkansas Bayou

Exploring and Protecting the Arkansas Bayou

In 2009, Bayou DeView became the focus of the conservation and birding communities when the supposedly extinct ivory-billed woodpecker was purportedly spotted there.“Flatwater paddling through the delta is another unique reason we support this place,” says Porter, “We built the camping platforms a new way.

The Living Benefits of East Coast Dam Removal

The Living Benefits of East Coast Dam Removal

In fact, one of the leading reasons for removing obsolete dams is to improve community safety and the cultural benefits that come with restoring a river.Identifying and prioritizing removal of obsolete dams offers many benefits, including improving water quality and wildlife habitat, enhancing recreational opportunities, recharging aquifers and improving human safety.

Think Drones are Bad for Wildlife? These Videos May Change Your Mind

Think Drones are Bad for Wildlife? These Videos May Change Your Mind

Lozada, technology manager for The Nature Conservancy in Colorado , knows that many people that increasing drone use will only harass and terrify wild animals.Gustavo Lozada “Many people just want exciting video footage, and don’t think about how it may be affecting animals,” he says.

Restoring Emiquon’s “Wetland of Dreams”

Restoring Emiquon’s “Wetland of Dreams”

I’m in an airboat gliding across the glassy surface of The Nature Conservancy’s Emiquon Preserve , a restored floodplain wetland located along the Illinois River.

Recovery: Restoring the Floodplain Forest

Recovery: Restoring the Floodplain Forest

An American Elm. Photo © Diane Cook and Len Jenshel / TNC A hot August sun punched through rain clouds as my wife Donna and I exited our truck at the Fannie Stebbins Wildlife Refuge, in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, now part of the Silvio O.

Camera Trap Chronicles: The Pennsylvania Wilds

Camera Trap Chronicles: The Pennsylvania Wilds

Photo © TNC As a Nature Conservancy forester in Pennsylvania , Mike Eckley spends a lot of time assessing the health of woodlands.Beginning in 2008, Eckley set out trail cameras to monitor white-tailed deer, including their health and buck to doe ratios.

This Upland Sandpiper Was Banded 13 Years Ago. And It’s Still Alive.

This Upland Sandpiper Was Banded 13 Years Ago. And It’s Still Alive.

Photo © Greg Kramos Thirteen years ago, researchers banded an upland sandpiper on the Konza Prairie Biological Station , a field research station in the Flint Hills of Kansas .

50 Fish, 50 States: The Bass of Emiquon

50 Fish, 50 States: The Bass of Emiquon

Miller / TNC As white bass fishing on Emiquon goes, this is a slow day.I know bass fishing is just a small part of Emiquon Preserve.

Camera Trap Chronicles: Phantom Canyon Preserve

Camera Trap Chronicles: Phantom Canyon Preserve

Photo © Kevin Grunewald/TNC Camera traps reveal mountain lions walking down popular trails and on the canyon rim.Photo © Kevin Grunewald/TNC Bears are quite curious about camera traps, though, and can be very hard on them.

A Biodiversity Analysis in Los Angeles

A Biodiversity Analysis in Los Angeles

Understanding basic patterns in the biogeography of an urban area is the focus of a partnership between The Nature Conservancy and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Pacific Women Demand a Voice in Mining Decisions

Pacific Women Demand a Voice in Mining Decisions

Hausheer / TNC For women in the Solomon Islands, like Alice Hou, decisions about how to use natural resources can change lives — for better or worse.

Putting Nature on the Map (Literally)

Putting Nature on the Map (Literally)

Clearly, planners’ toolboxes need expanding so decisions normally made solely on the basis of housing, jobs, and transportation might now be informed by a more complete picture of the impacts of different patterns of growth on communities as a whole, including their more natural areas.

Seaweed as Sustainable Livelihood

Seaweed as Sustainable Livelihood

Photo © Kevin Arnold / TNC Our three-part Indonesia Guide: Coastal Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods through Seaweed Aquaculture in Indonesia provides information and recommendations for how seaweed buyers can increase the sustainability of their supply chains, conservation organizations can work within seaweed aquaculture for environmental and social gains, and farmers can improve their environmental and production practices.

Conservation Writing Awards for Cool Green Science

Conservation Writing Awards for Cool Green Science

This year, Cool Green Science stories by staff writers Justine Hausheer and Matt Miller won seven EIC awards, matching last year’s total . Hausheer deserves special recognition; her five awards this year — including two first places — plus four last year make her the most recognized blog writer in the organization.

Mapping Conservation & History on the Kokoda Track

Mapping Conservation & History on the Kokoda Track

Eighty years later, a Nature Conservancy scientist is creating a 3-D map of the Kokoda Track to help both preserve the site’s military history and protect the surrounding forest’s biodiversity and watershed services.

50 Fish, 50 States: A Conservation Journey

50 Fish, 50 States: A Conservation Journey

Largescale sucker © Ben Cantrell I’m on a quest to catch a fish in each of the 50 U.S. states – and to use each adventure as a way to explore conservation, the latest fisheries research and our complicated connections to the natural world. Miller / TNC Pyramid Lake once teemed with monstrous fish, a subspecies known as the Lahontan cutthroat trout.

Humans Made This Planet Hell. Hopefully We Can Help Some Species Adapt

Humans Made This Planet Hell. Hopefully We Can Help Some Species Adapt

Theoretically, this genetic diversity would make the bats more resilient to climate change, because a population that’s more adapted to arid conditions can interbreed with a population that’s less so, in essence “gifting” the cold-adapted population the genes necessary to survive a warmer world.

Can Migrating Birds Adapt To Climate Change?

Can Migrating Birds Adapt To Climate Change?

The project seeks to include characteristics like topography and soil type into conservation planning, as scientists expect that representing the full range of variation in these factors in protection plans, and ensuring that important sites are connected by natural land cover, will help landscapes and species adapt to climate change.

The Secret Sauce of Environmental Problem Solving

The Secret Sauce of Environmental Problem Solving

Through efforts like the Bridge Collaborative and SNAPP, willing collaborators have critical venues to find one another and cook that magic sauce we need for environmental problem solving.

Instagram's Newest Star Is ... a Tree?

Instagram's Newest Star Is ... a Tree?

“You don't need to plant anything, you just stop whacking the system,” says Bronson Griscom, director of forest carbon science at the Nature Conservancy.

Earth Optimism: Reasons to Feel Positive in 2019

Earth Optimism: Reasons to Feel Positive in 2019

Join CGS reporter Cara Byington as she learns how these conservation dogs help scientists monitor and protect these rare reptiles in their native prairie habitat.

Expanding Protected Areas Is Not Always the Best Investment

Expanding Protected Areas Is Not Always the Best Investment

A new paper shows that managing existing protected areas to a better standard is often a smarter investment of new funds than purchasing additional land. Given limited funding for conservation, countries are often faced with a choice: spend money on creating new protected areas, or allocating that money to better manage existing protected areas.

Recovery: Darters and Values

Recovery: Darters and Values

In 1973, 18 weeks before President Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act (ESA), University of Tennessee ichthyologist Dr. David Etnier discovered a new darter in the Little Tennessee River, site of TVA’s Tellico Dam, already under construction.