Why Creating a Covid-19 Vaccine Is Taking So Long

Why Creating a Covid-19 Vaccine Is Taking So Long

In the US, this typically takes 10 months and is authorized through the Food and Drug Administration, though it’s virtually a given that regulators will speed up the approval of a Covid-19 vaccine.

Covid-19's Toll on Prison Labor Doesn't Just Hurt Inmates

Covid-19's Toll on Prison Labor Doesn't Just Hurt Inmates

In at least 20 states, from Florida to Michigan to Texas to California, incarcerated workers are making hand sanitizer, face masks, and protective gowns at prison manufacturing facilities.Social distancing is hard in prison workplaces, and incarcerated people are unable to self-quarantine to avoid Covid-19 when they’re off the job.

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Have Dropped 17 Percent During the Pandemic

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Have Dropped 17 Percent During the Pandemic

Each sector comes with its own unique dynamics: Air traffic has of course plummeted, but that industry only accounts for 3 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions in a normal year.

The US Will Help a Taiwan Firm Build a Chip Plant in Arizona

The US Will Help a Taiwan Firm Build a Chip Plant in Arizona

In a one-two punch aimed at China’s rising technological prowess, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), the world’s leading contract manufacturer of chips, said it would build a manufacturing plant in the US and the White House announced new rules to block Huawei ’s access to such cutting-edge components.

How Is the Coronavirus Pandemic Affecting Climate Change?

How Is the Coronavirus Pandemic Affecting Climate Change?

Back in February, an analysis by the climate group Carbon Brief found that as the pandemic seized hold of China’s economy and heavy industries shuttered, emissions from the country plummeted by an incredible 25 percent.

The Defense Production Act Won’t Fix America’s N95 Face Mask Shortage

The Defense Production Act Won’t Fix America’s N95 Face Mask Shortage

With federal stockpiles nearly exhausted, public health officials are pleading with the Trump administration to use the Defense Production Act to lead a wartime mobilization of US industry to make the masks desperately needed by healthcare workers.

The ‘Surreal’ Frenzy Inside the US’ Biggest Mask Maker

The ‘Surreal’ Frenzy Inside the US’ Biggest Mask Maker

Faced with hundreds of millions of orders a day, and a limited number of masks, Prestige Ameritech decided to sell only to hospitals, rather than the general public, and has prioritized working with medical centers that will sign five-year contracts, to reduce the likelihood that the company will have to lay off all its new employees once the pandemic subsides.

A Cobalt Crisis Could Put the Brakes on Electric Car Sales

A Cobalt Crisis Could Put the Brakes on Electric Car Sales

While soaring prices of the core material in lithium-ion batteries sparked a mining rush in Australia, Argentina and Chile and—which between them provided 91 percent of supply in 2017, says Harper—a slump in demand caused by a weak automotive market and a reduction in grants for buying such cars in China has slowed the pace of mining and processing plant construction.

The End of the BlackBerry Is Officially Upon Us

The End of the BlackBerry Is Officially Upon Us

Today, BlackBerry Mobile posted what amounts to an amicable breakup note on Twitter, saying that TCL's license to the BlackBerry brand would expire August 31, 2020, at which point the two companies would go their separate ways.

Bell and Hyundai Soar Into the Air Taxi Race

Bell and Hyundai Soar Into the Air Taxi Race

Hyundai’s partnership with Uber, announced formally at CES, will facilitate the carmaker’s transition to aircraft manufacturing, says Nikhil Goel, Uber’s head of product in its aviation efforts.

Tesla Turns a Profit—and Builds a Chinese Factory Very Fast

Tesla Turns a Profit—and Builds a Chinese Factory Very Fast

CEO Elon Musk said the company was still on track to sell 360,000 vehicles by the end of the year, which would see Tesla grind out a record 105,000 cars in 2019’s last three months.

8 Ways Overseas Drug Manufacturers Dupe the FDA

8 Ways Overseas Drug Manufacturers Dupe the FDA

At the plant’s quality-control laboratory, an investigator scrutinized the results of high-performance liquid chromatography tests, which measure the impurities in a drug sample and display them as a series of peaks in a record called a chromatogram.

GE Sells Solar-Business Stake to BlackRock

GE Sells Solar-Business Stake to BlackRock

The GE deal comes as investors begin prioritizing a solar segment that was once viewed as riskier than developments for utilities or homeowners: projects for commercial and industrial customers.

Little Plastic 'Nurdles' Are Flooding Beaches and Waterways

Little Plastic 'Nurdles' Are Flooding Beaches and Waterways

They want Formosa to pay $184 million in penalties, the maximum allowed by the Clean Water Act. For more than three years, Diane Wilson and two other local volunteers have collected more than 2,400 samples of nurdles and pellet powder discharged illegally by Formosa’s 2,500-acre Port Lavaca facility.

The Need for Carbon Fiber Could Ground the Flying Car Future

The Need for Carbon Fiber Could Ground the Flying Car Future

(Conventional carbon fiber manufacturing requires pieces to be shaped and then baked in an oven to set, a longer and more labor-intensive process.) Fixes If Icon is a cautionary tale, another new airplane manufacturer could prove to be an inspiration for the eVTOL.

We Need to Not Freak Out About the Robot Revolution

We Need to Not Freak Out About the Robot Revolution

"Because building things is great and important, but let's not have nostalgia for the days where my great grandfather would be on an assembly line losing a finger every four years." Marlene Awaad/Bloomberg/Getty Images You, like me, may sometimes (or all the time!) feel that the world is spiraling out of control—trade wars and political strife.

HP's New 3-D Printers Build Items Not of Plastic but of Steel

HP's New 3-D Printers Build Items Not of Plastic but of Steel

HP's New 3-D Printers Build Items Not of Plastic but of SteelHP is hoping its new Metal Jet 3-D printers will provide inroads into manufacturing sectors such as automobiles and medical devices.HPWhen you think about 3-D printing, chances are you think of little plastic doodads created by desktop devices like those made by MakerBot. Computing and printer giant HP wants you to think about metal.Today the company announced the Metal Jet printer, an industrial-scale 3-D printer that builds items not of plastic but of steel.3-D plastic printing is widely used for custom items such as prosthetics and hearing aids, and by product designers for prototyping.