Space Photos of the Week: An Eternal Voyage of Discovery

Space Photos of the Week: An Eternal Voyage of Discovery

Voyager 2 had a bit more to do; not only would it also visit Jupiter and Saturn, it would become the first spacecraft to fly by Uranus and Neptune.Photograph: NASA/JPLAfter traveling about 400 million miles, Voyager 2 arrived at Saturn, where it snapped this seemingly sideways photo of the ringed beauty.

Space Photos of the Week: Keeping an Eye on Jupiter's Storms

Space Photos of the Week: Keeping an Eye on Jupiter's Storms

You can see the windy bands of Jupiter, as well as the series of white storms also called the “String of Pearls.”Photograph: Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSSThis is the view from only 11,000 miles above the surface.

Space Photos of the Week: Europa! Attempt No Landing There

Space Photos of the Week: Europa! Attempt No Landing There

The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa looms large in this newly-reprocessed color view, made from images taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s.Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI InstituteOur final image in this series shows more chaos terrain in a region called Chaos Near Agenor Linea.

Space Photos of the Week: Awesome Planets and Ancient Gods

Space Photos of the Week: Awesome Planets and Ancient Gods

Photograph: NASA/JPL/USGSThe ancient Romans named this planet Venus, after the goddess of love and beauty, because it shined so brightly and beautifully in the sky.

Space Photos of the Week: Pretty Planets, Gorgeous Galaxies

Space Photos of the Week: Pretty Planets, Gorgeous Galaxies

Gill/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSSNASA’s Cassini spacecraft spent 13 years orbiting Saturn and studying the planet and its moons in depth.Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science InstituteDo you see a penguin?Photograph:NASA/JPL-CaltechOnce you're done, head over here to look at more space photos.

A Star's Auroras Light the Way to a New Exoplanet

A Star's Auroras Light the Way to a New Exoplanet

As the moon rotates around its host planet, this charged gas swipes across Jupiter’s magnetic field lines “like plucking strings on a guitar,” said Nichols, who studies space-based magnetic fields.

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Space Photos of the Week: Starkiller Base? Nope, Just Real-Life Icy Moons

Photograph: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research InstitutePerhaps the most famous moon in the solar system (aside from our own) is Jupiter’s Europa.Photograph: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteIn 1989 after visiting the outer planets, Voyager 2 flew past Neptune and its large moon Triton.

Space Photos of the Week: The Jupiter Chronicles

Space Photos of the Week: The Jupiter Chronicles

The powerful Hubble Space Telescope in orbit around Earth takes an astoundingly detailed look at the same planet: You can see its telltale bands, the iconic Great Red Spot, and smaller individual storms.

Your Brain Cleans Itself, This Jet Lands Itself, and More News

Your Brain Cleans Itself, This Jet Lands Itself, and More News

Brains are cleaning and planes are intervening, but first: a deadly Halloween cartoon .Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less.Scientists now know how sleep cleans toxins from the brain.

Space Photos of the Week: Oh Pioneers!

Space Photos of the Week: Oh Pioneers!

Not only were they the first spacecraft to visit the asteroid belt, Jupiter, and Saturn; they even carried with them a plaque that carried a message on behalf of all humankind.

Space Photos of the Week: Spying on Jupiter

Space Photos of the Week: Spying on Jupiter

Photograph: Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSSDid you know Jupiter has rings?Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRIThis May, the spacecraft swooped outward in its orbit and captured this stunning photo of Jupiter and its turbulent atmosphere from 11,600 miles away.

Space Photos of the Week: Hurricane Dorian and Other Spirals

Space Photos of the Week: Hurricane Dorian and Other Spirals

We have the Voyager program to thank for some of this week’s spirals: When Voyager 1 first flew past Jupiter in 1979, it photographed the monster tempest swirling around and over on itself, and in 1989 Voyager 2 flew past Neptune and spied a small spiral storm that NASA nicknamed “Scooter.” Farther beyond are galaxies like our own spiral that contain gorgeous illuminated arms speckled with starlight.

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter’s Big Storm Is Blowing Over

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter’s Big Storm Is Blowing Over

This 300-year-old storm used to be huge—so big it could hold nearly four Earths, although over the past few decades it has been shrinking and no one knows why.#Space Photos of the Week #Jupiter #solar eclipse.

Space Photos of the Week: A Tribute to Voyager’s Twin Trippers

Space Photos of the Week: A Tribute to Voyager’s Twin Trippers

Space Photos of the Week: A Tribute to Voyager’s Twin Trippers. In late August and early September of 1977, NASA launched twin spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2. However, after their revolutionary discoveries, NASA extended the missions and sent Voyager 2 onward to Uranus and Neptune.

Companies Can Predict Climate Catastrophes for You—as a Service

Companies Can Predict Climate Catastrophes for You—as a Service

Jupiter explicitly incorporates climate change into its models for catastrophe risk, both proprietary and public, and then offers that knowledge to the kind of people who might lose money when the floods, fires, storms, and heat waves really kick in.

Space Photos of the Week: Black Holes and Jellyfish Rainbows

Space Photos of the Week: Black Holes and Jellyfish Rainbows

Space Photos of the Week: Black Holes and Jellyfish Rainbows. This is a big week for space—including news from our local planets, crazy rockets from NASA making jellyfish rainbows in the sky, and oh, no big deal, just the first-ever photo of a black hole.

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter Is a Storm-Eat-Storm World

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter Is a Storm-Eat-Storm World

NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its HiRISE camera capture the surface of the planet in unprecedented detail, and that includes dunes like the ones seen here. Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, stars, and galaxies aren’t even the half of it.

Space Photos of the Week: The Life and Death of Stars

Space Photos of the Week: The Life and Death of Stars

Consider these leftovers from a violent death some 20,000 light years away, a supernova remnant called G54.1+0.3. In this image (the nebula NGC 1333, about 1,000 light years from Earth) these specific Herbig-Haro objects, numbered 7 to 11, are speeding away from the very young star SVS 13, which had spit out highly energized jets of gas that then interacted with surrounding clouds.

Space Photos of the Week: Juno Spies Jupiter's Mesmerizing Clouds

Space Photos of the Week: Juno Spies Jupiter's Mesmerizing Clouds

Space Photos of the Week: Juno Spies Jupiter's Mesmerizing Clouds Take a second with this one. This is Io. This infrared image taken by the Juno spacecraft from some 290,000 miles away, reveals what looks like a bad case of space chicken pox, but those bright spots, all of them, are actually volcanoes.

Space Photos of the Week: Thanks, Solar System Voyagers

Space Photos of the Week: Thanks, Solar System Voyagers

But there was one fantastic finale for the Voyager probes as they wrapped up work in the solar system.On February 14, 1990—Valentines Day—Voyager 1 turned back to face Earth from 4 billion miles away, and took its final photo.

Space Photos of the Week: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagon

Space Photos of the Week: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagon

They also note distinct concentrations of smaller haze particles inside compared with the outside.Jupiter’s candy-cane, red and white color scheme is eye-catching, but it turns out there is more to the story: When NASA’s Juno swung by and captured detailed photos researchers noted clumps of cyclones.

Space Photos of the Week: Inside the Nebulae Where Stars Are Born

Space Photos of the Week: Inside the Nebulae Where Stars Are Born

For the youngest and brightest stellar objects, look no further than the Rho Ophiuchi cloud and the Carina Nebula.Closer to home, the Juno spacecraft is also producing jaw-dropping images, but of Jupiter.