Coastal flooding likely to be main driver for adaptation

Coastal flooding likely to be main driver for adaptation

New NIWA-led research shows increasing flood risk is going to be what leads people to make changes to adapt to sea-level rise.“Rising seas are slowly causing a trifecta of impacts along coastlines in Aotearoa: increasingly frequent flooding, coastal erosion and even permanent inundation,” says Dr Scott Stephens, NIWA Chief Scientist for Coasts & Estuaries.

Sunny-Day Flooding Is About to Become More Than a Nuisance

Sunny-Day Flooding Is About to Become More Than a Nuisance

Those higher sea levels coupled with another lunar cycle will drive a national leap in high-tide flooding, starting with what Thompson and researchers call “a year of inflection.”.

The largest flood flow ever measured

The largest flood flow ever measured

Flood flows on the Buller River this month were the largest of any river in Aotearoa New Zealand in almost 100 years, NIWA measurements show.Meanwhile, a NIWA monitoring station on the Buller River at Te Kuha, about 10km upstream, was continuously recording water levels throughout the flood.

The Tide Is High—and Getting Higher

The Tide Is High—and Getting Higher

A new study shows that nuisance flooding is exacerbated by dredging and the construction of piers and jetties that were intended to make coastal living easier but are in fact redirecting the flow of incoming ocean water and making high tides higher than ever before.

The Biblical Flood That Will Drown California

The Biblical Flood That Will Drown California

The cataclysm cut off telegraph communication with the East Coast, swamped the state’s new capital, and submerged the entire Central Valley under as much as 15 feet of water.

Small sea-level rises to drive more intense flooding, say scientists

Small sea-level rises to drive more intense flooding, say scientists

That was one of the findings in research, published this month in leading scientific journal Natural Hazards and Earth Science Systems, in which NIWA researchers describe how small increases in sea level rise are likely to drive huge increases in the frequency of coastal flooding in the next 20–30 years.

Think Flash Floods Are Bad? Buckle Up for Flash Droughts

Think Flash Floods Are Bad? Buckle Up for Flash Droughts

For scientists to actually quantify how things might get worse in the future thanks to climate change, they need objective measurements.

Floodplains: Protecting & Restoring an Overlooked Ecosystem

Floodplains: Protecting & Restoring an Overlooked Ecosystem

A new tool developed by The Nature Conservancy provides answers, using a research-based approach to help agencies, communities and other stakeholders obtain the information they need to prioritize floodplain protection and restoration.

Recovery: Restoring the Floodplain Forest

Recovery: Restoring the Floodplain Forest

An American Elm. Photo © Diane Cook and Len Jenshel / TNC A hot August sun punched through rain clouds as my wife Donna and I exited our truck at the Fannie Stebbins Wildlife Refuge, in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, now part of the Silvio O.

Retreat? Pish. Democrats Dare Not Speak Climate Change's ‘R’ Word

Retreat? Pish. Democrats Dare Not Speak Climate Change's ‘R’ Word

But when moderators and audience members asked the Democratic hopefuls whether they’d relocate people away from coastal areas prone to flooding, the candidates called it virtually everything other than retreat.

The Cost of Rising Seas: More Than $400 Billion (and Lots of Angst)

The Cost of Rising Seas: More Than $400 Billion (and Lots of Angst)

In Boston, where many neighborhoods have been built and recently expanded in low-lying areas, an estimated $2.4 billion will be needed over the next several decades to protect the city from flooding, one study says.

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

New reports highlight flood risk under climate change

Two reports released today by NIWA and the Deep South National Science Challenge reveal new information about how many New Zealanders, how many buildings and how much infrastructure could be affected by extreme river and coastal flooding from storms and sea-level rise.

Climate Change Is Bringing Epic Flooding to the Midwest

Climate Change Is Bringing Epic Flooding to the Midwest

Super-soaked spring soils, unplanted fields, record-rising rivers, runaway barges—this is in all likelihood what climate change looks like for the middle of the country.

The Mueller Report Is Here, Apple's Big Event, and More News

The Mueller Report Is Here, Apple's Big Event, and More News

The Mueller Report Is Here, Apple's Big Event, and More News. Getting a good night's sleep is the latest hot trend, and of course there are gadgets for that .

Those Midwestern Floods Are Expected to Get Much, Much Worse

Those Midwestern Floods Are Expected to Get Much, Much Worse

Fueled by rapidly melting snowpack and a forecast of more rainstorms in the next few weeks, federal officials warn that 200 million people in 25 states face a risk through May. Floodwaters coursing through Nebraska have already forced tens of thousands of people to flee and have caused $1.3 billion in damage.

