Crispr'd Cells Show Promise in First US Human Safety Trial

Crispr'd Cells Show Promise in First US Human Safety Trial

Last year, each cancer patient received infusions of about 100 million of their own T cells, which had been genetically modified in a University of Pennsylvania lab.

A New Crispr Technique Could Fix Almost All Genetic Diseases

A New Crispr Technique Could Fix Almost All Genetic Diseases

But if you want to replace a faulty gene with a healthy one, things get more complicated .In addition to programming a piece of guide RNA to tell Crispr where to cut, you have to provide a copy of the new DNA and then hope the cell’s repair machinery installs it correctly.

A Netflix Series Explores the Brave New World of Crispr

A Netflix Series Explores the Brave New World of Crispr

But just when Unnatural Selection has you convinced that this technology is too new, too dangerous to be let loose on the world, it drops you into a clinic in a rural village, where every person comes down with malaria at least once a year—sometimes taking their lives, especially the young ones.

Netflix's ‘Unnatural Selection’ Trailer Makes Crispr Personal

Netflix's ‘Unnatural Selection’ Trailer Makes Crispr Personal

But the show’s co-creators, Joe Egender and Leeor Kaufman, say DIY Crispr is just one subplot in the larger narrative about what happens when nature can be minutely controlled, when humans might even preside over their own evolution .

A Super-Powered iPhone Chip, a Potential HIV Treatment, and More News

A Super-Powered iPhone Chip, a Potential HIV Treatment, and More News

Apple's iPhone chip might change how you use your phone, scientists are progressing toward a drug-free HIV treatment, and social platforms are considering ditching likes.You can sign up right here to make sure you get the news delivered fresh to your inbox every weekday!

Crispr Can Help Solve Our Looming Food Crisis—Here's How

Crispr Can Help Solve Our Looming Food Crisis—Here's How

Crispr Can Help Solve Our Looming Food Crisis—Here's How. The potential for gene editing to make every acre of land more productive in the face of climate change has captured the imagination of plant scientists, the agtech industry, and governments alike.

The World Health Organization Says No More Gene-Edited Babies

The World Health Organization Says No More Gene-Edited Babies

Eight months after a rogue Chinese scientist revealed he had secretly created the world’s first gene-edited children , the World Health Organization is asking countries to put a stop to any experiments that would lead to the births of more gene-edited humans.

Crispr Gene Editing Could One Day Cut Away Human Pain

Crispr Gene Editing Could One Day Cut Away Human Pain

James Cox, a molecular geneticist at University College London who identified Cameron’s genetic anomaly says his group is now using Crispr in human cell lines to try to mimic her microdeletion and better understand its effects.

A More Humane Livestock Industry, Brought to You By Crispr

A More Humane Livestock Industry, Brought to You By Crispr

Cow 401 and her herdmates were the product of two and a half years of research, Van Eenennaam’s attempt to create a strain of gene-edited cattle specially suited to the needs of the beef industry.

Preparing to Unleash Crispr on an Unprepared World

Preparing to Unleash Crispr on an Unprepared World

The following year, Charpentier teamed up with biochemist Jennifer Doudna, and the pair asked what proved to be the multibillion-dollar question: Could they exploit this system and use it to edit genes?

The Gene Mutation That Could Cure HIV Has a Checkered Past

The Gene Mutation That Could Cure HIV Has a Checkered Past

While the international science community condemned He’s experiment for a host of ethics violations, using Crispr and other gene-editing tools to recreate the protective effects of the CCR5 mutation might lead to treatments so widely available that we don’t have to refer to patients as the London this or the Berlin that any more.

Gene Editing Is Trickier Than Expected—but Fixes Are in Sight

Gene Editing Is Trickier Than Expected—but Fixes Are in Sight

Using a new method for measuring unplanned edits, a team of American, Chinese, and European scientists has found that the same base editor, widely in use by researchers today, actually messes up the genome at an eyebrow-raising rate. Besides the base editors, Steinmetz’s group also tested good ‘ol Crispr 1.0, the gene-editing workhorse of the biological research world.

Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Antibiotics Are Failing Us. Crispr Is Our Glimmer of Hope

Earlier this month, Janssen Pharmaceuticals—a division of Johnson & Johnson—announced an $818 million deal with a small Crispr startup called Locus Biosciences to develop a radical new way to rid the body of disease-causing bacteria, without causing resistance.

The Best Tech Quotes of the Year

The Best Tech Quotes of the Year

Our asshole, I guess.”—A coworker at Google about Anthony Levandowski, the controversial self-driving car engineer. “We are now facing not just a technological crisis but a philosophical crisis.”—Yuval Noah Harari, surely the most-read author in Silicon Valley, in conversation with Tristan Harris, surely one of the most influential voices of the past year.

How Do You Publish the Work of a Scientific Villain?

How Do You Publish the Work of a Scientific Villain?

A paper describing this work is reportedly under peer review, and a second one about additional Crispr experiments in human embryos was rejected by an international journal over ethical and scientific concerns, STAT reported Monday morning.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to CrisprScientists are beginning to grapple with the very real possibility that He’s work may never be awarded publication status, along with its attendant sheen of legitimacy.

US Biotech Firms Made China's Gene-Edited Babies Possible

US Biotech Firms Made China's Gene-Edited Babies Possible

By adding in some slick software and artificially intelligent design, Synthego made ordering Crispr constructs to target any human gene a matter of a few clicks, a few hundred dollars, and waiting for the FedEx driver to show up at your door.When Doudna joined Synthego’s advisory board earlier this year, she described it as an essential company, one that was "poised to transform the industry by making the application of Crispr simpler, faster, and more valuable to innovators previously unable to realize its full potential,” she said in a press release at the time.Of course, He’s team could have obtained Crispr components elsewhere or made them from scratch in his lab at Southern University of Science and Technology, in Shenzhen.

Rogue Scientist Says Another Crispr Pregnancy Is Under Way

Rogue Scientist Says Another Crispr Pregnancy Is Under Way

“The trial is paused due to the current situation,” says He.He is now under investigation by his own university, and other legal bodies in China.After He’s presentation, he took questions from the audience and the moderators, including Lovell-Badge and Matthew Porteus, a Stanford researcher and the scientific founder of Crispr Therapeutics, a company developing Crispr-based drugs to treat genetic diseases.

Scientist Who Crispr’d Babies Bucked His Own Ethics Policy

Scientist Who Crispr’d Babies Bucked His Own Ethics Policy

“Two beautiful little Chinese girls, Lulu and Nana, came crying into the world as healthy as any other babies a few weeks ago,” the scientist, He Jiankiu, said in the first of five promotional videos posted to YouTube hours after MIT Technology Review broke the news.LEARN MOREThe WIRED Guide to CrisprLulu and Nana are reported to have a genetic mutation, courtesy of Crispr, that makes it harder for HIV to invade and infect their white blood cells.

Crispr’s Epic Patent Fight Changed the Course of Biology

Crispr’s Epic Patent Fight Changed the Course of Biology

In addition to the Broad Institute’s claims, UC-Berkeley also has to contend with another foundational patent for Crispr-Cas9 gene editing filed before anyone else in March 2012, by Virginijus Šikšnys, a Lithuanian scientist who shares the prestigious Kavli Prize with Berkeley’s Jennifer Doudna and The University of Vienna’s Emmanuelle Charpentier for their early work on Crispr.

Crispr Halted Muscular Dystrophy in Dogs. Are Humans Next?

Crispr Halted Muscular Dystrophy in Dogs. Are Humans Next?

When researchers at the Royal Veterinary College realized the puppers had a canine version of the most common fatal genetic disease in children—Duchenne muscular dystrophy—they began breeding the sick spaniels with beagles to start a canine colony in the hopes of one day finding a cure.Today, scientists report they’ve halted the progression of the disease in some of those doggy descendants using the gene editing tool known as Crispr.In a study published Thursday in Science, a team led by Eric Olson at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center used Crispr to successfully modify the DNA of four young dogs, reversing the molecular defect responsible for their muscle wasting disease.