This Intrepid Robot Is the WALL-E of the Deep Sea

This Intrepid Robot Is the WALL-E of the Deep Sea

“The rover helps us understand how much of that carbon might actually make its way into the sediments in the deep sea,” says MBARI marine biologist Crissy Huffard, who coauthored the new paper.

The Rainbows of Bristol Bay

The Rainbows of Bristol Bay

at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, with a focus on studying the life histories of rainbow trout in streams and lakes of the Bristol Bay drainage.In the Bristol Bay watershed, lake-migrant rainbow trout swim alongside stream-resident forms.

How Hitchhiking Oysters Build New Reefs

How Hitchhiking Oysters Build New Reefs

Australian scientists have discovered that one oyster species — the Sydney rock oyster — forms new reefs with the help of another an unassuming mollusk: the mud whelk.

The Bizarre, Peaty Science of Arctic Wildfires

The Bizarre, Peaty Science of Arctic Wildfires

That, though, would require forest management across swaths of the Arctic, a kind of management we in the US can’t even do right on a small scale .What we’re looking at, then, is yet another complicating factor in the massive complexity that is climate change: When peat burns, it emits lots of CO2, and when peatlands aren’t healthy, they don’t capture any.

Gulf Fisheries Are Under Siege—Now Comes Tropical Storm Barry

Gulf Fisheries Are Under Siege—Now Comes Tropical Storm Barry

A historic slow-moving flood of polluted Mississippi River water loaded with chemicals, pesticides, and human waste from 31 states and two Canadian provinces is draining straight into the marshes and bayous of the Gulf of Mexico —the nurseries of Arnesen’s fishing grounds—upsetting the delicate balance of salinity and destroying the fragile ecosystem in the process.

How Remote Lakes Could Help Unravel the Mysteries of Microplastic

How Remote Lakes Could Help Unravel the Mysteries of Microplastic

The International Institute for Sustainable Development’s Experimental Lakes Area, or ELA, are testing grounds that allow researchers to isolate a pocket of water within a lake and add pollutants like hormones and flame retardants—and now potentially microplastics—and watch how the ecosystem responds.

An IOS App That Secretly Spies on You, And More News

An IOS App That Secretly Spies on You, And More News

Say hello to your new speaker-lamp. A cervix-navigating robot could save the rhinos. To be fair, these rhinos will need a lot more than a cervix-navigating robot to survive.

Drones Drop Poison Bombs to Fight One Island’s Rat Invasion

Drones Drop Poison Bombs to Fight One Island’s Rat Invasion

On Seymour Norte, officials and conservationists are once again banishing the rats, but the war against invasive species for the purity of the world’s islands has only just begun. Fighting invasive species demands constant vigilance, as the return of rats to Seymour Norte shows.

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

For Brown Bears and Salmon, It’s Not Just About Numbers

Looking at streams on Alaska’s Kodiak Island, the researchers found that the varied timing of salmon migrations likely matters as much as abundance. Previous research found that this variance in migration timing among streams matters a lot to brown bears and other wildlife that feed on salmon.

Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

Aquaculture Could Be Conservation’s Secret Weapon

“But we could use aquaculture to replace some of those water filtration benefits, and at the same time grow food.” In places where excess nutrients are a problem, like the Chesapeake Bay, shellfish aquaculture could even help offset the negative environmental impacts of other industries.

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Arctic carbon cycle is speeding up – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

A new NASA-led study using data from the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) shows that carbon in Alaska's North Slope tundra ecosystems spends about 13 percent less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago.

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

An Adorable Rodent Gives a Glimpse Into Earth’s Climate Chaos

While barn owls and western meadowlarks were “losers” during the drought, killdeer and greater roadrunners were “winners.” The blunt-nosed leopard lizard suffered; the side-blotched lizard came up in the world.“The drought kind of knocked down the species that were dominating and allowed the underdogs to do better and stay in the system,” says wildlife ecologist Laura Prugh of the University of Washington, lead author on the new paper in Nature Climate Change.For all the winners and losers, nearly three quarters of species weren’t strongly affected by the drought.

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

New Science Shows Nature’s Potential to Fight Climate Change

Building on a large body of existing research, they divided natural carbon sinks into 20 different pathways and then calculated both their potential for emissions reductions and the associated costs.

New Science Shows Seagrass Meadows Suppress Pathogens

New Science Shows Seagrass Meadows Suppress Pathogens

It was a rough bout of illness while she and her colleagues were studying corals in Indonesia that first focused Nature Conservancy NatureNet Science Fellow Joleah Lamb’s attention on the disease-mitigating possibilities of seagrass meadows.