Let's Rebuild the Broken Meat Industry—Without Animals

Let's Rebuild the Broken Meat Industry—Without Animals

In a full page ad in The New York Times, the CEO of Tyson Foods warned that the “food supply chain is breaking.” In response, the government has rushed in to save the industry, with President Donald Trump enacting the Defense Production Act to keep slaughterhouses running, deeming them critical infrastructure.

Silicon Valley Rethinks the (Home) Office

Silicon Valley Rethinks the (Home) Office

The tech industry was full of early adopters, but a survey from the Society for Human Resource Management in March found that two-thirds of US companies were “taking steps to allow employees to work from home who don't normally do so.” The mass exodus from the office is likely to change the way teams operate in the long-term.

Facebook and the Folly of Self-Regulation

Facebook and the Folly of Self-Regulation

What problems does the new Facebook review board propose to solve?.It has no influence on the sorts of harassment that regularly occur on Facebook or (Facebook-owned) WhatsApp. It won’t dictate policy for Facebook Groups, where much of the most dangerous content thrives.

3 Things to Consider Before Signing Up for a Free Trial

3 Things to Consider Before Signing Up for a Free Trial

But ever since communities around the globe started sheltering in place as part of a widespread effort to curb the spread of Covid-19 , various apps have tweaked their subscriptions and blasted out marketing emails to offer potential customers free trials.

Flying Cars Could Take Off Soon, If We Let the Military Help

Flying Cars Could Take Off Soon, If We Let the Military Help

Our new program, Agility Prime, leverages unique Air Force assets—test ranges, safety certifications, and military missions capable of logging steady flight hours—to build confidence in the technology, attract investors, and hopefully expedite domestic commercialization.Flying cars aren’t the only commercial technology the military can help accelerate.

Covid-19 Is Pulling the Plug on Clean Energy Jobs

Covid-19 Is Pulling the Plug on Clean Energy Jobs

The first thing Solar States did was distribute masks and gloves to workers, company founder Micah Gold-Markel told Grist.Solar States’ 30 laid-off employees are among more than 106,000 clean energy workers who lost their jobs in March, according to a new analysis released last Wednesday.

Yet Another Consequence of the Pandemic: More Plastic Waste

Yet Another Consequence of the Pandemic: More Plastic Waste

If oil, and therefore plastic, is cheap to begin with—and the coronavirus crisis has thoroughly cratered the price of oil—it doesn’t make economic sense for a company to process and sell recycled materials if they end up being more expensive than the virgin plastic another company is making.

Google Is Opening a New Studio to Make Stadia Games

Google Is Opening a New Studio to Make Stadia Games

This week, we've got news about Google Stadia, Riot Games, and some more coronavirus updates.According to a blog post from Google's head of Stadia games, Jade Raymond, the company is opening a new studio dedicated to developing content for the streaming console.

Startup Guesty Under Investigation for Illegal Airbnb Bookings in NYC

Startup Guesty Under Investigation for Illegal Airbnb Bookings in NYC

Soto was right, NYC’s short-term rental market was booming—but what he failed to mention was that it was also largely illegal .On Monday, just four days after Soto’s presentation, the mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement formally announced it had opened an investigation into Guesty, saying that the bulk of the company’s business in New York has likely been unlawful.

Is Our Love of Pets a Conservation Crisis?

Is Our Love of Pets a Conservation Crisis?

Christie documents a startling array of issues associated with pets: free-roaming dogs and cats killing wildlife, the pet trade depleting wild bird and reptile populations, pet food depleting wild fisheries and increasing meat production and much more.

AI Can Do Great Things—if It Doesn't Burn the Planet

AI Can Do Great Things—if It Doesn't Burn the Planet

And as the damage caused by climate change becomes more apparent, AI experts are increasingly troubled by those energy demands.“The concern is that machine-learning algorithms in general are consuming more and more energy, using more data, training for longer and longer,” says Sasha Luccioni, a postdoctoral researcher at Mila, an AI research institute in Canada.

A Surge of New Plastic Is About to Hit the Planet

A Surge of New Plastic Is About to Hit the Planet

The World Economic Forum predicts plastic production will double in the next 20 years.“In the context of a world trying to shift off of fossil fuels as an energy source, this is where [oil and gas companies] see the growth,” said Steven Feit, a staff attorney at the Center for International Environmental Law, an advocacy group.

A Move to Make Auto-Safety Features Speak the Same Language

A Move to Make Auto-Safety Features Speak the Same Language

All six of those terms have been used by important auto industry organizations—regulators at the US Department of Transportation, standards developers at SAE International, and influential research organization Thatcham Research—to describe automatic emergency braking systems.

When the Transportation Revolution Hit the Real World

When the Transportation Revolution Hit the Real World

And that was 2015—just the halfway point of the decade in which the software-loving tech industry charged into the physical world of transportation.Nissan targeted 2020 for the market debut of its self-driving car.

Why Big Data Has Been (Mostly) Good for Music

Why Big Data Has Been (Mostly) Good for Music

Following four consecutive years of double-digit growth, total year-end revenues are expected to break the $10 billion mark this year, inching ever closer to the sales numbers the industry hit during the glory days of CDs. Courtesy of SpotifyWith all that money back on the table, record labels are scouting new talent again.

Meet the Mad Scientist Who Wrote the Book on How to Hunt Hackers

Meet the Mad Scientist Who Wrote the Book on How to Hunt Hackers

And for a smaller core of cybersecurity practitioners within that massive readership, it’s become a kind of legend: the ur-narrative of a lone hacker hunter, a text that has inspired an entire generation of network defenders chasing their own anomalies through a vastly larger, infinitely more malicious internet.

On Farming YouTube, Emu Eggs and Hay Bales Find Loyal Fans

On Farming YouTube, Emu Eggs and Hay Bales Find Loyal Fans

Buxton says YouTube has seen an influx of new creators who specifically chronicle what it’s like to open a farm after living in a city or working a corporate job.

Melting Ski Resorts Have a Snow Machine Problem

Melting Ski Resorts Have a Snow Machine Problem

At one resort in the Swiss Alps, for example, snow depth during the winter is now roughly 40 percent lower on average than it was in the period from 1909 to 1988.More than 60 percent of the world’s ski slopes are currently supplemented by snowmaking machines, according to industry analyst Laurent Vanat.

The WIRED Guide to Influencers

The WIRED Guide to Influencers

Influencers like Luka Sabbat, a model-turned-actor with two million followers on Instagram, can charge upwards of $40,000 to promote products in story and feed posts.

The Super-Optimized Dirt That Helps Keep Racehorses Safe

The Super-Optimized Dirt That Helps Keep Racehorses Safe

It began with Psychedelicat, a horse that would have remained unremarkable for the rest of his life, were it not for the precise timing of his death.

Microsoft Is Taking Quantum Computers to the Cloud

Microsoft Is Taking Quantum Computers to the Cloud

Microsoft’s model is more like the existing computing industry, where cloud providers allow customers to choose processors from companies such as Intel and AMD, says William Hurley, CEO of startup Strangeworks, which offers a service for programmers to build and collaborate with quantum computing tools from IBM, Google, and others.

Andrew Yang Wants a Thorium Reactor by 2027. Good Luck, Buddy

Andrew Yang Wants a Thorium Reactor by 2027. Good Luck, Buddy

Plenty of countries, most notably China , are investing heavily in molten-salt reactor research in general and thorium reactors in particular.

Corporate America's Second War With the Rule of Law

Corporate America's Second War With the Rule of Law

Last month, after a fierce lobbying battle, California passed a law that will likely end up mandating that companies in the “gig economy,” such as Uber, treat gig workers as employees .

It’s Time to Push Tech Forward, and Rebuild What It Broke

It’s Time to Push Tech Forward, and Rebuild What It Broke

In 1904, a group of Canadian workers began the hard slog of constructing the world's longest bridge, across the Saint Lawrence River just south of the city of Quebec.

EVs Fire Up Pyroswitches to Cut Risk of Shock After a Crash

EVs Fire Up Pyroswitches to Cut Risk of Shock After a Crash

Bosch developed the CG912 semiconductor chip for triggering airbags, but it works just as well for sparking a tiny guillotine to cut an electric vehicle’s high-voltage cables.

Decades-Old Code Is Putting Millions of Critical Devices at Risk

Decades-Old Code Is Putting Millions of Critical Devices at Risk

Today Armis, the Department of Homeland Security, the Food and Drug Administration, and a broad swath of so-called real-time operating system and device companies disclosed that Urgent/11, a suite of network protocol bugs, exist in far more platforms than originally believed.

CEOs of Exxon, Occidental, Chevron, Others Respond to Oil and Gas Climate Initiative

CEOs of Exxon, Occidental, Chevron, Others Respond to Oil and Gas Climate Initiative

Here are some highlights: Ben van Beurden, CEO, Royal Dutch Shell: “Ultimately, (the) Paris (agreement on climate) is going to be met..In the end it is the responsibility of industry, companies like us, to make sure that the transition is going to be as orderly as possible and not going to be disruptive.”.

The EPA Says Methane Rules Are Bad for Industry—It's Wrong

The EPA Says Methane Rules Are Bad for Industry—It's Wrong

In 2018, researchers at the Environmental Defense Fund along with scientists at 12 universities and two federal agencies published a paper in the journal Science concluding that the amount of methane leaking from oil and gas operations was 30 million metric tons per year, or about 60 percent more than EPA estimates.

For Young Female Coders, Internship Interviews Can Be Toxic

For Young Female Coders, Internship Interviews Can Be Toxic

In interviews with WIRED, four Girls Who Code alumnae pursuing undergraduate degrees in computer science and one recent graduate described positive internship experiences including supportive work environments and mentorship from tech company executives, but also faced persistent messages that they did not belong and were not as suited to coding as men.

Student buzzing after winning Waikato science fair

Student buzzing after winning Waikato science fair

A 12-year-old has taken on the most damaging honey bee parasite in the world to win the NIWA Waikato Science and Technology Fair.He compared the use of oxalic acid via cardboard strips and vaporisation on several beehives to determine which method was the most effective.