The Cutest Way to Fight Climate Change? Send in the Otters

The Cutest Way to Fight Climate Change? Send in the Otters

But since the 18th century, California's kelp forest has been steadily mowed down by purple urchins, thanks to the massacre of their natural predator—the sea otter—hunted for its one-of-a-kind fur.Thanks in part to this first-of-its-kind program, the sea otter population along the California coast has swelled to 3,000.

Urchin Slayers Are Trying to Save the Underwater Rainforest

Urchin Slayers Are Trying to Save the Underwater Rainforest

The resulting “urchin barrens,” as divers call them, can stretch hundreds of miles, with scientists reporting earlier this year that some Northern California kelp forests have suffered 95 percent loss since 2012.Kelp are key to much of the West Coast’s marine biodiversity.

A New Project Maps the Pacific Coast's Critical Kelp Forests

A New Project Maps the Pacific Coast's Critical Kelp Forests

Researchers are using centuries-old British sea charts and advanced technology, such as camera drones and satellite images, to trace shifts in the abundance and distribution of kelp beds over time, said geographer Maycira Costa.

Scientists listen to the sound of photosynthesising seaweeds

Scientists listen to the sound of photosynthesising seaweeds

While measuring the sound produced by the bubbles could be used as a cheap alternative to estimate algal cover and ecosystem health in coral reefs, NIWA scientists say there is also potential to use it to learn more about New Zealand kelp forests.

Managing Fisheries in the Face of Climate Change

Managing Fisheries in the Face of Climate Change

For these reasons, our California Oceans Team at The Nature Conservancy recently convened a group of scientists and practitioners to develop solutions for managing fisheries in a changing climate.