The Pandemic Gave Scientists a New Way to Spy on Emissions

The Pandemic Gave Scientists a New Way to Spy on Emissions

For example, they can add up how much gasoline is being burned and how many fossil fuel power plants are running at a given time, to calculate how much carbon is being exhaled into the atmosphere.

It’s Not Too Late to Stop Mass Extinction in the Ocean

It’s Not Too Late to Stop Mass Extinction in the Ocean

Temperatures around the tropics shot up by 10 degrees Celsius and deep-sea currents slowed down, which starved the oceans of oxygen.In the other scenario, lower emissions keep temperature increases to just under 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century.

Why Florida’s Covid Surge Is Screwing With the Water Supply (Hint: Oxygen)

Why Florida’s Covid Surge Is Screwing With the Water Supply (Hint: Oxygen)

Just over half of Florida’s total population is fully vaccinated.“What we know is that the lack of liquid oxygen is due to a driver shortage and the need for available supplies to be diverted to local hospitals due to the Covid-19 pandemic,” says Brandon Moore, spokesperson for Tampa Bay Water.

So Your Wearable Tracks Blood Oxygen Data. How Do You Use It?

So Your Wearable Tracks Blood Oxygen Data. How Do You Use It?

In September, Apple announced that its Watch Series 6 would also have the ability to monitor blood oxygen levels right from your wrist.Why do I need to monitor my blood oxygen level.

Larry Brilliant on How Well We Are Fighting Covid-19

Larry Brilliant on How Well We Are Fighting Covid-19

But it’s been just a little over three months since I spoke to then-75-year-old Brilliant, an epidemiologist who aided in the eradication of smallpox, and who for years has been warning the world of a pandemic that looks very much like the one we have now.

Scientists nurturing only plant of its kind

Scientists nurturing only plant of its kind

Mr Champion says that for the past five to six years NIWA has been working with the Lake Omapere Trustees to find a home for the quillwort in Northland.

After 60 Years, Explosion-Powered Rockets Are Nearly Here

After 60 Years, Explosion-Powered Rockets Are Nearly Here

As the director of the Propulsion and Energy Research Laboratory at the University of Central Florida, Ahmed has spent the last few years developing a next generation rocket engine that uses controlled explosions to boost stuff into space.

Why These Geese Wear Tiny Backpacks and Fly in a Wind Tunnel

Why These Geese Wear Tiny Backpacks and Fly in a Wind Tunnel

To find out, University of Texas at Austin physiologist Julia York went above and beyond, raising goose chicks to gain their trust before training them to fly in a wind tunnel under low oxygen conditions.To learn more, including the understandable difficulties of getting geese to fly in wind tunnels, take a look at the video above.

The Beauty and Madness of Sending a Man to the Moon

The Beauty and Madness of Sending a Man to the Moon

At one point there was talk of a rocket called Nova that would have had eight of the beasts on its first stage and might have launched a spacecraft heavy enough to land on the moon and then come back.

Now Ocean Plastics Could Be Killing Oxygen-Making Bacteria

Now Ocean Plastics Could Be Killing Oxygen-Making Bacteria

The specks materializing even in human feces .Now scientists have exposed a potential new consequence of the plastic menace: The toxins the material leaches into seawater inhibit the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of the bacteria Prochlorococcus , which is responsible for producing an estimated 20 percent of the oxygen we breathe.

Space Photos of the Week: Mooooooon Shadow, Moon Shadow

Space Photos of the Week: Mooooooon Shadow, Moon Shadow

Engineers want to study the dark side of the moon, seeking out deposits of water ice there. If we can get robots and humans back up to the moon, they might be able to dig up that ice and convert it into fuel to power rockets.

The Real Reason You See Earthworms After Rain

The Real Reason You See Earthworms After Rain

It is probably one of the first “nature lessons” we learned at school: earthworms have to come to the surface after rain because they’re drowning. Another common explanation for worm emergence is that rain sounds like predators, so the worms come to the surface to escape.

Scientists listen to the sound of photosynthesising seaweeds

Scientists listen to the sound of photosynthesising seaweeds

While measuring the sound produced by the bubbles could be used as a cheap alternative to estimate algal cover and ecosystem health in coral reefs, NIWA scientists say there is also potential to use it to learn more about New Zealand kelp forests.

The Sea May Be Absorbing Way More Heat Than We Thought

The Sea May Be Absorbing Way More Heat Than We Thought

“When it loses that gas, we can track it in the atmosphere.”So far, so simple: As climate change causes the ocean to heat up, the water releases O2 and CO2 into the atmosphere, which a handful of land-based sensors then detect (they’ve been doing so for decades, giving the researchers lots of data to play with).

Ancient civilisation? Was prehistoric global warming caused by pre-human species

Ancient civilisation? Was prehistoric global warming caused by pre-human species

Was prehistoric global warming caused by pre-human speciesA new study from a climatologist and a professor of astrophysics has revealed a massive spike in global warming 56 million years ago.This spike was discovered in a dramatic change in the geological composition buried deep beneath Earth’s surface in an era known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM).To investigate the idea of a possible pre-historic intelligent civilisation, the duo, Professor Adam Frank, of the University of Rochester and Gavin Schmidt, director of Nasa's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), examined what evidence we, as humans, would leave behind if we were to become extinct.Writing in The Atlantic, Professor Frank said: “There is a conundrum here.

Climate Change DEAD ZONE: Scientists warn clock is ticking as ‘oceans suffocate’

Climate Change DEAD ZONE: Scientists warn clock is ticking as ‘oceans suffocate’

Oceanographers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) came across their finding after deploying a team of robot submarines in the Gulf of Oman.Their collected data found a monstrous dead zone the size of the US state of Florida – and the area is unfortunately spreading.Dead zones, or Oxygen Minimum Zones, are areas with extremely low levels of oxygen in bodies of water such as oceans and large lakes.Dr Bastien Queste from UEA’s School of Environmental Sciences said: “Dead zones are areas devoid of oxygen.