Meet the Raptors That Eat Avocados (and Other Fruit)

Meet the Raptors That Eat Avocados (and Other Fruit)

Fitzsimons found that frugivory had been observed in black kites only in the savannas of central Ivory Coast in Africa, where the birds were observed eating oil palm fruits.

Growing Crops Under Solar Panels? Now There’s a Bright Idea

Growing Crops Under Solar Panels? Now There’s a Bright Idea

Khanna will be studying what the ideal solar array might be for a particular crop, for instance, if it needs bigger or smaller gaps between panels to let sunlight pass through.

Why Sick Bats Self-Isolate

Why Sick Bats Self-Isolate

When bats hibernate in caves they often cluster up like they do in night roosts, but there’s less activity.Weinberg and postdoctoral researcher Kelsey Moreno studied Egyptian fruit bats with some animals in the colony receiving a sick-like protein to trigger an immune response.

There’s a Python Living in My Rain Gutter

There’s a Python Living in My Rain Gutter

Feeding rainbow lorikeets © Benjamin James Moy / TNC Photo Contest 2019 Apparently, this isn’t the first time a python has taken up residence in the house.

The Deliciously Surprising Science of Taste

The Deliciously Surprising Science of Taste

“But this has been converted down the years into a more extreme version of the taste map that says sweet is at the front of the tongue, bitter is at the back, and salty and sour at the sides,” says Robert Margolskee, director and president of Philadelphia's Monell Chemical Senses Center, which researches taste and smell.

The Most Complete Brain Map Ever Is Here: A Fly's 'Connectome'

The Most Complete Brain Map Ever Is Here: A Fly's 'Connectome'

Janelia researchers announced a major step in that quest on Wednesday, releasing a wiring diagram of the fly brain that contains 25,000 neurons and the 20 million connections between them.Rubin hopes wiring diagrams such as this one, showing neurons involved in navigation, will give researchers a better sense of how brain circuits work.

The Tao of Goo: Lessons From a Slime Workshop

The Tao of Goo: Lessons From a Slime Workshop

Katie Anstett, a 16-year-old slime-trepreneur of Instagram fame, guided newbies as they shaped their own goo, as part of the workshop hosted by WIRED's Louise Matsakis.

200 students compete to solve big science challenges at Auckland Science and Technology Fair

200 students compete to solve big science challenges at Auckland Science and Technology Fair

Everything from eating brownies made with bugs to a substitute for stickers on fruit has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Auckland Science and Technology Fair.

Avocado Time Machine takes top prize at the NIWA BOP Science Fair

Avocado Time Machine takes top prize at the NIWA BOP Science Fair

Frustration with buying fruit and vegetables that are never ready to eat prompted a 13-year-old Tauranga girl to a design a machine to help.Bay of Plenty Science Fair 2019 winner Anamaya Taylor.

Your Apples May Soon Be Picked By Laser-Shooting Robots

Your Apples May Soon Be Picked By Laser-Shooting Robots

The robot (it’s thus far nameless, in case you were wondering), developed by a company called Abundant Robotics, navigates the rows between apple trees using lidar, which paints the world with lasers , and images the fruits with machine vision.“In real time it’s recognizing apples,” says Dan Steere, CEO of Abundant.

Winter Warmer: Make Tea from Local, Wild Plants

Winter Warmer: Make Tea from Local, Wild Plants

It looks and tastes like fruity, store-bought tea, but it’s made from dried bog Labrador tea, wild strawberry and blueberry leaves. Like the foliage of wild blueberry and strawberry plants, raspberry leaves also make a fine fruit tea.

Three Lizards in a Beer Can

Three Lizards in a Beer Can

There are two species of alligator lizard in Oregon, the northern and southern. Both species of alligator lizard regularly seek out shelter under rocks and logs, and in crevices. The three alligator lizards popping out of the beer can is undoubtedly a funny and surprising find.

A New Robotic Fly Dips and Dives Like the Real Thing

A New Robotic Fly Dips and Dives Like the Real Thing

In this sense it’s autonomous to a degree, though the researchers remotely pilot it around.To fly forward, DelFly’s motors tilt the two pairs of wings forward, like a helicopter. Taken together, these wing controls produce a range of maneuvers to rival that of the fruit fly.Animation by TU Delft