What if We Could Use Nature to Prevent Disasters?

What if We Could Use Nature to Prevent Disasters?

Such solutions include widening of natural flood plains, protecting and expanding wetlands, restoring oyster and coral reefs and investing in urban green spaces that reduce run-off.

One Species Loves Our Climate-Wrecking Ways: Fire Ants!

One Species Loves Our Climate-Wrecking Ways: Fire Ants!

With human-driven climate change not only heating up the world but exacerbating hurricanes and wildfires, fire ants are primed to reap their rewards. Fire ant colonies with multiple queens are denser—400 to 500 mounds an acre, instead of 40—and take more of a toll on the species around them.

Why do people live in flood-prone areas? Reflections from Dar es Salaam

Why do people live in flood-prone areas? Reflections from Dar es Salaam

“They should not be there; they know it’s not safe!” Citizens, journalists, and policymakers, express disbelief that people relocated to safer parts of the city return to their former, flood-prone neighborhoods.

Fieldays - farming for the future

Fieldays - farming for the future

NIWA’s Chief Scientist, Climate, Atmosphere and Hazards, Dr Sam Dean says that by making sound choices now, and in the future, farmers can adapt, increase resilience, and reduce risks and costs for themselves and future owners of their farms.

Solutions: Early warning of PNG floods

Solutions: Early warning of PNG floods

This year, NIWA completed a project that aims to help build community resilience against flooding in the Bumbu River and contribute to improving Papua New Guinea’s disaster preparedness in the face of increasing climate-related disasters. NIWA and PNG staff installed a hydro-meteorological monitoring network and early warning system for floods, in a pilot scheme for the river.

A say on the sea shore

A say on the sea shore

“The Guidance provides methods that can be used for decision making under deeply uncertain conditions about the future, such as how fast sea level will rise, or how community coping capacity and vulnerability will change,” says Dr Stephens.

Weatherwatch: slower tropical storms are raising flood threat

Weatherwatch: slower tropical storms are raising flood threat

Falls in the average tracking speeds of hurricanes and typhoons, attributed to global warming, put more lives at risk Research published in Nature earlier this year showed that the average speed at which tropical storms track has slowed down by 10% since 1949.

'Warning of what has already arrived': Florence is a climate change triple threat | Michael Mann

'Warning of what has already arrived': Florence is a climate change triple threat | Michael Mann

If we don’t act on climate change, the destruction potential of slow-moving storms such as Harvey and Florence will only get worse

5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence

5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence

Experts say you should never drive through fast-moving water.5 Dangers of Flooding in Hurricane Florence Experts provide the steps you can take to avoid them. Experts say you should never drive through fast-moving water.Drenching rains were inundating North Carolina on Friday as Hurricane Florence crawled inland at three miles an hour.

A Nuclear Plant Braces for Impact With Hurricane Florence

A Nuclear Plant Braces for Impact With Hurricane Florence

But Lochbaum points out that history proves such preparation might not be enough.In its 2012 post-Fukushima review, Florida Power & Light told the NRC that flood protections at its St. Lucie plant on South Hutchinson Island were adequate, despite failing to discover six electrical conduits with missing seals in one of the emergency core cooling systems.

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

The first effects of the now Category 1 Hurricane Florence are already being felt in the Carolinas, where the storm is expected to make landfall later today, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

Hurricanes can cause enormous damage inland, but emergency plans focus on coasts

Hurricanes can cause enormous damage inland, but emergency plans focus on coasts

What I have seen is that inland river flooding linked to hurricanes and heavy storms is a huge risk in the Southeast, but receives far less attention in emergency plans than coastal areas.

What the world needs now to fight climate change: More swamps

What the world needs now to fight climate change: More swamps

Wetland soil carbon, accumulated over millennia and now being released to the atmosphere at an accelerating pace, cannot be regained within the next few decades, which are a critical window for addressing climate change.

Wisconsin's Floods Are Catastrophic—and Only Getting Worse

Wisconsin's Floods Are Catastrophic—and Only Getting Worse

The Kickapoo River in southwest Wisconsin rose to record levels — as high as six feet above the previous high water mark — producing damage that local emergency management officials described as “breathtaking.”In the tiny Wisconsin town of Gays Mills, this is the third catastrophic flood in 10 years.

Building housing on flood plains another sign of growing inequality

Building housing on flood plains another sign of growing inequality

Yet all parties involved in housing know that cities are facing more rainfall and flooding due to climate change. However, the waterfront area still remains a flood plain, and is still affected by storm surges associated with climate change.