Linking Birds, Farmer Attitudes and Conservation

Linking Birds, Farmer Attitudes and Conservation

“Ornithologists and conservationists assume birds provide ecological services, and that farmers want them on their farms,” says Olivia Smith, lead author of the paper.

50 Fish, 50 States: Whitefish & the End of the World as We Know It

50 Fish, 50 States: Whitefish & the End of the World as We Know It

© Jacob Karst I’m on a quest to catch a fish in each of the 50 U.S. states – and to use each adventure as a means to explore conservation, the latest fisheries research and our complicated connections to the natural world.

Challenging Conservation Not to Leave Women Behind

Challenging Conservation Not to Leave Women Behind

There is a persistent perception that men should be the decision-makers and leaders in most contexts, both within conservation/natural resource management organizations and in the communities where they work.

Seabirds spend nearly 40% of their time on high seas, study finds

Seabirds spend nearly 40% of their time on high seas, study finds

NIWA seabird ecologist Dr David Thompson says while seabird tracking research has not been carried out for all albatrosses and large petrels in New Zealand, we know that several species also spend time in Chile and Peru, in Japan and the USA in the north Pacific Ocean, while others visit Namibia and South Africa.

Four Steps for the Earth: Mainstreaming the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework

Four Steps for the Earth: Mainstreaming the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework

Restoring nature while meeting human needs requires a bold vision, including mainstreaming biodiversity conservation in society.New research presents a Mitigation Hierarchy for mitigating and compensating the biodiversity impacts of developments (1, avoid; 2, minimize; 3, restore; and 4, offset, toward a target such as “no net loss” of biodiversity) within a broader framing encompassing all conservation actions.

Giving Wildlife Room to Roam in the Face of Climate Change

Giving Wildlife Room to Roam in the Face of Climate Change

A decade-long effort by 150 scientists has mapped microhabitats like this across the United States, using such data to identify the most resilient landscapes in the face of climate change.

Helping Birds Adapt to Climate Change in the Nevada Desert

Helping Birds Adapt to Climate Change in the Nevada Desert

AmeriCorp stewardship assistant Brittney Cade (front) leads a team of volunteers in planting trees along the Amargosa River.Planting 100,000 trees – and helping birds adapt to climate change – is just the latest chapter in the rich conservation history of the Amargosa.

Can Freshwater Reserves Protect Tropical Fish Diversity?

Can Freshwater Reserves Protect Tropical Fish Diversity?

A recent article published in the journal Nature shows the potential for freshwater reserves by looking at a network of grassroots protected areas established in the Salween River basin of Thailand.

Can This Group Revive the Finicky Corpse Flower?

Can This Group Revive the Finicky Corpse Flower?

To combat the lack of genetic diversity in the corpse flower and six other species with shallow gene pools, the Chicago Botanic Garden spearheaded the Tools and Resources for Endangered and Exceptional Plant Species (TREES) program in 2019.

Remembering Dr. Robert Jenkins, The Nature Conservancy’s First Science Director

Remembering Dr. Robert Jenkins, The Nature Conservancy’s First Science Director

Our History A New Kind of Conservation Jenkins developed and continually refined a data driven approach to prioritize and protect the rarest locations of plants and animals and the best examples of natural communities.

Slow Birding: Twenty Years Observing Ring Ouzels

Slow Birding: Twenty Years Observing Ring Ouzels

“I wanted to learn a lot more about a bird species and study it and get to know it,” he says.The Ring Ouzel helps paint that picture, a study of a bird species in a specific place.

Operation Ponderosa: Saving a Forest, Pandemic Edition

Operation Ponderosa: Saving a Forest, Pandemic Edition

Poloskey, an education and outreach coordinator for The Nature Conservancy in Texas , spent the summer collecting about 2,260 pine needles in the rugged yet fragile Davis Mountains of West Texas, fieldwork to help gain a better understanding of the genetics of ponderosa pines.

Mapping the Way to Better Conservation in the Caribbean

Mapping the Way to Better Conservation in the Caribbean

© Steve Schill for As TNC’s lead scientist in the Caribbean, Dr. Steve Schill often works from a boat, collecting underwater data that are used to document the condition of coral reefs and other marine habitats.

A Bolivian 'Cloud Forest' Reveals a Bonanza of New Species

A Bolivian 'Cloud Forest' Reveals a Bonanza of New Species

But a high-altitude Bolivian cloud forest has staked its claim as a global biodiversity hotspot as biologists announced today that they discovered an amazing 20 species new to science, including a poisonous viper, a super tiny frog, and four species each of orchids and butterflies.

The Cool Green Holiday Book Review 2020

The Cool Green Holiday Book Review 2020

This book tells stories of restoration at all scales, “from a small plot between sidewalk and curb to areas large enough to be labeled on a world map.” She spends time with people who, faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges, look to nature for solutions.

