A Newfound Neuron Might Help Keep the Brain's Cells in Sync

A Newfound Neuron Might Help Keep the Brain's Cells in Sync

For Vikaas Sohal, a neuroscientist at UC San Francisco, who was not involved in the work, the discovery of these cells might help the field move away from conflicts about gamma rhythms. If they really are clock-like cells, he says, then signs of their timekeeping should show up in the rhythm of the local field potential.

New Analysis Techniques Unearth a Trove of Unusual Minerals

New Analysis Techniques Unearth a Trove of Unusual Minerals

“But the number of discoveries is increasing.” To qualify as new minerals, these materials must be never-before-seen natural combinations of one or more elements in solid form, arranged in a repeating structure.

The Danger in Assange’s Charges, a Memory Experiment, and More News

The Danger in Assange’s Charges, a Memory Experiment, and More News

New charges against Julian Assange threaten all of the press, scientists have figured out how to alter emotional memories, and Memorial Day is coming. New charges unveiled by the Justice Department against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange paint a troublesome picture for him—and for all journalists.

A Bizarre Form of Water May Exist All Over the Universe

A Bizarre Form of Water May Exist All Over the Universe

Paradoxically—but just as physicists squinting at screens in an adjacent room had expected—the atoms froze solid, forming crystalline ice.“You hear the shot,” said Marius Millot of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and “right away you see that something interesting was happening.” Millot co-led the experiment with Federica Coppari, also of Lawrence Livermore.

The Struggle of 'The Twilight Zone' in the Age of Streaming Services

The Struggle of 'The Twilight Zone' in the Age of Streaming Services

File this under "yet another sentence that wouldn't have made any sense in the year 2000": Tonight, the third episode of Jordan Peele's Twilight Zone reboot will become available to stream on CBS All Access.

Noisy Quantum Computers Could Be Good for Chemistry Problems

Noisy Quantum Computers Could Be Good for Chemistry Problems

However, for chemistry simulations, the noise would be representative of the physical environment in which both the chemical system (e.g., a molecule) and the quantum device exist.

The Triumphant Rediscovery of the Biggest Bee on Earth

The Triumphant Rediscovery of the Biggest Bee on Earth

“In a time of biodiversity declines, including for insects, this rediscovery gives us hope that not all is lost and that we have managed to protect not only an amazing bee, but importantly also the unique habitat that is its, and likely many other rare species', home,” says Cornell University entomologist Corrie Moreau, who wasn’t involved in this new work.

James Watson and the Insidiousness of Scientific Racism

James Watson and the Insidiousness of Scientific Racism

The dilemma raises several questions: How does it feel to be a black scientist who owes much to James Watson in general, and in my case, is linked to his specific pedigree?