The Iguana Invasion

The Iguana Invasion

Photo © Lisa Ballard A green iguana is not exactly Godzilla, but at least in Florida, people are still preparing their defenses.An herbivore that eats an occasional cricket or tree snail, the green iguana is now consuming large quantities of native Florida flora, like the nickerbean, a plant that the rare Miami blue butterfly relies on.

Recovery: How Herbicides Can Save Fish and Wildlife

Recovery: How Herbicides Can Save Fish and Wildlife

“In 1995 we sold 12,000 acres of the preserve to the BLM; and we’ve been working cooperatively on the whole area, using an integrated approach.” This, she explained, included herbicides, hand pulling where possible, and biological control via introduced insects that coevolved with the weeds (and which, when caged, had passed rigorous “starvation tests” by dying rather than eating related native plants).

Why Hurricane Michael's Storm Surge Is So High

Why Hurricane Michael's Storm Surge Is So High

It’s measured as the height of the water above the normal predicted tide, and how bad it is depends mainly on three things: wind speed, shoreline shape, and timing.https://twitter.com/NHC_Surge/status/1049770886943924224Typically, the strongest surge occurs with the eyewall of the storm.

Water usage in US at LOWEST level since 1970 as America battles climate change

Water usage in US at LOWEST level since 1970 as America battles climate change

Water usage in US at LOWEST level since 1970 as America battles climate change WATER use across the US is at its lowest point since the 1970s, according to research, proving Americans are making great strides to combat climate change.

A New 'Brown Tide' Could Make Florida's Dangerous Red Tide Worse

A New 'Brown Tide' Could Make Florida's Dangerous Red Tide Worse

The beaches of southwest Florida are once again graveyards for marine life, thanks to a deadly "red tide" algal bloom floating just beneath the surface of the water offshore.

Climate Change Is Coming for Underwater Archaeological Sites

Climate Change Is Coming for Underwater Archaeological Sites

For now, Wright describes her reading of these risks as “theoretical, hypothetical, and logical,” meaning that though there’s fairly limited research within archaeology, these forecasts square with projections that researchers in other fields have arrived at, after starting to scrutinize the future effects of climate change on, for instance, ocean chemistry, reefs, and other marine life.Storm surges and violent weather pose an immediate threat: Hurricanes tracking right over shipwrecks can splinter them into oblivion, or at least strip protective coverings and expose timbers, coral-covered cannonballs, and other features to battering currents and wind.