Using Science & Culture to Assess Billabong Health

Using Science & Culture to Assess Billabong Health

“If they don’t have a fence around the billabong, [feral] buffalos can destroy it and prevent us from hunting for bush food, like water lilies,” says fellow Yangbala Ranger Santa Louise Morris, who is also studying at Macquarie.

The Covid-19 Newsletter That's by Doctors for Doctors

The Covid-19 Newsletter That's by Doctors for Doctors

When they’re not treating Covid-19 patients in the intensive care unit, the eight doctors on the FLARE team work a second job: updating fellow physicians on the latest novel coronavirus research and debunking the freshest unproven theories floating around on social media.

FAO - News Article: Traditional farming system in Brazil added to global agricultural heritage list

FAO - News Article: Traditional farming system in Brazil added to global agricultural heritage list

Farmers known as Sempre-vivas flower gatherers from Espinhaço Mountain Range won recognition for their crucial role in enhancing biodiversity and preserving traditional knowledge.

An Astronomer Explains Black Holes at 5 Levels of Difficulty

An Astronomer Explains Black Holes at 5 Levels of Difficulty

Perhaps you even know about things like event horizons, the boundary outside of which escape becomes possible, and gravitational waves , the ripples that black holes generate in the cosmic fabric when they collide.

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

WIRED's 7 Big Science Stories That Shaped 2019

Another private forensics lab, in Texas, began building its own crowdsourced database exclusively for police searches this year.But when the child rapist Jeffrey Epstein died, and more of his nominally philanthropic donations became public, science faced a reckoning.

The 8-Hour Workday Is a Counterproductive Lie

The 8-Hour Workday Is a Counterproductive Lie

Like most people writing hot takes and think pieces about productivity, I’m focusing on knowledge workers here—those of us who work at desks, mostly in front of computers, in offices or from home.

Americans Trust Scientists, Until Politics Gets in the Way

Americans Trust Scientists, Until Politics Gets in the Way

Like many surveys and studies before it, a new report from the Pew Research Center confirms this truth: Americans love and trust scientists.

The Internet Changed Astrology. Then Came the Memes

The Internet Changed Astrology. Then Came the Memes

The abundance of information online about celestial movements and a seemingly infinite number of people writing horoscopes has transformed the practice from a devout subculture to a subject so popular that there are hundreds, maybe thousands, of social media accounts dedicated solely to star signs.

The World Might Actually Run Out of People

The World Might Actually Run Out of People

“Once that decline begins, it will never end.” Penguin Random House But Empty Planet is not a book about statistics so much as it is about what’s driving the choices people are making during the fastest period of change in human history.

Māori carvers head to Antarctica

Māori carvers head to Antarctica

Poutama Hetaraka says he is not only looking forward to experiencing a completely different environment but also to seeing mātauranga Māori become more and more embedded in conversations about environmental management of the Earth and Antarctica in particular”.

Our Favorite Cosplay From NYC's Black Comic Book Festival

Our Favorite Cosplay From NYC's Black Comic Book Festival

The annual event, hosted by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, featured two days of panels, screenings, and book signings, as well as the wall-to-wall cosplay that's become a staple at any fan convention.

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls

Many publications have since found ways to allow open access in their journals by permitting it but charging an expensive (usually hundreds or thousands of dollars per article) “article processing charge,” or APC, that is paid by the institution or the author behind the research as a sort of cost of being published.

2018 Was a Rough Year for Truth Online

2018 Was a Rough Year for Truth Online

More often than not, the information provided by companies like Twitter and Facebook in their high-profile data dumps is nothing new to any platform researcher worth their salt.

How Russian Trolls Used Meme Warfare to Divide America

How Russian Trolls Used Meme Warfare to Divide America

At the time, the company was asked: “Does Facebook believe that any of the content created by the Russian Internet Research Agency was designed to discourage anyone from voting?” Facebook responded: “We believe this is an assessment that can be made only by investigators with access to classified intelligence and information from all relevant companies and industries.”A Facebook spokesperson added on Monday morning: “We continue to fully cooperate with officials investigating the IRA’s activity on Facebook and Instagram around the 2016 election.

News Article: Innovation in agriculture vital to address future food challenges

News Article: Innovation in agriculture vital to address future food challenges

21 November 2018, Rome - Rapid advances in agricultural innovation that address climate change and support family farmers are crucial if the Sustainable Development Goals are to be achieved, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization's Director-General told the opening session of the first International Symposium on Agricultural Innovation for Family Farmers.

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like Cults

Online Conspiracy Groups Are a Lot Like CultsMaddie McGarvey/Bloomberg/Getty ImagesIn recent months there’s been an increase in stories in which a follower of radical conspiracies shifts their actions from the web and into the world.In June, a QAnon conspiracy follower kicked off a one-man standoff at the Hoover Dam. Another QAnon supporter was arrested the next month occupying a Cemex cement factory, claiming that he had knowledge that Cemex was secretly assisting in child trafficking—a theory discussed in Facebook groups, in an attempt to push it into Twitter trending topics.Renee DiResta (@noUpside) is an Ideas contributor for WIRED, the director of research at New Knowledge, and a Mozilla fellow on media, misinformation, and trust.

How to Teach Artificial Intelligence Some Common Sense

How to Teach Artificial Intelligence Some Common Sense

A neural net trained to recognize only canaries isn’t of any use in recognizing, say, birdsong or human speech.“We don’t need massive amounts of data to learn,” Marcus says.

Urban 20: Cities at the center of local solutions to global development challenges

Urban 20: Cities at the center of local solutions to global development challenges

As a strategic partner of the summit and the overall Urban 20 (U20) Initiative, the World Bank Group – including the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation (IFC) – is committed to helping global cities bring their expertise, needs, and voices to the center of global discussions on sustainable development.

The 19th-century tumult over climate change – and why it matters today

The 19th-century tumult over climate change – and why it matters today

Farmers knew intuitively that even a small change in baseline climate greatly increased the risk of extremes, and a single drought could ruin a farming community, even if followed by years of good weather.

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

Global warming could mean crop losses from insect damage double in ‘breadbasket of Europe’ by 2050

“In some temperate countries, insect pest damage to crops is projected to rise sharply as temperatures continue to climb, putting serious pressure on grain producers,” said Professor Joshua Tewksbury, co-lead author of the study and a research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder.