Think Climate Change Is Messy? Wait Until Geoengineering

Think Climate Change Is Messy? Wait Until Geoengineering

This is the idea behind a solar geoengineering technique known as stratospheric aerosol injection, only instead of a pigment, engineers would spray a sulfate that bounces some of the sun’s radiation back into space, an attempt at cooling the planet.

Geoengineering Is the Only Solution to Our Climate Calamities

Geoengineering Is the Only Solution to Our Climate Calamities

Geoengineering proposals generally fall into two categories: removing carbon from the atmosphere, or shielding Earth from solar radiation.European and Asian governments support geoengineering in principle, and it now has bipartisan support in the US, which recently approved $4 million for the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to assess solar climate interventions.

Sorry, But We Can’t Just Hack Our Way Out of Climate Doom

Sorry, But We Can’t Just Hack Our Way Out of Climate Doom

“Suddenly stopping solar geoengineering could cause the climate to change very rapidly, allowing ecosystems and economies less time to adapt to new conditions,” says Proctor.

The Side Effects of Solar Geoengineering Could Be Minimal

The Side Effects of Solar Geoengineering Could Be Minimal

The Side Effects of Solar Geoengineering Could Be Minimal JPL/NASA It sounds like a drastic course of action: inject stuff high into Earth’s atmosphere to reflect a little sunlight and help counteract global warming.

We Need Massive Change to Avoid Climate Hell

We Need Massive Change to Avoid Climate Hell

Meaning, we’re looking at unprecedented change, what is essentially the restructuring of civilization.“The report has sent a very clear message that if we don't act now and have substantial reductions in carbon dioxide emissions over the next decade, we are really making it very challenging to impossible to keep warming below 1.5 degrees,” said the IPCC’s Jim Skea at a press conference announcing the report, a massive survey by almost 100 authors (and 1,000 reviewers) citing 6,000 studies.The 2015 Paris Agreement included the 1.5 goal at the urging of island nations, which rising seas are threatening to drown.