50 Fish, 50 States: Yellowstone’s Native Fish

50 Fish, 50 States: Yellowstone’s Native Fish

We essentially recognized that stocking westslope cutthroat and grayling in the Upper Gibbon was assisting their adaptation to climate change, and ensuring a future for native fish in the park for generations to come.”.

Conserving India’s Overlooked Freshwater Ecosystems

Conserving India’s Overlooked Freshwater Ecosystems

India boasts of a rich and vast freshwater resource network (rivers, lakes, wetlands, and groundwater), which occupies about 4 percent of the country’s area and supports its 1 billion people (17 percent of the world’s population).

Cool Green Fall Book Review

Cool Green Fall Book Review

And Burke spends time understanding what motivates guides and their clients to destroy family ties and friendships in pursuit of fish.It’s a story in the tradition of Ahab and Santiago, and one of the more enjoyable fishing books I’ve read this year.

Subterranean sensing

Subterranean sensing

Environmental monitoring technician Carl Fischer says there’s a fine balance between letting people in to enjoy the caves and protecting the caves from damage.Speleothems are created as water percolates into the cave.If CO2 is below about 2400ppm, percolation water will precipitate calcite and create speleothems.

The Case for Reviving the Civilian Conservation Corps

The Case for Reviving the Civilian Conservation Corps

In 1933, with the country deep in the Great Depression, the United States government created the Civilian Conservation Corps, a work program that gave young men jobs transforming the American landscape.

From Palmyra to the Pacific: Realigning a Rainforest

From Palmyra to the Pacific: Realigning a Rainforest

To that end, TNC is working with partners, including the USFWS, to derive lessons and best practices to maximize Palmyra’s resilience in the face of climate change by eradicating black rats, realigning the native rainforest, and reintroducing endangered bird species.

Nature Nerd Trivia: Wild Canids

Nature Nerd Trivia: Wild Canids

The Ethiopian wolf is often called the world’s most endangered canid species, with fewer than 500 individuals alive today.Rather, the genetics indicate that native red foxes naturally expanded their range into the southeastern United States.

The Rainbows of Bristol Bay

The Rainbows of Bristol Bay

at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, with a focus on studying the life histories of rainbow trout in streams and lakes of the Bristol Bay drainage.In the Bristol Bay watershed, lake-migrant rainbow trout swim alongside stream-resident forms.

Hawaiʻian Snails: A Tale of Discovery and Rediscovery

Hawaiʻian Snails: A Tale of Discovery and Rediscovery

© Kenneth Hayes & Norine Yeung For years, the conventional wisdom was that Hawaiʻi’s land snails were largely gone, with little left to study, let alone conserve.In fact, a research effort conducted over the past ten years has rediscovered dozens of Hawaiʻian land snail species previously thought extinct.

Finding the Other Hand: How to Practice Science for Impact

Finding the Other Hand: How to Practice Science for Impact

I recently had a chance to check in with two of the authors, Steve Wood and Jon Fisher, environmental scientists with The Nature Conservancy and The Pew Charitable Trusts, respectively, for a wide-ranging discussion on the challenges of turning science into practice and why their paper is more timely than ever – especially as scientists struggle to help inform meaningful change in a world facing increasingly urgent challenges.

The Crocodile Hunter Was My Childhood Hero

The Crocodile Hunter Was My Childhood Hero

And I had Steve Irwin, who loved wildlife with an unabashed enthusiasm that a paralytically self-conscious tween girl could never muster.Irwin taught millions of children like me that wildlife — even the ugly, slimy, and scaly — should be loved.

50 Fish, 50 States: Silver Creek Preserve

50 Fish, 50 States: Silver Creek Preserve

© Hamilton Wallace / TNC I’m on a quest to catch a fish in each of the 50 U.S. states – and to use each adventure as a means to explore conservation, the latest fisheries research and our complicated connections to the natural world.I’ve fished the trico hatch on Silver Creek numerous times.

Charting a Future for People and Nature in Post-COVID India

Charting a Future for People and Nature in Post-COVID India

The group maintains that science and technology can provide important strategies to address these challenges, but they must be implemented in ways that foster human, social and ecological resilience.

Backyard Birding in Central India to Beat Lockdown

Backyard Birding in Central India to Beat Lockdown

© Ashok Biswal The Nature Conservancy in India has been engaging with the local communities and working closely with state government authorities since 2017 to undertake and facilitate cost-effective and pragmatic riparian restoration activities in the selected patches of Narmada riverbank.

Can Duck Poop Spread Invasive Fish?

Can Duck Poop Spread Invasive Fish?

As the authors note in the paper, “Only 0.2% of ingested eggs survived gut passage, yet, given the abundance, diet, and movements of ducks in nature, our results have major implications for biodiversity conservation and invasion dynamics in freshwater ecosystems.”.